Best price I could find.

http://www.partsgeek.com/ppvtdmc-hyundai-sonata-window-regulator.html?utm_source=shopzilla&utm_medium=pf&utm_content &utm_campaign=PartsGeek+ShopZilla&fp=pp&utm_term=Hyundai+Window+Regulator
Part no. #740-101 My search: 2000 Hyundai Sonata Power window regulator without motor.
I tried looking on J.C. Whitney, but it just kept going around in circles. What do we expect from J.C. Whitney? Like the magic wheel balancing rings. "A famous scientist writes..."
Whaddaya think?
Richard PS: I feel that I know enough now to start taking the trim off the door.
Richard
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On 5/30/2014 11:46 AM, Richard Steinfeld wrote:

Power window regulators for this car can be easily found on eBay. Cost should be around $40.
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On Friday, May 30, 2014 5:46:08 PM UTC-4, Richard Steinfeld wrote:

_source=shopzilla&utm_medium=pf&utm_content&utm_campaign=PartsGe ek+ShopZilla&fp=pp&utm_term=Hyundai+Window+Regulator

I put a Dorman distributor gear on my 1992 Taurus. It wasn't nearly as har d as the original, and it lasted about 3500 miles. There was some other is sue with the engine (which wasn't worth investigating) causing the distribu tor gear failure, but a used distributor I installed lasted more than twice that long. So I have some question about the parts quality, even if the p rice is right. Of course, I don't know how much longer you're planning on keeping the car, so lesser parts quality may not be a big factor. It's wor th noting that two Dorman regulators cost less than one O.E., at $80 on the bottom of the page.
I have also been less than impressed with A1-Cardone, one of the other regu lators shown at the bottom of the page. I don't know anything about Replac ement or Action Crash, but I do believe VDO makes OE parts for several auto manufacturers.
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HT wrote,

I have a confession: My post was intended for a friend; I mistakenly sent it to alt.autos.hyundai! I attempted to delete it from the backbone, as this could be done in the past, but may have only deleted it from my own computer instead.
I'm interested in learning about industry practices, and sometimes experiment with myself. When I needed a replacement mirror, I obtained an aftermarket one, and was pleasantly surprised with the quality. This part has differences, but looks and feels every bit as good (and bad) as the original. There was nothing, however, to correct the stupid inhuman styling of the mirror, which is so undersized and contoured that it's hard to see much of anything, especially the curb when I'm trying to park the car. A mirror like this should be illegal.
A few years ago, I was taken in back of a local store in a major auto parts/supply chain. The manager showed me his four different brands of brake parts and explained that the merchandise is exactly the same: what the customer gets at different prices is different warranties.
I'm a good mechanic, and did this work mostly with stereo and some industrial electronic equipment. When you fix things for a living, you have the opportunity to evaluate how things fail and why. If you work on different brands, you can compare quality, engineering sensibilities, etc. It's complicated. I've also worked in engineering environments, which really gave me reasons to scratch my head.
My feeling about the design of these window winding assemblies ("regulators") is that they're stupid: they're parts that are engineered to be inadequate for their job. I suspect that the motivation for this engineering was primarily to save weight, but also to save money. Hyundai is not the only company to use this design: it's used in other cars, including my friend's GM.
Back tension must be maintained on the cable at all times. Otherwise, the cable will skip off a guide, which kinks the cable instantly, and it's trashed: the entire assembly must be replaced as a unit. The assembly is "lubricated" with what looks like a special, innovative, silicon-based retardant paste. The purpose of this thick gloop is to resist the force of the motor, ensuring that there's no slack in the cable. So, when winding, the motor has to overcome this resistance in addition to raising the window and the friction of the glass against weatherstripping and dirt, etc. The motor is pretty strong.
I hit a badly-marked speed bump and the car crashed down on that "hill." All it took was that quick jerk. The next time that I lowered the window, I heard the rhythmic ticking caused by either a broken drum flange or a kink. Then the thing failed completely with the window stuck open.
Looking on the web, it's easy to see that this design has generated a lot of customer complaints. I've already done this repair on the left side and was underwhelmed with the original part, as well as its engineering.
So, I figured that an aftermarket part probably would not be worse. Of course, it could be. It's too late to change the order (thanks for the warning, HT!). I noticed that the aftermarket has matured a lot since I began seeing imitation import parts during the 70s. I see three or four different brand names of importers/distributors. Someone gave this replacement part a good rating (hell: that someone may have been the vendor!).
It's expensive for a car maker to maintain a parts inventory. Many dealers must pay inventory tax, which is an incentive to keep stocks low and depend on special ordering. I wonder when a time will come when car makers and their dealers will depend upon being supplied, themselves, from the aftermarket parts distributors without running an in-house parts operation at all. Or farming out their own replacements to a contractor. In consumer electronics, this trend had already begun during the 1980s.
When working on sound equipment, I formed a philosophy about two categories of repairs. There were honest failures and there were stupid failures. An honest failure is when a belt wears out. An example of a stupid failure was a Sony turntable that came in with collapsed platter bearings. The product failed because the engineer designed the assembly upside-down. I "fixed" it by rotating the same parts 180 degrees. BIC record changers locked up because an engineer specified the wrong grease, and the company continued to use it for at least six years. The grease maker had issued a warning against using the product with these materials. Bad designs often go out into the world because the managers are in a hurry to get the designers onto the next product.
HT, I'm interested in hearing your comments! Anyone else, too.
Richard
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