Attn Hyundai tech: P0442 DTC and fixing it by myself, 2002 Sonata GLS

HT,
Well, after nearly 5+ months of headache and hassle, they figured it out. P0442 is the fuel pump gasket leaking. But they wanted $1400 to replace a $7 part. During all that crazy stuff they did to my car (02
Sonata GLS V6), they dropped the tank twice to figure stuff out but now they want money to fix, what I perceive, is something they likely caused when they dropped my tank one of the two times.
So this fuel pump gasket sits under the fuel pump that's accessible through the trunk and atop the tank. Does the tank *really* have to be dropped to get at it? Is it possible to unbolt the fuel pump part, shimmy out the gasket and just do it myself?
- Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That's pretty much all that's required unless one of the bolts breaks. Then it becomes not pretty in a hurry.
If they were dropping the tank to check for the leak, then I doubt they caused it. If they removed the fuel pump for some reason prior to the P0442 code existing in the first place, then it's more likely.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

it. If they removed the fuel pump for some reason prior to the P0442 code existing in the first place, then it's more likely. Thanks much for the answer. You just saved me $1400. Give me an address so I can send some free beer from Chicago. I had a feeling it was a simple replacement. The dealer made it sound like the four horsemen of the apocalypse. They also said I'd likely need a new tank and all this other stuff and it just sounded bogus to me. Would someone really design a spot where it required a $7 part but a heck of a lot of labor and hassle just to fix? Ok, engines aside, LOL.
And just to be sure, in this diagram (
http://www.jimellishyundaiparts.com/images/parts/Hyundai/fullsize/HMA380PA0231-31102.jpg ), we're talking about parts 31115 (gasket) and 31159 (the bolts). Would I need the bolts labeled 1129EC too? Just wanted to ask so as to cover all my bases. I also couldn't just fix it by using some of that gasket stuff that comes in a tube and sets up in a few hours to just plug the current leak?
The dealer *did* say that they were worried about the bolts because they looked rusty and might break. I can swear they monkyed with something in that area before to see if something was leaking and causing that code. So if the bolt break, what's the worst that happens, I have to drill and get an extractor to get it out? Re-tap?
The dealer made mention of the fact that because it is right by the gas tank that they had to empty the tank of fuel because if they had to heat up the bolts to loosen them it might cause an explosion. It sounds legit to me but is that the way to get out these stubborn bolts if you suspect they'd break? Would it be wise to get replacement OEM bolts if I were to take on this job myself so that if I did get the old ones out fine I'd have nice new bolts to put back in? Would using one of those penetrating lubricants that gets in the threads help at all or would that possibly leak into the tank and spoil the fuel? Do it during warm weather to allow for natural expansion?
- Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, March 28, 2013 11:25:15 AM UTC-4, Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP] wrot e:

Yes, the 31115 gasket and the 31159 screws (I think six of them). I doubt you'll need the 1129EC.

Don't do this. It's reasonably likely to cause more problems than solution s. Use the factory gasket.

affected the gasket. If the bolt breaks, it'll be very difficult to remov e it and salvage the flange without damaging the tank. That's what may cau se you to need a new tank. You can try to drill them without damaging the tank (very difficult), but I believe they're too small for you to be able t o use an extractor on.

I think this part is BS. Even empty of fuel, a fuel tank is full of fuel v apors. No heat. Ever. Period. The pump retaining bolt-- screws is a bet ter term-- are small. You typically wouldn't heat them.

tly affect the fuel even if you get them in the tank. It can't hurt to get new bolts. The factory bolts should be nicely plated and the exact length necessary. Trying to get the exact right size at the hardware store befor ehand will likely be very difficult.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.