05 Elantra GLS auto dead battery twice

Hi, We have had the car for over 30k miles with no trouble. Took it to the dealer after the second time when the battery was dead. They tested the battery and alternator and gave us the printed results ()no
problems, battery and alternator okay) and there were no codes. We jumped it both times.
Dealer said next time, don't jump it, call them.
Both times the car was left four days without being used. We need the car for work and can't leave it for three or four days (to see if it happens again) for several months.
Any ideas would help. Thanks, Dermott
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Dermott,
Some new car batteries only last for a few years. I would simply replace the battery with a new one - cost should be $50 to $75 maximum by doing it yourself. Or, AutoZone, Advance Auto Parts, or any of the other national chains, will check and replace your battery for you. Generally, the replacement batteries available are superior to any of the batteries originally installed in a new car.
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Still have the original battery in my 2001 Elantra. It has run down a couple of times requiring jump starts when we have left it at the airport for three weeks. Otherwise still performs great. BTW we live in a climate that has no extremes of temperatures in summer or winter.
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----------------- YOU MUST BE LIVING IN WONDERLAND ! -----------------------
Elantra batteries? Yeah!
I HAVE A 2004 ELANTRA GLS, AND THE BATTERY IS almost impossible to replace and service!
IF you can find one outside a dealer, where they're 40-percent more costly. And dealers don't install for free. More like for $50!
Actually, Hyundai DOESN'T want you even try to:
1) Check the fluid level in the cells.
2) Check the body and terminals for corrosion.
3) Remove the old battery and install a new one.
These tasks are almost impossible for the average motorist BECAUSE THE BATTERY SITS IN AN ENCLOSED, SEALED CASE! You can't see much less inspect the cell fluid levels. And half of the bolts under the hood on the driver's side have to be removed to free-up the battery.
See, Hyundai wants you to go to a HYUNDAI DEALER, where a battery costs $90, plus up to $50 more to install it. And at most Hyundai dealers I know, you have to leave your car for an entire day -- then hope it's ready when you return in the late afternoon or early evening.
"Aw, we're sorry, but you see we got real busy and couldn't get to yours. But tomorrow!"
AdvanceAuto Parts, AutoZone, Olympic Auto Parts, and Batteries Plus sell the same battery for $52 to $69, some including free installation.
Only problem? They can't get a sufficient supply of them to keep 'em in stock!
And that's what your conniving, inscrutable Hyundai folks want -- to force you to spend more on a new battery than a normal car owner would expect. Parts companies list the Elantra batteries as "special." And that they are!
Additionally, the OWNER'S MANUAL has neither a diagram or instructions for accessing and servicing your Hyundai Elantra battery. Just a one- paragraph entry that says, in effect, Be careful when servicing the battery."
I've had my 2004 Elantra GLS for 3 years and the battery is already shot. Needless to say, with problems also with the air bags, brakes, power locks, and engine noise and vibration, I've bought my last Hyundai product!
My advice to Hyundai? Hold up on building those factories in the U.S. Too many one-time customers could make for sluggish, then anemic, sales.
------------------------
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Best news yet is that you won't buy another one. It means you will go spew about some other brand. There are way too many of us happy owners out here for you to matter.
;-)
On Tue, 14 Aug 2007 12:24:11 -0700, StoneMeThenBurnMe

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Did the dealer also check parasitic draw (the current flow when the car is off)? If that's too large, the battery will run down if the car isn't operated for a significant period of time.
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Hi HT, how much should we see for the parasitic current? I assume that's to run the computer system. On my son's Jetta, it is 350 ma.
Thanks
Tom

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350 mA is huge. That'll run a battery down overnight.
On most newer cars, it's usually 30mA or less. If you have more than 50mA, that's cause for concern. If you have more than 100mA, there's definitely a problem.
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My college age nephew's 1990 Toyota Camery was around 30 ma. He drove the car so infrequently that he went through a couple of batteries before we figured out what was going on. I added a relay to shut off the dome light circuit when the key was out of the ignition and got the current draw down to 6 ma. He never had a problem after that.
Dan

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Thanks for the advice, teh dealer stated the battery had some bad cells and replaced it under a prorated warranty. Thanks again, Dermott
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