2006 Sonata lost another window motor/regulator

Well, after losing the passenger side electric window a time ago while still under warranty, I just now lost the driver side. I am now beginning to see where Hyundai saved money so they could undersell Honda
and Toyota. Since I have 65,000 miles now I am pretty sure I am out of warranty on this item.
Unlike the passenger side which got slower and slower on cranking up the window until it just wouldn't go anymore, the driver's side just suddenly died. I lowered the window yesterday and it went down normally, but when I tried to raise it ... nothing at all.
Has anyone else had this problem? I am not sure if there is a fuse to check, but I assume all windows share a fuse and the other three work fine. I will start with fuses though this afternoon. I suspect either the motor or the switch. Has anyone had their door panel off on a Sonata? Is it hard to remove? Any special tools required to remove door handles or pop body clips? If you have bought a replacement motor or switch, did you buy online or at the dealer?
Matt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not just Hyundai. I've lost windows on GM cars too. The regulators are cheaply made and fail far too often. I have the rear windows of my Buick propped up with a piece of wood in the door.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed Pawlowski wrote:

work just fine!
I have had two minivans and the first (1996 Grand Voyager) went 10 years and 180,000 miles with no window failures either main doors or rear pop-outs. My current minivan (2003 Grand Caravan) did lose the drivers door, but that was at well over 100,000 miles.
Ok, now here is the really strange thing. After sitting in my garage over night, I tried the window again this morning "just for grins" and it went up like nothing had ever happened! What is what that???
Yes, I did try last night turning the car off, turning the key back on, and starting the car again and nothing made that window budge. Then this morning it cranks up like nothing was ever wrong. I assume these may be computer controlled as on my Chrysler's so I am wondering if the computer lost it mind or something. I'll have to see if this recurs. Anyone had anything like this happen?
Matt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Can't say that I have, but that sounds like a thermal protector in the motor itself. Of course, that should be tripping anyway, but were you in hotter than "normal" places yesterday?
Eric
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Eric G. wrote:

No, not terribly hot at all. Mid 80s maybe.
Matt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This would be the cheapest thing to try. I do this as a regular maintenance item every 3 or 4 months. Try lubricating the window tracks with Teflon or silicone spray. Run the window up and down a few times right away. Could be there is a bind and the motor thermals out??? Larry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah, Larry may have something there if it isn't the heat itself. And above, I meant to say it SHOULDN'T be tripping, even from the heat if it was excessive. Come to think of it, if it reset itself it really could only be the thermal protection on the motor (assuming it has it, and it should). Could also be indicitive of a motor wearing out.
Eric
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Several years ago, pre 2002, I had a similar problem with my Honda Accord driver's side window. The problem turned out to be cold solder joints in the controller box inside the door panel. After applying a bit of "brute force and ignorance" to the door panel I was at least able to reach inside and remove the controller box and re-solder the cold joints. That fixed the problem and it stayed fixed until I sold the car and got my 2002 Elantra. Knock wood, the Elantra windows are still working fine.
I have noticed though that the remote entry key fob appears to be operating a bit slower that when it was new. I just replaced the battery in the fob but it doesn't seem to have fixed the slowness. I'm now waiting for the the keyless entry to become keyless non-entry. :-) At which point I may have to go with the large brick entry method.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sounds like a window motor to me, Matt. One of the modes of failure is that grease gets on the contacts, preventing the motor from working. Often, as the temperature increases (or some other external force such as opening and shutting the door, even), the window motor works again. When the problem is occurring, a quick and dirty diagnostic method is to hold the window switch up or down as appropriate to attempt to operate the window and slam the door while holding the switch. If the window suddenly starts working, you're near 100% it's the motor.
I haven't repeatedly replaced window motors in these cars, but it's a rather simple repair. As I recall, you simply remove the trim panel, unbolt and unplug the motor from the inner door panel, and remove.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
hyundaitech wrote:

Thanks. The issue has no recurred, but I suspect it will. I will definitely try the slamming the door diagnostic.
Does the trim panel use the normal plastic push pins to hold it in place? Any special tools required for disassembly?
Matt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Pretty much normal disassembly. There are some Phillips screws under cover-- one at the pull grip, one at the interior handle, and 3 or 4 under small round covers. And if I remember correctly, two at the bottom that are coverless. (Once upon a time, I could actually tell people where all this stuff was. Now, there are so many different models, I just look around at the common places each time I need to remove a door panel.) Once you've got all the screws out and the triangular mirror garnish pulled off, pull outward at the bottom of the door panel to snap the trim panel loose and then lift off of the sill at the top. Pretty standard stuff.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
hyundaitech wrote:

Thanks. So far, no recurrence. Strange...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.