Which one is more snow worthy?

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...and that vehicle is an Audi, designed with performance in mind.
A tall wagon from Japan Inc? All it's going to do is wallow around and scare you to death long before the policeman's ball ticket velocity is achieved.
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On 8/15/2010 9:40 AM, Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

    It is definitely a concept geared toward performance.

    That's not necessarily true, around here (given the mindset of the officer at the time) a ticket can and has been issued for just being slightly (less than ten miles an hour) over the posted maximum. Which is fine by me, after all the *Posted Maximum* is the Maximum allowed by law and anyone exceeding that limit is breaking the law.
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On 8/14/2010 10:53 PM, Jill wrote:

    *Why?* is an excellent question. I believe the answer is that people who don't know very much listen to the media hype and advertising copy and make purchases based on what they are told in commercials, as to what *they* need to own and drive. In reality when a person purchases an AWD or 4WD vehicle they are making a purchase that is going to cost them more money throughout the ownership period of that vehicle. More gas needs to be bought (heavier vehicles use more fuel to move them), more maintenance expenses (more moving parts require more care).
I like to think of it akin to the people that make that purchase of a travel trailer or RV and use it once or twice a year for a long vacation trip. They could have easily saved their money and used their small car to travel and stayed in motels or hotels and had money left over every year for a long time. Not to mention the fact that they wouldn't have to make their meals and do the clean up and make their beds too. It's all about being smart and spending you money to get the most bang out of your buck.
Why buy something you don't need, Jill?
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I travel a lot during the winter. More often than not, it seems like the vehicle in the ditch or on its roof is an SUV driven by someone who thinks AWD makes him bulletproof. Just my observation, though.
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On 8/15/2010 10:32 AM, MG wrote:

    I have made the same observation in my travels and it doesn't have to be in the winter, some people drive like idiots all year long even in heavy rain where you can't see more than a vehicle length in front of your vehicle.
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I drive a lot year round, including winter, and I see the exact same thing. I've seen it more and more over the last five years, though. Dunno why.
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wrote:

Cause people like to spend more than necessary on gas and repairs?
I have 258,xxx miles on my Accord with under $600 in "unscheduled" repairs (not owners manual maintenance schedule stuff) and $x amount in gas. Bet you both of those numbers would have been considerably higher if I had a 4WD/AWD vehicle.
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wrote:

You know I read your post and said impossible or very lucky. Then I went and checked my records on my 1998 Accord 4cyl, 5 speed. When you break it down into unscheduled repairs, I've only had two. A fuel relay replacement and a new starter for a total under $400. I was surprised. It's got 220k now and the total costs of scheduled repairs is approaching $8,500 over the lifetime of the car. Still the best car I ever owned! Just anecdotal, but my wife has a 97 Outback w/ AWD. Mileage is 104k, less than half mine and her total unscheduled repairs are $1500 and the total repairs including that is $5,700.
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'01 V6 auto.
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On 8/15/2010 10:55 AM, Seth wrote:

    Excellent vehicle! I have one that is approaching being ten years old in December, working just like new and very few dollars spent on repairs over its life.
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*Why?* is an excellent question. I believe the answer is that people who don't know very much listen to the media hype and advertising copy and make purchases based on what they are told in commercials, as to what *they* need to own and drive. In reality when a person purchases an AWD or 4WD vehicle they are making a purchase that is going to cost them more money throughout the ownership period of that vehicle. More gas needs to be bought (heavier vehicles use more fuel to move them), more maintenance expenses (more moving parts require more care). >>
Well thank you for the information. I'm a very cautious driver and very rarely exceed the speed limit even in ideal weather conditions. In my area there is a lot of snow in the winter and getting 8-12" of snow in a storm is not uncommon. They plow the roads, but not in time for the work commute, more like 2pm in the afternoon. Going to work late is not an option for me. I need to get to work on time and I also need to get home to my family even when the road was plowed but the snow blew back onto the roads during high wind conditions. I don't know how everyone's road conditions are, but my area is moderate to heavy snow, high gale winds, dimly lit streets, hills, and icy bad plowed road conditions. My area is very hilly and that makes for difficult snow driving especially when you stop at a red light at the base or in the middle of a hill that you have to continue to go up while in snow. We also have very heavy rains in the spring, sometimes with street flooding and mud.
By the way I have a cousin who has a Hyundai Santa Fe which was bought with the Front Wheel Drive only. He said it was always horrible in the snow, and he got stuck many times with it. His sister has a Subaru Forester and she said her car was great in the snow and she never had any problems in the snow like her brother had with the Santa Fe. Same snow conditions, but big difference in ability. I'm inclined to believe that 4WD is better in snow that 2WD, but once I have a chance to see how it drives I will report it.
Thanks so much,
Jill
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On 8/15/2010 1:16 PM, Jill wrote:

    By the way in which you describe the area that you reside in, it sounds as if you need to move away from the Clampett mansion in the hills and closer to civilization. :^) Seriously though, If your roads are not being taken care of earlier in the day, you need to talk to your government representative(s) and have them take the initiative and look after their citizens' needs better.

    How long did he keep the Santa Fe? Did he get rid of it after finding that he wasn't able to drive it through snow?
    The more you go on, the more you sound like a troll, just tormenting the sensible people here with your *stories*.     
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In article

An Accord with good tires will handle that with aplomb.
You've succumbed to the marketing people and their panic method of marketing.
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In article

On identical tires, driving four wheels can give different results than driving only two wheels.
Driving two wheels on dedicated winter tires in the snow is VASTLY superior to driving all four wheels that are not using dedicated winter tires.
BTW, there's a huge difference between 4WD and AWD. Your CRV is AWD.
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Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

Hell, I used to drive through 10" snowfalls without hesitation in my old '76 Honda Civic back in RI in the late 1970's/1980's. It's all about being competent in what you do.
But now that I'm down south, I have no desire whatsoever to go back during the cold season...
JT
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I loved my gen 1 Civics. They would go everywhere, do everything--at least, once you got the choke unstuck.
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Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

I don't remember a manual choke on the CVVC but do so on the 1200.
I never had carb issues and I drove it to about 160K when it began rusting out from under me... Still was mechanically excellent.
Owning a Gen I (1976) is what drove me to consider a Gen II when gas prices started to climb about six years ago. Imagine, the Gen II is longer, wider, still handles the same and gets even better gas mileage.
And here in Texas, rust is a lesser issue...
JT
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If you're talking the front beam, Honda took care of ALL of those, completely free of charge.
Loved it.
Yeah, I'm remembering my 1200 Civic. In the depths of the cold winter, the choke would randomly stick. I never found rhyme or reason for that. It didn't keep the car from going, it just went badly for awhile until it unstuck. No amount of working the cable seemed to fix it.
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Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

Nope, everything was rusting especially the structural area where the rear control arms were mounted. I could push the whole area with my hand and that's when I decided to take it off the road.

You bet... I bought it from a friend who bought it new in 1976. Had 88K and all I ever did was replace front brake pads twice, and rebuilt the starter and alternator. Oh year, one timing belt along with a water pump. Easy to work on too.

After the 1,500 was retired, I picked up a '76 1200 sedan, (had a trunk), for $100 but it had a rod knock. I ended up by going on a foreign work contract and never got around to fixing it. It was relatively rust free too...
JT
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wrote:

I had a Gen II, CVCC, definitely had a manual choke. I lived in Atlanta, but drove it in snow country frequently. Never had a problem.

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