2005 Santa Fe Accelerator

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Auto manufacturers can control emissions better with electronic throttle. You stomp the pedal, the computer opens the throttle plate gradually as it
sees fit. Prevents a large amount of fuel dumping. Then again, it also can prevent the car from doing what you want it to. I'm not sold on the idea that electronic throttle is the way to go.
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Given the sudden acceleration issue I've described, this might be a case of unrealized potential...at least in this one instance.
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hyundaitech wrote:

But even cars with cable actuated throttles can do this as the throttle only controls the butterfly (air flow), the computer still controls the fuel injection.
Matt
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Mike Marlow wrote:

Yes, even though my degrees are in CS and EE, even I don't think that EVERYTHING has to be controlled with electronics and software! It is like the headlights on my 03 Dodge minivan. They are controlled via the BCM rather than directly switched like my 96 Plymouth minivan. There is a noticeable delay between flipping the switch and having the lights change from low to high and back. I'm not really sure that having the computer dim the headlights is really progress, especially when there is a detectable delay. They either should use a faster processor or go back to a relay.
I assume the Sonata is controlled by computer also, but I haven't noticed any significant delay in the dimmer switch, unlike the throttle which has a noticeable delay and then too much gain once it begins to move. It also seems to be rate sensitive. It feels, to me anyway, that the faster I move the throttle the faster it responds, but not linearly with speed as one would expect. It seems that moving the throttle twice as fast gets 3-4 times the rate of RPM increase.
Matt
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Presumably, the lower compression results in better durability.
Realistically, this powertrain has been around in the U.S. since 2001 (only since late 2003MY in the Santa Fe) and there have been a few improvements in that time, mostly in the transmission and throttle controls. This makes it difficult for me to make any kind of experiential conclusion in terms of real long-term reliability. In my opinion, there have been very few serious problems, but I've also seen more issues than I'd like with the variable intake and throttle motors. I'm currrently replacing the block in an XG because of an issue with coolant in one of the cylinders, but this is also the only vehicle with this powertrain that I've seen with such a serious engine issue that wasn't owner-induced.
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That may well be true (at least theoretically), but with gasoline at $2+/gal (and almost certain to at LEAST double over the next decade) it's going to take an awful lot of increased durability to even come close to offseting that extra cost due to decreased fuel efficiency...especially considering how long most engines go now days without any significant maintenance anyway. Add in the fact that my new powertrain is warranteed for 10 years and I fail to see the benefit of sacrificing mileage (especially when the vehicle is newer, smaller and ligher) for some potential reduction in engine cylinder wear.
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Update: After my 2nd tank of fuel my mileage has improved to 17.3 mpg. Nowhere near where it should be yet, but a positive trend anyway.
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