2007 Santa Fe Maintenance

I have a 2007 Santa Fe 3.3L. One of the items in the glove box was a booklet called Maintenance Log. Several of the items listed aroused my attention. The first is Valve Clearance, which is supposed to be
inspected at 60,000 miles. Since a lot of parts have to be removed from the top of the engine to actually "inspect" this item, I would expect the cost to be considerable. I asked the service manager at the dealer what this inspection involved and his reply was, essentially, "these things last a long time and may never need service, so all we do at 60K is listen to the engine running and if we don't hear anything, it's ok." I hope he's right.
The second item is "Fuel Tank Air Filter", which is supposed to be inspected at 15,000 and replaced at 30,000 miles. If this refers to the fuel filter which is located on top of the fuel tank, I think it might be rather expensive to replace, since access requires removal of the second row of seats, which is attached with a lot of bolts, etc. Otherwise, what the heck is a fuel tank air filter?
Am I being overly nervous, or are we in for a serious monetary shock when we take these vehicles in for routine maintenance in a few years?
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Normally if the valve clearance changes, it will increase due to wear and you wind up with a valve tap. Most newer engines have hydraulic lifters that don't require periodic adjustment -- if something gets out of spec you wind up with the aforementioned tapping sound.

You've got me there -- possibly a filter on a vent line?

I think you'll find that the 30,000 and 60,000 mile service tends to be expensive on most late-model cars, particularly at dealer service departments. You can save some money if you have a good independent shop available. Just be sure to document everything for warranty purposes.
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I hope he is right also. Here is a partial prodedure from the HMAservice.com site
VALVE CLEARANCE INSPECTION AND ADJUSTMENT
NOTE Inspect and adjust the valve clearance when the engine is cold (Engine coolant temperature : 20C) and cylinder head is installed on the cylinder block. 1.. Remove the engine cover. 2.. Remove air cleaner assembly. 3.. Remove the surge tank. 4.. Remove the cylinder head cover. a.. Disconnect the ignition coil connector and remove the ignition coil. a.. Disconnect the breather hose(A) from the cylinder head cover. Loosen the cylinder head cover bolts and then remove the cover(A) and gasket. b.. Set No.1 cylinder to TDC/compression. a.. Turn the crankshaft pulley and align its groove with the timing mark "T" of the lower timing chain cover. Check that the mark(A) of the camshaft timing sprockets are in straight line on the cylinder head surface as shown in the illustration. If not, turn the crankshaft one revolution (360)
NOTE Do not rotate engine counterclockwise
Using a thickness gauge, measure the clearance between the tappet and the base circle of camshaft. Record the out-of-specification valve clearance measurements. They will be used later to determine the required replacement adjusting tappet. Valve clearance Specification Engine coolant temperature : 20C [68F] Limit Intake : 0.10 ~ 0.30mm (0.0039 ~ 0.0118in.) Exhaust : 0.20 ~ 0.40mm (0.0079 ~ 0.0157in.) a.. Turn the crankshaft pulley one revolution (360) and align the groove with timing mark "T" of the lower timing chain cover.
NOTE Do not rotate engine counterclockwise a.. Check only valves indicated as shown. [NO. 4 cylinder : TDC/compression]. Measure the valve clearance.

I see the air filter at the top of the filler neck on the Sonata, but I don't see it listed on the Santa Fe component blowup. The tank air filter is different from the fuel filter. I've not looked at mine yet and it is too damned cold to run out tonight to check.
If you don't have one yet, sign up for a free account at www.hmaservice.com Lots of good information there. Be sure to check the Site Requirements and get the SVG viewer from Adobe (also free) so you can see the photos and drawings.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



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"Edgar MacArthur" wrote:

The valve lash system in use on your Santa Fe is little different from that which Hyundai has been using on many of their engines for some time now. I cannot recall a case when Ive seen one of these engines require a valve adjustment due to normal wear.
"Edgar MacArthur" wrote:

of
I believe theyre talking about the canister filter. If I recall correctly, it must be accessed from under the vehicle and requires a significant amount of time and effort. I doubt any service departments maintenance schedule will include this. Nothing serious will happen if the filter gets clogged. Your check engine lamp will turn on, and you may have difficulty fueling your vehicle. I say have it diagnosed and repaired at that time. Itll probably wind up saving you money in the long run.
My guess is that this item is included in the maintenance schedule to remove any doubt as to whether its considered a maintenance item. That way, if you have a problem because of the filter, its clear that its your responsibility after 15K miles.
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