2006 Elantra owners

Page 2 of 3  
Matt Whiting wrote:


Oh please, please, please Matt, share your wisdom with us! Please do!
Clutch life varies from one brand and model of car to another and with the type of driving the car sees. While a vehicle that's driven predominantly on the highway may easily get 200K on a clutch, one that sees lots for urban "stall-and-crawl" commuting never will. To make the statement that 100K miles is poor clutch life without any other information is simply ridiculous.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Brian Nystrom wrote:

OK, but only because you asked for it. :-)

Of course, clutch life varies for many reasons as does brake life. However, I believe that driver technique is the dominant factor in both cases. Here are some things I've seen over the years that contribute to clutch disk wear and throw-out bearing wear.
Throw-out bearing:
Sitting at a stop light for two minutes with the transmission in gear holding the clutch down. This adds dramatically to the wear of the t-bearing as compared to shifting into neutral and letting the clutch out. Some claim the latter is a safety hazard as you couldn't get out of the way of someone about to rear-end you, but I think this is a specious argument at best. Few folks could get away from a person who they knew was going to rear-end them even if they had the car in gear.
Clutch disk:
The main culprit I've seen is folks that use the clutch to hold the car in position on a hill at a stop light or sign rather than using the brakes. I'm still amazed at how often I see people doing this. A minute or two of this probably wears the clutch as much as 5,000 miles of normal driving and generates lots of heat that can cause warping of the presssure plate or even flywheel.
Making fast starts all of the time and using too much RPM at start-out. I'll be the first to admit that the Hyundai throttle and clutch makes smooth starts much more difficult than they should be. My Chevy truck idles at about 650 RPM. I can smoothly start out with that vehicle and never have the tach above 1,000 RPM prior to full clutch engagement, unless I'm on a steep hill. Obviously, the 4 cylinder in the Sonata takes a little more RPM, but even so I can usually start out without exceeding 1200 or so. I routinely ride with people who rev to 2,000+ rpm at every start.
Not matching engine and input shaft RPM when shifting. Once you get familiar with a car, it is fairly easy to time upshifts so that you release the clutch just as the engine RPM is falling to the figure required for the next higher gear. Again, the Hyundai electronic throttle makes this more difficult as the "dashpot" function programmed into it is way to aggressive and slows upshifts, but it can be done if you don't get in too big a hurry. Same thing with downshifting. A quick blip of the throttle before engaging the clutch on higher RPM downshifts helps a lot.
These are the biggest things I see routinely from folks who get poor clutch life. I'm sure I missed a few and maybe you can add another tip or two.
Matt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have to disagree with this. How will this affect throwout bearing life? The biggest threat to throwout bearing life is people who leave their foot on the clutch pedal while driving, taking up the slop and laying on the throwout bearing - what we used to call riding the clutch. Think about it - what is coupling the tranny to the engine while the clutch is disengaged?

This sure would eat up a clutch fast, but our experiences differ Matt. I can't think of many times at all that I've seen this. What strikes me as more common is folks who aren't comfortable with releasing the clutch on a hill and won't come off the clutch quickly, at rpm's that are a bit high, in attempt to make the take off smooth. (slipping the clutch). They end up with a lot of unnecessary slippage.

Notwithstanding a pure dump of the clutch, a fast start isn't going to do any appreciable damage to a clutch. What will eat the clutch face is attempting to ease it too much and ending up with too much time with a partial clutch engagement. This will eat up a clutch even at low rpm's.

Matching rpm's has nothing really to do with clutch wear. The clutch is already disengaged by the time the driver attempts the shift. Today's synchro's (for the past 30 years or so...) have made a moot point of timing the engine to the tranny. If you do go to the extent of timing the two, the clutch becomes unnecessary - either up or down shifting. It becomes quite possible to upshift and downshift without the clutch, and very smoothly at that. But... this is a function of angle cut tranny teeth, and has nothing to do with the clutch. Any miniscule affect on the clutch face that *may* be in effect from blipping the engine probably wouldn't amount to a scant few hundred miles in the life of a clutch plate.
OTR truck trannys, multi-speed rear ends, etc. share little in common with a passenger car. The teeth are cut differently, and like a race car, the tranny is really intended to be shifted without the clutch once under way.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Matt Whiting wrote:

Agreed.
I don't see it that often, but often enough to realize that people aren't being taught properly.

True. Even with the stupid valve removed from the slave cylinder, it's not the best clutch I've used. For that matter, the clutch in my old Excel was better.

That'll tend to wear things a bit.

That's just a normal part of driving a manual tranny and it more or less just happens during typical driving. The only time it's even and issue is when driving aggressively.

Yes, the dashpot function really sucks. I used to disable the dashpots on my older cars, but that's not an option anymore.

