What factors go into the oil life indicator: 2006 Civic

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Nope. That's cause I don't agree.

I never said you stated it. I said if you did state that's the interval you use, I don't care. But when you post that others should in an open forum, there will be active debate on it.

Which cap companies are currently suggesting a 3750/5000 interval? I know that it isn't the case on the '01 Accord, '02 Venture, '03 SRX and '06 Passat. Nor is it suggested on the '06 which is what started this thread. So which manufacturers are? The only ones that are suggesting it are the oil change places and we know what their motivation is.
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The 500mi vs. 7,500mi OCI was an extreme example to illustrate how oil affects engine life. But to whoever said there's no data relating oil change intervals to engine longevity, you're wrong. There is a DIRECT relationship, though not stated through specific mileage numbers. There was a contest in California decades ago about which organization could put the most mileage on a car within one year. Not sure about the specifics, but a Civic won with 1,000,000 miles. They changed the oil every 1,000mi as one of the factors in ensuring a long life. I'm sure a quick search will yield an article.
I can't stress this enough, go to http://www.bobistheoilguy.com !

"You could go ahead and change your oil at 1500 and I won't care. When you recommend others do the same despite changes in modern engineering (i.e. engines are better, oil is better and we have better ways of predicting it's condition), someone will challenge that advice."
Grumpy AuContraire wrote:

Yes, I agree.

Agreed, though I feel the extra filter change isn't neccessary. This entire discussion was sparked when Seth disagreed that 7,500mi OCIs were too lengthy. He argued that the Oil Life Meter is entirely accurate, so if it suggests 7,500, then the oil life meter is correct. I suggested 5,000mi changes regardless of the OLM, and he argued that the oil is capable of providing adequate protection until the meter says it can't.

I use Specialty Formulations' MTL-P synthetic transmission fluid in my 6spd Civic Si. Aside from the peace of mind, I have noticed a true improvement in shift quality; the infamous notchiness in 3rd gear is gone! And no, this is not my imagination, many people have noted shift feel improvement after switching to ANY synthetic tranny fluid in the '06 Si. The MTL-P is very similar to Honda MTF viscosity (11.5cSt), but the synth stock/additive package is way superior. A VOA shows Honda MTF to be similar to engine oil, with an increased calcium content... But I'm curious to see what Acura's newly reformulated tranny fluid is all about.
And again, I must disagree; synthetic engine oil does provide great advantages over dino oil. It may not be worth the extra money for, say, a family-carrying Camry, but for high-rev, high performance applications, there is a significant improvement. Synthetic oil not only coats better and retains viscosity at extreme temps, but its cleaning abilities are well documented. The synthetic advantage may be greater for tranny fluid, seeing as how much more stress is exerted on transmission components, but synth motor oil is worth every penny.
Of course, this is all my opinion.
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Sorry, I do not buy the proposal that even a 500 mile interval is necessarily superior to a 7500 mile interval.

That's not what I said.
You have to read carefully. You have to write even more carefully.
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wrote

I'm gonna give him the beneift of the doubt and say the above was a typo and he meant to say 5000 vs. 7500.

Reading comprehension is not high on his list.
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Seth wrote:

Doubt that it was a typo. That's why he referred to it as an extreme example, Seth.
Arguing between the merits of a 7,500 mi oil change and one at 5,000 is not what I'd call extreme.
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wrote

Good point.
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Yup, no where in there did I sate you said it. Reading comprehension is not primary to you I see.
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I claim bullshit.
A year is 8,760 hours. A million miles in 8,760 hours calculates to....drum roll, please....114+ miles per hour.
That's straight running, with no stopping for fuel or driver changes.
Let's say fuel and driver changes are simultaneous, at 5 minutes every, oh, 400 miles. That's 2500 stops right there. 2500 times 5 is 12,500 minutes, or 208 hours. Now instead of 8760 driving hours, you have only 8552 driving hours.
Oil changes every 1K miles? Let's say an oil change takes 5 minutes (I'm being generous here). Let's further say that it happens, on average, during a fuel/driver change. So let's not even calculate the extra oil change time; let's leave straight available drive time at 8552 hours.
1,000,000 miles over 8552 hours is 117 miles per hour.
So this Civic drove between 114 and 117 mph for a year straight?

