Yaris, Scion xD, Honda Fit - no water temp gauge

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Steve wrote:


like the ignorant average driver that thinks the "temp gauge" in his car is actually telling him anything other than "normal" and "too hot"?

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On Apr 4, 1:56 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote: snip

I'm gonna challenge your assumption that the Corolla, although somewhat more expensive to purchase, delivering 26/35 mpg and with historically outstanding reliability, will cost more to operate and insure than the smaller cars on your list over the course of 250,000 miles.
You might want to test drive these cars on the same roads and at the same speeds as your daily commute.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Many present vehicles have software which "smooths" the response of the water temperature gauge so much that is practically is an idiot light.
Not having one wouldn't be a deal breaker for me.
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On Apr 4, 1:56 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

In my experience most drivers glance at the temp gauge rarely, if at all. It is for that reason that most cars equipped with a temperature gauge also come with a linked idiot light and sometimes a text-based screen to alert the driver. I don't see where the loss of a temperature gauge is any big deal for most drivers.
If you want a temp gauge, just add an aftermarket one on one of those baseline cars you mentioned.
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How is such an aftermarket temp gauge installed - under the hood, and how is it mounted on the dashboard/instrument panel? How much does it cost?
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On Apr 23, 10:38 am, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

You need to locate the temperature sending unit on the block and find a place in the interior to mount a gauge.
When you buy a gauge you should get a sending unit with two connections - one for the idiot light and one for the gauge. Hook them both up, wire the gauge and you are off and running. The hardest part will be finding a keyed power source for the gauge and a proper ground. It's really pretty straightforward if you have worked on cars before. If not, just have a local mechanic do the work.
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John S. wrote:

just use the engine computer to give temperature output. its sensor is best located to get the best reading, unlike a bolt-on.

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In article

Or, just buy the gauge that plugs into the standard OBD II port and displays lots of things.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

There are a couple of different types. An old-style purely mechanical gauge has a pressure bulb that gets screwed into a coolant passage in the engine block (you can often "tee" a fitting in so that it shares the same coolant port as the car's own idiot light sensor. A capillary tube runs to the gauge mounted on or under the dash. These are usually very accurate, even for the cheap models under $25. The drawback is that you have to be very careful in routing the capillary tube because if it becomes kinked or broken, the gauge is useless. You also have to have a large enough hole in the firewall to feed the pressure bulb and capillary through.
Electric gauges have an electric sensor that goes in the coolant, just like the capillary bulb. But you can install it, and then route the power and sense wires however you need to. They're more expensive, and the lower end ones are not always very accurate.
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Steve wrote:

what's the point when the engine computer can output the data for you????
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The point is to have a nice clean interface that you can look at every few minutes when you scan the panel.
The engine computer can give you all kinds of useful information, but if you have to page through a dozen menus to get it, you will never see it in time. And information you never see is not useful. --scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

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Permit me to summarize this thread.
Mr. Nagel points out that having realtime information from gauges permits one to predict possible impending failures.
Mr. Beam points out that most drivers are drooling mouthbreathers who should never be allowed behind the wheel of a car.
Both of these statements are true. However, the second statement does not invalidate the first one.
Most drivers don't watch the gauges, it's true. But most drivers don't stop at stop signs or signal turns either. Does that mean we should take all the signs down and stop requiring cars to have turn signals? I do not believe so. --scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

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Scott Dorsey wrote:

but what he doesn't say is that these gauges do absolutely /nothing/ to prevent them!!! a gauge may tell you your tire is flat, but it does nothing to stop that nail puncturing it.

that's not true. i merely point out that because the geeks that design these things /know/ what they're doing, they /know/ that the vehicle remains in spec, given correct maintenance, for its lifetime. the instrumentation that does their initial homework is /not/ necessary for the consumer to operate it. just like elmo's refrigerator analogy.
heck, /i'm/ mr anal retentive when it comes to my car, and /i/ don't need gauges to run the thing. test it, sure, but not run it.

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What you get in the dash is a function of industrial design and marketing. The engineers who developed the product have practically nothing to do with those decisions.
As far as what those 'geeks' do, well, the ones I know tend to add the gauges they want even if they are hacked in and laying on the floor ;)
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jim beam wrote:

HAhahahahahahaha! you've never owned a GM car then have you.
Their engineers may know what they're doing, but they don't get to do the *right* thing. Their cars are crap.
nate

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replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
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Scott Dorsey wrote:

Well worded Scott!
One probably shoul reap what they sow...
<G> \ JT
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"One" is singular. "They" is plural.
One should reap what he sows.
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