Tire running out of air slowly

I've noticed that one of my tires is slowly running out of air. Every two-three days I need to get it inflated. I was wondering what's the best way to discover where the leak is? (I have a honda 98 civic)
Thanks,
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Soapy water and look for the bubbles.
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Jason wrote:

-----------------------------
Soapy water has been used since day one.. Dish soap in a squirter bottle might be good.
'Curly'
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'Curly Q. Links' wrote:

    Do you have alloy wheels? They can be porous enough to loose air themselves. Best method is still the old dunk tank. where you can see the tread and sidewall areas as you rotate the tire in a trough of water. most tire stores have them. bob
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Jason wrote:

Soapy water works, but there is no sense in doing it unless you aim to get a plug kit once you find the leak (if it is in the tread). It may be just as easy to bring it down to a local tire shop.
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wrote:

Like everyone said, a dunk tank. Let the mechanic do it. You can inspect the tread to look for nails and maybe even find a hiss by ear. I've had tires that were bumped on the side and lost a little air now and then until remounted, or at least that's what it seemed like. It came and went until I replaced the tires a year later.
J.
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I just hope the mechanic can find the hole and fix it. I don't want to buy a new tire... but isn't the tire manufacturer has some kind of warranty for road hazards?
Jason
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the tire, and I buy it when getting new tires. If the leak is in the tread, not in the sidewall, the tire can normally be repaired.
Mike
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don't forget the valve stem. you can tighten that yourself if you have the little thingie (WalMart has 'em). Last fall one of my winter tires was low coming out of storage on its steel rim, turned out to be just a loose stem. more often for me, though, a slow leak is a nail that's still in the tire. look hard at it, you should be able to find the head.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in

That would be tightening the VALVE itself,the stem is the part that the valve is screwed into. The stem itself may need to be replaced;they do go bad.
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And the old cyclist's trick (since I am an old cyclist) is to lick your fingertip and see if the spit bubbles when you place the fingertip over the valve opening. Couth people might use soapy water there, too, but not me!
Mike
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That's interesting. Here the manufacturers call it a Road Hazard Warranty and it covers any damage to the tire, whether sidewall or tread. If the tire has to be replaced it is pro-rated against the tread wear to date. It's also included for no charge with the tire(s).
Brian
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Jason wrote:

Depending on the wear, it may not be best to purchase only 1 tire.
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I just wanted to ask the original poster if the rim has ever been damaged? I once ran into a possum and it caused the rim to slightly bend. The tire would not hold air (aka "slow leak"). I tried spraying some sort of "stop leak" spray into the tire. It helped for a couple of months. I eventually found a tire dealer that still had some inter tubes (spelling??). It solved the problem. I doubt if you will be able to find any tire dealers that still sell or stock intertubes. You may be able to find them for sell on ebay or do a google search. It's an excellent solution for a tire that has a slightly bent rim or any other leak that is hard to locate. If you can't find an intertube--try making use of the "stop leak" spray.
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I had a few mishaps on some potholes... the car hit hard.. but I wouldn't be able to see just off bat that the rim has been crooked. I think I'll get an oil change soon and get a check on that tire!
Jason
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On Mon, 22 Aug 2005 10:01:48 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Jason) wrote:

Not to my knowledge.
Rims and car are long gone.
Some previous era Honda wheels and rims were a bit funky, not designed well to hold weights, corroded a bit, etc. That and some rough parallel parking are my best theories.

Good lord, man, how large a possum was THAT?

Yikes! "Inner" tube, kidz.
J.
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Jason wrote:

Take it to a tire shop - most will check it free; most of the better ones will even fix it free (if you're in Western Canada, I'd recommend your nearest Kal Tire).
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