Tire pressure - 2005 Pilot

Tires always seem to be losing pressure. I fill them to 32 psi, as recommended, then within a month or so, they're down and the remote sensor is lighting up inside the car.
standard wheels and tires for the 2005. What's up with this..? Is it a bad tire/wheel combination..?
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Larry J. - Remove spamtrap in ALLCAPS to e-mail

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Larry in AZ wrote:

Bad valve, porous casting or slow leak in tire?
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It's common to all four tires.
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How far down is the pressure after a month? What low pressure setting sets off the TPMS sensor? Loss of air is natural through a rubber tire. Some tires may lose air more than others. You might find some places now selling a nitrogen fill for your tires. It's basically a gimmick to sell you a dollar or two worth of gas fill for as much as $30 per tire. They will try and upsell you on this nitrogen fill with claims such as longer lasting tires due to less oxidation (deterioration) of the tire and other outrageous claims. The only apparent advantage is that nitrogen will not leak from your tires because nitrogen molecules are larger than oxygen molecules so they will not escape as easy. If the leakdown bothers you and you don't want to deal with it you may find a reasonable price to fill with nitrogen. Of course if money is no object, pay whatever someone wants to charge you and any extra money you have you can send to me. Howard

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Waiving the right to remain silent, "Howard"

Probably around 26 psi or so.

I've had more than 20 cars and/or SUVs. Not one has ever lost tire pressure like this Pilot.

Bah... I'll do nothing but fill the tires with air. It's a lease, and will be gone next January.
Thanks for your help.
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Larry J. - Remove spamtrap in ALLCAPS to e-mail

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Larry in AZ ( snipped-for-privacy@DE.LETE.THISljvideo.com) writes:

Knowing where the leak is occuring is the first step in fixing it. Take each wheel off in turn and spray it with a soap and water solution. Small bubbles will appear whereever the leak is.
For all four to leak on such a new vehicle is unusual. Makes me think valves. Perhaps the wrong stem got installed in the valves.
I have repaired many aluminum wheels for slow leaks. The leak is always caused by salt corrosion in the bead area, and usually in conjunction with a wheel that has had several tire changes (such as twice annual winter / all season switch). This is because tire change machines have a natsy habit of removing the finish on the wheel at the very edge of the flange. This creates the ideal situation for salt solution to attack the wheel. Dan
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