Transmission Fluid Change 92 Accord

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Doing my 30K service at 210K miles when I get to changing the transmission fluid I can't get the drain plug out. I don't have a 3/8 breaker bar which I'm planning on getting btw but I did try putting a
pipe on the end of a ratchet. Nothing! It didn't even budge. Any suggestions.
Also, when I went to change the plugs I found oil around 3 of them. I soaked it up before changing them. Heading to the dealer to get gaskets tomorrow. I'm surprised it didn't create any major issues. Most have been because there wasn't any oil inside the plug wires.
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Face wrote:

Try it with the engine and transmission at operating temperature, if you didn't. Usually, I have found things come apart more easily when hot, and in this case the Honda service manual actually says to take these plugs out with everything warmed up. Don't forget new gaskets for the drain and fill plugs.
<snip>
--
JRE

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I did warm up the engine but I didn't drive it a lot. Around the block, maybe a mile. So I'll try getting it good and hot. I'll pick up a new washer for the drain plug but don't think I need one to fill it. You refill it via the dip stick. Sorry, I forgot to mention that it's an automatic.
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On 3/8/10 4:53 PM, in article
wrote:

1. Get a longer pipe. I've found a four foot piece of gas pipe works pretty well. 2. Use a breaker bar, not a ratchet. A ratchet will break with the amount of force its going to take.

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Get a dealer to do this particular fluid change. That way they use their air tools to buzz the bolt loose. After that it should be easy to remove it yourself during future changes, which will hopefully be done more often than once a lifetime.
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Tegger, it's been done every 30k for as long as I've owned the car. It's been 30k since the last one. Dealers done all of the service until this one. So it's been out before.
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Hm. I mistakenly got a different impression from your original post.
Well, the dealer-buzz idea will still work.
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I'm considering doing it. I already have the fluid so the cost would be $30. I can't drive in like I can for an oil change which doesn't really make any sense. I may call again to see if I get a different answer. I still may try one more time when it's good and hot.
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Just buy a bigger tool and do it yourself. The last "professional" bozo who changed the fluid probably over-tightened the drain plug which is why you are having trouble removing it now.
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Carter Zogby wrote:

A well built air wrench and small compressor/tank is a sound investment if you plan to do regular maintenance on the car. There are several commonly replaced components, including drive axles and timing belts, that require busting loose a Godzilla sized nut or bolt. People will try to sell you a huge air tank, but IMO, you don't need one. All you need is a few seconds of air. If one blast doesn't do the trick, waiting a few minute for the system to recharge is not a big deal.
A few years back I was faced with loosening the axle nuts on my newly purchased 92 Accord. After shearing off two breaker bars, I finally broke down and bought an IR gun/ratchet kit for a little over a hundred bucks. (The cheapo compressor was another 70 or so.) In 2 seconds, the mid-range 321g gun did more than 2 hours of my swearing and jumping up and down. Over the years, I've slowly warmed to the air ratchet. For certain jobs, the time saved more than makes up for the hassle of dragging round the hose, etc.
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Greg wrote:

I agree about air tools in general, but unless I'm working a real marathon project I rarely use the air ratchet. The impact wrench is nice for removing wheels and breaking suspension nuts and bolts (and essential for our motorhome, but I digress).
However, though I don't know why, the Honda service manual specifically says not to use an impact wrench on the axle nuts. I have a moderately long 1/2" breaker bar and while it's not easy I have never been unable to loosen the nuts on my '91 Accord. The extra-long one makes it *much* easier, though, and I completely concur with the "get a bigger tool" idea.
I have been told that one way to do this if you cannot do it by hand is to move the car on the ground (not jacked up) under engine power while the end of the breaker bar rests on the ground to break the nut. Don't move the car too far (several inches is enough). Needless to say, don't forget to un-dent the center part first so it will rotate freely or you will break things. I have not done this myself, so I can't recommend it. Caveat emptor (you'll be a buyer if you break something ;-). I've also heard this being used by people who could not loosen lug bolts or nuts.
And no matter what the manual says, I would never use an impact wrench on a bolt that screws into a crankshaft I owned--but of course, your crank, your rules.
--
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On 3/11/10 8:29 PM, in article hnc8ua$7fu$ snipped-for-privacy@news.eternal-september.org,

Read it again. The Honda service manual says not to use an impact wrench to TIGHTEN the axle nuts. There is no prohibition on using it to loosen them.

