Turning Rotors: a case study...

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Stephen H wrote:


there's laws about letting a vehicle leave the shop in that condition, regardless of how it drove in. you need to check into them.

but that's the point guy!!! you get /trained/ to skim disks as the "solution", but [and here's the point that i find fascinating] your experience contradicts what you were told! but you still /repeat/ what you were told! can you tell what's wrong with this picture?

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Realistically, there isn't much that can be done. The customer can't be forced to pay for repairs he doesn't want, and restraining either the customer or his property isn't allowed - those are crimes. If a peace officer shows up in time he can take the car off the road but a citizen legally can't (at least not in the US - in any state I know if.)
When I was in aviation we would occasionally see planes in obviously unairworthy condition come through and all we could do was inform our FAA safety inspector.
Mike
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">>

Some states yes, not this one (we wish there was!)

It has to do with the quality of the OEM part. Sometimes they are better, other times (as in the Taurus) there worse. BMW, VW Volvo and now even Ford Focus have a extremely soft metal for the rotors. Replace them with the pads they wear that quick.
--
Stephen W. Hansen
ASE Certified Master Automobile Technician
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I replaced the front rotors on our '85 Volvo with aftermarket rotors from NAPA and pads from Volvo when money was tight (the Volvo pads don't rattle like aftermarket pads do). Now the pads are about half worn and the rotors are severely worn.
Mike
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Stephen H wrote:

if you do a basic surface scratch test for these disks vs. others of "harder" metal, you'll not find much difference. what i know for sure is that some oem pads have a high silica content [with some aftermarket pad producers copying their lead]. silica is an aggressive abrasive. this is specified by the manufacturers you cite allegedly to eliminate disk glazing and cope with surface rust on salted roads, and it does have some benefit for those purposes. reality however is that it's all about life limitation.
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The only Taurus experience I've had was on one my #2 son owned for a couple years. I didn't get into the brakes, but when he was in Montana the clutch went out. Turns out the clutch on the 2.4L 4 cyl is only 6 inches diameter! It seems to me the Ford strategy for cars (but not for trucks) is to make something that gives three years good service, and anything goes after that.
Mike
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Michael Pardee wrote:

yes indeed! it's all about the first owner; all the others can go hang.
buddy of mine used to work at one of their r&d facilities. all their time & money was going into cost control [which is ok] and life limitation [which is not, since the price differential between say ford & honda is minimal]. if a ford was 1/3 the price of a honda, i'd have no problem with it, but i'm wierd like that.
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