ATTN; HYUNDAI-TECH (GDI Gasoline Direct Injection) Hyundai Engines

H.T.,
Id be interested in hearing a report from you on this particular engine thats found in the 2012-13 Accents . Specifically :
1. What sorts of problems are associated with this Engine during the warranty
period that youve run across or that other mechanics have ?
2. Does the design and installation of this engine in an Accent, lend itself to cleaning with Gunk and flushing with water on the exterior of the motor ?
3. Can a product like SeaFoam cleaner be safely on a GDI used thru the intake and fuel line in accordance to the dilution amount listed on the can (IE : 1.5 oz per gallon of gasoline in the tank) ?
Any other info that is good to know about the GDI Engine ? Is the reliability and longevity expected to be good ?
Thanks.
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On Saturday, December 29, 2012 4:59:37 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

1. Replaced a high pressure fuel pump or two. Otherwise, nothing. Still a relatively new engine. Too new to predict long-term reliability.
2. You can do this, but it's mostly unnecessary and risks damage to electronic components (as would be the case on just about any modern engine).
3. You can use these products, but realize there's only a couple rare maladies you'll fix. In 20 years of working on cars, I think I've recommended a top-engine cleaning on less than 10 cars. In my opinion, it's so rarely needed, whether you can do it is largely irrelevant.
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On Sat, 29 Dec 2012 13:59:37 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

That sort of struck me as odd. Back in the 1960's and even into the 80's, it was a common thing to have to clean oil from leaking valve cover gaskets, blow by from crankcase ventilation, other assorted grime that accumulated. Steam cleaning was common and some shops did it as a normal routine before starting any engine work. In recent years though, I've not had an engine that required a wash down at all. At best, a squirt bottle of cleaner and a couple of paper towels to get some dust off the top surfaces.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

and fuel line in accordance to the dilution amount listed on the can (IE : 1.5 oz per gallon of gasoline in the tank) ?

1. I don't have a GDI Hyundai, but I do have a GDI engine in my 2011 Chevy Equinox and it has been fine for nearly 20,000 miles now. There was a recall on something related to the controls for the variable valve mechanism, but it never caused a problem that I noticed. Apparently, it had the potential to cause a hesitation when starting out from a stop.
2. I would suspect as long as you use the proper precautions and don't use high pressure water such as from a car wash or pressure washer, you are probably fine. However, if your engine is getting that dirty, then you have an oil leak somewhere that you need to fix!
3. I suspect this is largely unnecessary. Most gunk in fuel systems is caused by fuel evaporating or otherwise mixing with air to oxidize. The GDI systems don't have the fuel making contact with air until inside the combustion chamber so not much place for traditional gum to form.
I suspect the reliability to be fine. Diesels have used this injection technology for a hundred years so it isn't really new technology, just a new application of well-proven technology. Sure, some of the hardware is new for the smaller engines, but the basic underlying technology is well-proven.
Matt
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On Sunday, December 30, 2012 7:53:41 AM UTC-6, Voyager wrote:

Thanks Matt and all who responded. I didnt know GDI was not a new technology. Thats interesting. I bring up the exterior engine cleaning because i live in the woods on a very sandy entrance road running a good half mile before reaching my residence and if it hasnt rained in awhile, the engine will get a thick film of brown residue of sand/dirt/grime all over it which will naturally end up on the various linkages, pivit points , throttle body, cables, etc...that require periodic lubrication . SO, I was wondering how using a low pressure residential hose with detergent for cleaning and flushing might possibly run down the ignition wires into the spark plug housings ,for instance ?
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I know what you mean about dirt getting on the engine. I live in Houston, TX and we have constant ongoing construction: roads, freeways, subdivisions, high rises, shopping malls, etc. We have daytime 20 mph wind here. Dust and dirt gets on everything. Leave the car out overnight and you can't see out the window. I wash my Kia engine every 6 months or so due to the dirt. Garden hose set to light spray, dribble dish detergent into the spray, let set a few minutes then spray it off. Be careful with the electrical connections. Yeah, water gets in the spark plug holes due to bad seals. Have to use the air compressor ONLY on the spark plug holes. Don't want to force water into the electrical connectors with air. I use WD40 on pivots afterward. Heavy oil collects dirt and ends up being a grinder.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Thats interesting. I bring up the exterior engine cleaning because i live in the woods on a very sandy entrance road running a good half mile before reaching my residence and if it hasnt rained in awhile, the engine will get a thick film of brown residue of sand/dirt/grime all over it which will naturally end up on the various linkages, pivit points , throttle body, cables, etc...that require periodic lubrication . SO, I was wondering how using a low pressure residential hose with detergent for cleaning and flushing might possibly run down the ignition wires into the spark plug housings ,for instance ?

It has been around about 110 years:
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gasoline_direct_injection
It is only "new" because of the marketing of the car makers. Just like with Microsoft came out with their first 32-bit OS and touted it as though it was a world's first when 32-bit OSes had been around for a LONG time before that.
Very, very few things are completely new, particularly in the automotive world. Look at hybrids and such and you find they were first tried 100 years ago! The main difference is we now have better technology so these architectures are somewhat more viable, but still not all that viable in reality. Take away the government subsidies and most of these "new" technologies would die on the vine just as they first did 100 or so years ago.
Matt
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wrote:

This also means no fuel will pass the intake valves. Due to crankcase ventilation and exhaust gas recirculation deposits might form on the intake valves. This has been a major problem with Mitsubishi engines.
Rob
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