Those darn rusted screws!

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On 10/3/2012 2:20 PM, Erik wrote:


That lightness might explain its persistent smell even days after using it. In a lot of ways it is like WD-40.

Well, that claim might be contested by Jim.

Thanks.
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It will not harm metals. In fact, such very-light oils are used as rust /preventives/, at which job they excel. Think Carwell.

Such oils are often readily taken-up by plastics, which causes them to swell, distort, and soften. Factory paints are not affected. Aftermarket paints may or may not be softened or dissolved by oils.
--
Tegger

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On 10/03/2012 05:34 PM, Tegger wrote:

as pointed out by someone else, this blaster stuff is not just oil, it contains a reducing agent. which is fine short term, but longer term, it creates a corrosion problem.

/way/ too much of a generalization - it depends on /what/ plastic. the gear drive for the speedo in your integra is a "plastic" for example, one that's immersed in oil for all its working life.
[and "plastic" is a horribly imprecise word with two different meanings. what you really mean is "polymer", preferably stating which kind, like nylon, h.d.p.e, p.m.m.a, etc.]

it depends /what/ oil, and how long is the exposure. and not all paints are the same either.

technical knowledge may or may not be gained from bothering to read newsgroups.
--
fact check required

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On 10/03/2012 11:41 AM, cameo wrote:

sure. and they can make any claim they want - doesn't mean it's factual or accurate if nobody's taken the time and effort to officially contest it.
you can test yourself easily enough. i noticed this problem when i used it on a half shaft locknut and left it standing for a couple of months. the area sprayed, with the runoff onto the brake disk, was rusted to blazes. the rest of the disk/hub was the same as it had been before.
other "mistaken" labeling examples are out there. google "simple green" and "stress corrosion cracking", especially with regard to bike chain. then compare that with their label claims.
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Stainless steel is the only metal that should ever be used for license- plate fasteners.
Galvanized is no good: eventually the coating wears out and they rust anyway.
--
Tegger

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On 10/03/2012 05:52 AM, Tegger wrote:

how are license plate fasteners any different to fender bolts? or electrical ground bolts? or headlight bolts? shouldn't the body panels be stainless too?

so grease the s**t out of them. or use plastic.
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cameo wrote:

Not mentioned in the any of the posts... Liquid Wrench, an oldie and very effective. Just give it a little time.
Another hint, when installing new bolts, make sure that they are just long enough to do the job and coat the threads with some chassis/wheel bearing lube.
Keep it simple...
JT
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