Anyone ever replaced an A/C compressor on an 2020 Sonata GLS?

For the past couple year, my mechanic's recharged my system around April with the expensive stuff that has that sealer leak stuff in it and it's lasts me for at least 9 months. As usual, March rolls around
and my system is dry. While my mechanic does a good job, it's $85 a pop. so far, $170. I'm thinking of replacing the A/C compressor with one of those aftermarket Halla HS18 models as I can get a new one for around $188 which is dirt cheap. Recharging would get me another year but now I'd already have spent more than it would cost to have a new A/C compressor put in and have the system recharged a third time.
So, has anyone undertaken replacing a compressor? My mechanic said it looks like a pain in the butt that potentially involves removing the radiator but he is not sure. Would I be better off just taking the part to a Hyundai dealership and have them install it? One of the place I can get the compressor from states that in replacing the compressor it is recommended to also replace the Accumulator or Filter Drier. Potentially the orifice tube (if equipped) too? Anyone?
cheers,
- Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]
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Sorry, I meant a 2002.

- Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]
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wrote:

Are you sure it is the compressor leaking?
See if you have any radiator/AC guys around and get a price from them. I had one compressor replaced and I should have just dumped the car. I barely lasted one season, was replaced under warranty and did not last the next season. Don't go for cheap, go for good. Especially for a 2020 model since you will have it for a long time :)
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Ahem, 2002, not 2020.
Yes, 100% positive the compressor is leaking. Saw it with my own eyes. it was a slow leak but a leak nonetheless. Probably a gasket or o-ring. It seems even the fancy leak-stop stuff couldn't help. Stupid that a $1 o-ring or gasket that's needed to fix it cannot be bought and you have to buy a whole damn compressor. I'm sure I can fix it myself with an o-ring or gasket kit if I can find one.
The Halla is made in Korea which I would hope is much better than Hecho in China. I could get a new genuine OEM one but it's $559 + shipping and really there's no guarantee it'll be any better than a new aftermarket Halla model. 1 year warranty on an OEM model for $559, um...no thanks. The Halla for $188 has a 1 year warranty too. You do the math.
I mean, my current compressor lost all freon from a leak by the winter of 2009 and I bought my car in late 2001 so it lasted just shy of 8 years. I don't think that's particularly great considering there are tons of cars on the road with original compressors twice that age. I'm not a heavy A/C user, even in hot Chicago summers so 8 years seems a bit short in terms of life span. Maybe I just got a bum model.
At 144k, it's not worth investing tons of money into a car that's going on 11 years. But, my car runs good and it's got to last me for a few more years so I have no reason to believe at $188 it wouldn't last less than 4 years. All the other aftermarket Compressors are Chinese (Four Seasons) and this is one of the few if *only* Korean-made ones.
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wrote:

I'm disappointed. I though you had the 20-20 Perfect Vision Cruiser

I did. It was fast and easy too. I have to wonder if what you are buying is really the same as the OEM, just with a different price tag. Huge markups like that are common.
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This is the part I am looking at: http://www.acpartshouse.com/showitem.aspx?id 6158&name=New%20HS18%20A%2FC%20Compressor&
Made by HCC Halla Climate Control of Korea. From what I am reading, they are either the ones making the parts for Kia and Hyundai or sourcing them. It's also possible this is just rebranded OEM. http://www.hcc.co.kr/english/index.asp
- Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]
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I,ve never worked on a compressor so I may be in error here. Being an old bloke though Ive made many gaskets out of sheets of gasket material and O rings come in many standard sizes. You can make non standard sizes out of Oring strips and superglue ends together to get diameter right. Any chance of dismantling the compressor and making a gasket? Most auto part dealers will sell sheets of gasket material in different thicknesses. Good luck

http://www.acpartshouse.com/showitem.aspx?id 6158&name=New%20HS18%20A%2FC%20Compressor&
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My hunch is that it will be easy to dismantle. Many place that will sell you a new compressor will ask for the core (read: the old compressor) which they will turn around and replace the gasket or bad o-ring and turn around and sell it as refurb or remanufactured for $300. I figure if I can do it myself, I'll have a backup in case the new on I buy craps out.
I have seen that gasket material and I know o-rings are a dime a dozen so I cannot imagine it costing more than $5 to fix.

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I suspect your pricing would be about spot on and if it doesnt work out you,ve done $5. Good luck.

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I'm not sure if this is has been answered and deleted already, but this is the 64 thousand dollar question here.
There are several issues. First, A/C systems should not be serviced with sealer. It can damage many of the components of the A/C system, not to mention the recovery and recycling equipment.
Next, what has been done to identify the leak? If your mechanic/shop is as good as you imply, then they should have installed leak detection dye the first time they recharged the system so they could locate the leak the next time you came back with low refrigerant. If they're not attempting to find the leak, they're simply perpetuating their payday and your pain.
The largest difficulty in replacing the compressor for a DIYer, because if the special equipment required, is the evacuation and recharge of the system. Other than that, it's simply unplugging the compressor, removing the belt, unbolting and removing. I haven't done one of these in quite a while, so I don't recall whether it comes out the bottom or side, but I recall the compressor pretty much coming out easily.
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HT,
Thanks for your message. The leak I observed was shown to me by my mechanic. It's along the seam where, I assume, there is a gasket on the compressor. I was able to visibly observe small bubbling of fluid (freon?) emanating. I am 100% certain it is from the compressor and nowhere else. He has the right evac equipment and does a pro job of it. He also informed that there is no serviceable gasket or O-ring that can be replaced to fix the current compressor because that's the way they are designing this part these days.
The compressor is on the bottom right just to the left of the front right wheel. Is it also correct that in replacing the compressor that I should replace the receiver dryer? Some notes on sites selling aftermarket compressors state it is *highly* recommended to do this after opening the system during a compressor replacement because of the desiccant inside the drier risking absorbing the moisture in the air / opened system. Sounds right? Thanks much for replying.
- Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]
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I remember this instruction about replacing the drier, too.
I have an idea for you that may be worth a try, especially because of where the leak is coming from. A long time ago when we used a different refrigerant, I had my air conditioner filled and one can of refrigerant contained a sealant. This was after I'd bought the car and the AC system was empty. The fill lasted only two years. On a long drive, unable to stand the California heat any longer, I pulled into a large truck stop and had the AC refilled there. It was expensive, but I never had any trouble after that. They did something right.
What I'm getting at is that it may be worth trying a can of the stuff that I'd gambled on much earlier, only with the current R134. If it seals the pump housing nicely, you've saved a bundle. If not, you're not out much money.
Hyundai's price seems insane, but it's understandable. As a car maker, their parts have to go through their warehousing, stocking, inventory, and inventory tax procedures, as well as carrying their own warranty. This stuff costs money. I'd go the other route. My car now has imitation sideview mirrors, and the quality is surprisingly good, every bit as good as Hyundai's. In fact, I didn't like the original construction. The only thing that I gave up with the imitation was heating coils behind the glass. And since I live near the coast, this feature is irrelevant.
Good luck! Really.
Richard
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