I used to be a big fan of heel-and-toe downshifting back when I tended to drive my cars harder. These days, I only downshift when I need to and never use the transmission to slow the car. As a wise man once said: "Brake pads are much cheaper than a transmission rebuild."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hondas may be great cars -- I've owned a two -- but, I would suggest if one is considering a new generation Civic, go over to the 2006+ Civic forum. Quite a number of owners are not happy with their new cars due to the notorious "Lug Bug" problem. It seems like a fair number of owners are experiencing this problem, as yet not fully explained by Honda.
I'm happy with our new 2006 Elantra. No complaints after three months of ownership.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don Allen wrote:

What is the lug bug problem?
I've only owned one Honda, an 84 Accord purchased new, and it was a piece of crap. The top end of the engine self-destructed with 72,000 miles on it. It is the only car I've owned in 30+ years that didn't make 100K miles.
Matt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Matt Whiting wrote:

I always thought Honda made good stuff. I test drove a Civic before I bought my Elantra. I didn't like the Civic that much and the Elantra has a better warranty. I've also had very good luck with Hyundai, so I stuck with them.
My wife's Toyata Corolla put a rod though the side of the engine block at 98,000. That engine was badly abused because she didn't change the oil and stuff like she should have.
- Mooron
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mooron wrote:

Similarly, I originally planned to buy a 2006 Corolla, but the driving position in them was terrible. And then when I found I could get a Sonata for virtually the same price, the decision was fairly easy.
Matt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Apparently, the new Civic has a problem either with an engine/chassis resonance or an engine "lugging" problem. The users on Edmunds.com forums have been complaining quite a bit about this for some time. It appears to affect primarily the Civic with the AT transmission. Some theorize that in Honda's search for the holy grail in fuel economy, when the transmission is in 5th gear, the engine is turning too low of an RPM (especially in town), and causes the engine to lug, i.e. too high of a gear for engine RPMs. For some time now, the posters have been calling it the "Lug Bug" problem.
Others think it's due to an inherent engine/chassis resonance problem. It's not in their minds as it seems Honda has acknowleged the problem exists, but has yet to propose a fix.
One thing is for certain, if you think there are dissatisfied Hyundai owners, you will be surprised how many new 2006 Civic owners are complaining in a very vocal way. Frankly, it surprised me, and I drove a Civic for a number of years, and had excellent experience with it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don Allen wrote:

Just shows you that every new design carries with it some risk of a problem or two, no matter who the manufacturer is.
Matt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
so with all the problelms honda has had, trans mission failures, oil fires, ignition failures that mean its also a car worth concidering? learn to drive stick properly.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My daughter has a honda. on 2nd transmission. neighbor across the street has an acura, now on 3rd tranny! they must be great cars Ron!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have a 2003, with auto trans. 35,000 miles on it. perfect car. 3000 mile trip got between 32 and 37 MPG two people and ALLL our luggage! who buys a stick shift anyway?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Deck wrote:

I do! The main reason I own a Hyundai rather than a Chrysler is that the Chrysler car I liked only came with an automatic. Three of the four vehicles I know own are stick shift (1986 Jeep Comanche, 1994 Chevy K1500 - which I plow snow with, and 2006 Sonata). Only my wife's Dodge Grand Caravan is automatic - and I try to avoid driving it! :-)
Matt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Do you have to get out and take the gas cap off in front of the windshield before you can fill 'er up.:-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
One more thing about stick shifts here in Southern Calif. driving in heavy freeway and city traffic you get your exercise. both hands and both feet moving at all times!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Deck wrote:

Only smart people.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Captain Ron wrote:

A clutch failure after 17,000 miles is absurd. Something was seriously wroing with the car or your driving habits. My guess is you don't know how to drive a stick properly.
I put 135,000 miles on an Excel, 105,000 on an Accent and now have an Elantra. I've had absoulutely no clutch or transmission problems.
- Mooron
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
in defence. to his response.. I did have an 04 Elantra GT that had the clutch assembly replaced due to a bent throughout bearing.. clutch was fine.. throughout bearing was bent so they replaced the whole assembly. What I find is funny is this is the first time I have seen him post here and its only to SLAM Hyundai.. maybe he should have spent another 5K and got his Honda..;-)
Pete..

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Perhaps I should have spent the 5k extra and purchased a Honda. The last Honda I owned went 125k on the first clutch, a fine machine. This clutch problem is not operator error. I have owned at least 10 cars since 1972 that have had manual transmissions, and all the clutches went at least 60-100k miles. If you do your homework, you'll find that the Hyundai clutch problem is posted all over the Internet, that Hyundai is well aware of it, and that they refuse to fix it. Yes, it's a value car, but where is the value in spending $1,000.00 every 20,000 miles to replace a clutch? You bet I'm slammin Hyundai. They're cheap because they're cheap. Lousy clutches aren't the only problem.
Captain Ron
Pete & Cindy wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.