A/C needs charge in 03 sonata

I have an 2003 Sonata 67000 miles on it. Noticed today that my a/c is not cold like it used to be. Was wondering if it is easy and cheaper to add what
is needed? Any tips or advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
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In a way, yes it is easy. Kits with the required R-134A are available at auto parts stores everywhere, and most Hyundais make it pretty clear where your low pressure and high pressure hose access points (in the AC hoses) are.
But if it is not running as cool as it used to, the refrigerant had to go somewhere. And if you just do a simple recharge, there is just as good of a chance that the charge won't last all that long, because you have a leak.
Detecting and fixing leaks are best left to A/C specialists. Most reputable repair shops have a good A/C man, and some relatively simple (and fairly inexpensive) tests to check for leaks.
What they find, then, and what that might cost are another matter. But most of those repairs are not the "do-it-yourself" type.
Hope this helps.
Tom Wenndt

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Thanks for your reply. So in other words, your saying that chances are I have a leak because the a/c does not run as cold as it used too? That scares me!! My last car was a nightmare. I bought a brand new 1992 cavalier. After using the car for 10 months, the a/c was not cool anymore. Brought it to Firestone to get it looked at. Was in the waiting room watching this guy(creepy looking) put it up on a lift, took a crowbar type and started banging something underneath the car. 10 minutes later, he came out to me and said I have a hole in my condenser. The cost: 900.00 to replace it. Being a college student, I had no money to fix it. I went 2 years with out A/C. That summer of 1994 went to jiffy lube for an oil change. The guy ask me if I wanted to charge my a/c. I told him that it had a hole in the condenser. He said he will check it out. He came out to me and said that he added the Freon and there was no leakage. I could not believe I had a/c!!! That car today which has 489,500 miles on it still has a/c working. I gave the car to my nephew!! That incident makes me very captious and it really dampened my trust toward ANY mechanic..

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There is no question that the number one thing all of us could use, in the world of autos, is a reliable and reasonably priced mechanic and/or repair shop.
Sorry for your experience. I am even more sorry that it happened at Firestone, since in my community, Firestone is probably THE most reputable and well respected repair place in the area. They have helped me with a lot of things I can't do myself. If they knew where this place of yours was, the people at Firestone here would make trouble to the national headquarters, because they realize that all Firestone's are tarnished with a bad experience at one.
As I said - the A/C charge kit is fairly inexpensive and fairly easy to do. Try it, and if you are unsure, go to Autozone or someplace like it where they can tell you exactly what to do on your car. If it works, you have cold A/C, and the satisfaction of having done it yourself.
If it only works for a while, then gets "un-cold" again, then you know you have a leak. Then ask friends and what have you for recommendations on a reputable shop who can do a relatively inexpensive dye test that will quickly tell them (and you, when they show you) where the leak actually is. My first guess would be a hose - still not the cheapest part in the world (A/C parts never are), but a whole lot better than a compressor or condenser.
Hope this helps.
Tom Wenndt

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Rev. Tom Wenndt wrote:

You already know you have a leak the first time it quits working if it quit due to low refrigerant. Why throw good money after bad with a DIY recharge kit before you've found and fixed the leak?
Matt
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It's worth a shot. It's not uncommon for cars to leak off a can or less of refrigerant. At the cost of throwing a can at it in the early summer, versus repair bills, it often makes sense to just refill it. If it's a small leak as I described, a mere $5 per year is all it takes. I've had to do that on my truck for a few years now. Doubtful you can get any AC problem fixed for what I've put into R134A.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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As a residential/commerical HVAC Tech, i would highly suggest you DO NOT touch your cars a/c system yourself ; while stores may offer 'do it yourself refrigerant kits' ... they are potentially dangerous in the hands of the inexperienced. Get a shot of R134 in the eyes or skin and youre in trouble. Further, you dont just 'fill er up' with freon...it has to be precisely put into the a/c system and you have to know how to read the pressure guages properly . Some things youre better off paying to have done so y ou dont mess it up further.
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