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E. Meyer wrote: <snip>

Son of a gun. Now that I go back and look, you're right.
<snip>
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They mean not to use an imact wrench for TIGHTENING the axle nut. Toyota warns about the same thing. The issue tere is the possibility of overtightening the nut and snapping the nose off the CV joint.
However, you are free to use the most powerful impact wrench you like to /loosen/ axle nuts.
I have DeWalt electric, which is the only practical thing I can use. The DeWalt is capable of 325 ft/lbs, and in several years of use, has ALWAYS loosened EVERY bolt I have tried it on. This includes suspension bolts, crank pullet bolts, axle nuts, you name it.

You can use an impact wrench on a crank bolt with no worries at all. No professional garage (even the factory or the dealer) would waste their time trying to remove a crank bolt by hand.
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On 03/11/2010 06:29 PM, JRE wrote:

to tighten, not loosen.

occasionally, if you do work on other people's cars, you'll find one that is nigh-on impossible. one civic i had, the axle bolt was so firmly locked in position, i bent a 3/4" breaker bar trying to loosen it. a 325 lb.ft impact wrench wouldn't touch it. i eventually cut the nut in two places with a dremel an chiseled the two halves off.
moral of the story: never use an impact wrench to tighten axle nuts.

never use one to tighten, not loosen.
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jim beam ( snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net) writes:

Did you ever consider this as a possible solution to the tedium of a Dremel on an axle nut?
Here in the eastern rust belt, large trucks don't carry spare tires. When they get a flat, they call in a 'mobile truck tire repair' service. You wouldn't believe how the large lug-nuts on trucks rust seize on. The mobile tire guys are fully equipped with huge 3/4" or 1" drive impact wrenches to zip the large nuts off. A person who has super stubborn axle nuts (or an impossible Honda crank pulley bolt) might want to think about calling up the local truck tire guy to come over in his fully equipped truck to zip the axle nuts off. If time isn't critical, a deal might be made with them, such as, "are any of your guys passing by this way to fix some tires on a big rig?" I don't know if they have metric sockets, but usually a large non-metric size (over 7/8") socket, carefully selected for fit (small slop), on large metric fasteners will work.

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On 03/15/2010 06:09 PM, M.A. Stewart wrote:

afaik, 32mm is not a typical truck size, otherwise this would be a great suggestion. you could also buy your own impact socket and have them use it...
in the past, i've popped over to the local honda dealer, and while over-paying for some engine oil or some such, they've air-tooled such things off. in this instance though, i already had the vehicle in some state of disassembly, and really didn't want to put it all back together. dremel was indeed tedious, but it worked.

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jim beam ( snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net) writes:

I just checked... a 1 1/4'' socket fits a 31.64mm (measured across the flats with a vernier caliper) nut perfectly... I assuming it's a 32mm nut... it's a Honda axle nut from the late 1980's.

Shit happens. Been there.

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wrote:

Well I've been looking for excuse to buy an impact wrench. Maybe this is it. I have a compressor but it's tankless and I don't know if it's powerful enough to drive one which means I would need a better compressor. I was thinking that I need to get a 3/8 breaker bar but I already have a half inch one. All I really need is a half inch to 3/8 reducer. Still, I don't think a breaker bar will work.
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Tankless compressors won't have anywhere near enough grunt to drive an impact wrench. In fact, you'll probably be able to hold the socket still with your hand while attempting to run the impact wrench.
If you don't have a compressor with a tank the size of a rain barrel, just use an electric impact wrench.
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