Well, then, why don't you do that. I'm sure the article would tell us how a Civic went 115mph straight for a year, with no hiccups in any of the fuel/driver/oil change periods, all of them running at an optimal 5 minutes.
Or maybe my quick calculations are all you need to back down on this particular fable.
<snip random stuff about synthetic oils)

Your calculator has an opinion? Gee, mine just does calculations. Maybe my calculator is operating in some number base that yours doesn't?
Was that 1,000,000 miles in base 2?
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Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

Haha. That's a lot of calculations you went through. I guess I'm wrong about the one year time limit; like I said, I don't remember specifics. Do the Google search and find the contest website, I'm too lazy.
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On 17 Sep 2006 16:23:39 -0700, televascular wrote:

Now THIS I find interesting...
I, too, have noticed this phenomena in 3rd. It has, on occasion, caused a slight grind, as I didn't get the car fully into third before letting out the clutch, as the notchiness (good word for it) interrupted my rythem.
What are the downsides (if any) to changing to a Synthetic Tranny fluid? The manual is pretty clear on sticking with Honda's Tranny fluid. Would this affect warranty?
Also, should it be done in a shop, or is it sufficient to just drain the fluid and add the Synth? I've never changed Tranny fluid before in any car. Always had it done by a shop. But it usually costs $80 or more. If it is relatively easy, I'll do it myself...
Thanks...
--
Joseph M. LaVigne
snipped-for-privacy@hits-buffalo.com
  Click to see the full signature.
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Joe LaVigne wrote:

Joe,
There is no perceived downside to synthetic transmission fluid, besides cost. I should warn you, however, that tranny fluid requires a very specific viscosity and additive package, and different trannies require different fluids. Honda uses the same MTF for nearly every vehicle they sell, so just find one that is compatible. I did a lot of research to find one that would be appropriate for the '06 Si, and I decided on the SF-MTL-P ($30.20 + shipping for one gallon). http://theoildrop.server101.com is a great resource.
Another note: after reading around on the internet, there have been some instances where people claimed to switch to Redline MTL in their Hondas, and then their synchros failed within 10,000 miles. Who knows if the two are related, but it's enough to deter me from buying their fluid.
A transmission fluid change is even easier than an oil change, since our Sis have no serviceable tranny oil filter. There are two plugs on the side of the transaxle: the top one is for filling, the bottom one is for draining. After draining, you fill the case with fluid until it starts overflowing through the top fill hole; that's how you know it's full. The service manual specs 1.6 quarts. You will need new washers for both plugs, and a funnel (preferably with a tube) for adding fluid. WARNING: on my old '98 Accord, I had a problem once where I drained the tranny fluid via the bottom plug, but the FILLER BOLT HAD SEIZED. I couldn't get it off for a while and it caused me a lot of stress. Make sure the filler bolt comes off easily BEFORE you begin draining!
Good luck!
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Joe,
I just re-read your post: changing to non-Honda fluid will not affect warranty. The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act states that a provider cannot void the warranty just because an aftermarket part is installed, unless it is proven without doubt that the aftermarket part directly caused failure or malfunction due to incompatibility or incorrect installation. It is up to the warranty provider to prove the part caused failure; you do NOT have to defend yourself.
But rest assured; pretty much any synthetic tranny fluid is better than Honda MTF. Even my dealership's mechanic confirmed that.
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Aaaah! I bet that was an unpleasant surprise.
"Many things may come between the mouth and the morsel." - Cato
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televascular wrote:

Do you have any factual evidence for this assertion, or is it simply your guess? You are saying that Honda's engineering team pushed the oil life envelope aggressively in order to reduce perceived cost of ownership.
You should also note that the reason Hondas do well in cost-of-ownership calculations is due first and foremost to relatively low depreciation costs thanks to high resale values. In fact, it would be counter productive for Honda to make recommendations which shorted the useful life of it's products and therefore speed up the depreciation curve.
People readily confuse assertions with fact.
John
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Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

Easily done. Just change your oil at some point early in the countdown. Personally I change the oil when the oil life monitor is around 20% left to go. Ta da, a safety margin.
John
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Sorry to tell you I used to pay $7.5 CDN for 1l of Honda's 5W20. I now pay 6.75 for 1l of Amsoil 5W20. Honda oil is the cheapest semi-synthetic blend from Petrocanada on the market. I believe the only worse blend is Yamalube, which is $10 per 1l. Although Amsoil 5W20 is not a pure synthetic just like Mobil 1 is not (unless it a 15,000 extended range oil), I would bet my last dollar that Amsoil 5W20 is superior to "Honda's" 5W20. I have a 2003 Accord with 223,000KM. I drive on Amsoil 0W30 and have been since 40,000KM. I replace the oil every 40,000KMs. For me that's every 3 months. If I had to change it every 8000KM, that would mean that I'd have to go under the car more frequently than every 2 weeks. I guess suckers are born every day, and the oil industry loves them, so keep up the busy lifestyle of changing oil.
Cheers.
televascular wrote:

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televascular wrote:

Blah blah blah. It looks like you have accumulated lots of opinion on the topic but little in the way of real data. None of your ramblings are backed up with evidence.
John
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