Corolla v Civic v Hyundai/Nissan moeds

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My Chrysler 4 sp automatic, which came out in the early 90s, has lockup on the top 3 gears. In effect it has 7 gears. The fuel mileage is excellent.
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Elle wrote:

Just a short anecdote here...
I'm not sure what manufacturer introduced "lock up converters," but Studebaker began using its self designed automatic featuring a lock up converter for the 1950 model year.
My 1955 President, a hefty 4,200 lb sedan with 259 V8/DG-250 tranny achieved 21/28 mpg in real time road tests in that era. Not bad for a 4 bbl carb, auto and pretty good performance. My uncle used to really rub it in to Chevy/Ford owners...
In a lot of ways, we really haven't advanced much farther.
JT
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Did you have a CAT on that Stude and run ethanol tainted gas?
wrote

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Elle wrote

Bravo. I read Wikipedia a few hours ago and I believe it confirms Studebaker was first c. 1949.

They did MPG tests back then? What is the history of fuel economy becoming important to car manufacturers?
Elle Who pumped gasoline as a summer job when it was 59 cents a gallon.
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Elle wrote:

There were a few small models with small engines that were designed to be thrifty for just about as long as cars were built. It would be hard to answer your question definitively, because it would depend on how you defined it. Volkswagen used to boast about the 25 MPG Beetle (although the heavier, faster, more robust Volvo Amazon would also average 25). Models like the Nash Rambler (introduced in 1950) and Plymouth Valiant were designed with fuel economy as a significant factor. I'm sure that whenever there was a Depression or Recession, or gas rationing, fuel economy was used as a selling point...
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Thanks for the report. :-)

Ha!
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CVTs.
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Newbie wrote:

Also, the Prius isn't heavily discounted off of MSRP, while the Corolla is. There was brief period, after California gave out the maximum number of carpool lane stickers for hybrids, that Prius street prices fell a lot, but now with the higher gas prices they're back up.
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A good analysis, but real world consumption figures show the Prius lower than the EPA rating, much lower in cold winter weather. On the up side for the Prius here in Canada there are Gov. rebates for low consumption vehicles, which drop the price of the Prius significantly, the Camry hybrid quite a bit and even the Corolla slightly.
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wrote:

My real world consumption figures for my Prius in NJ is a reliable 50+ MPG in the winter and 52-55 nowadays. Blocking the front grille slats in the winter keeping the engine warmer goes a long way. So my real world consumption figures for my Prius in NJ is higher than the EPA rating. Tomes
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wrote:

The cabbies here tell me they get: -9 l/100 (26 mpUSg) with the Corolla and -6 l/100 (39 mpUSg) with the Prius. This is all urban driving.
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Got a lot of opinions Josh, how about facts, the Prius will NOT run on a failed battery pack and cabbies have heavy feet, it is part of the job.....however, don't you see the contradiction in your two statements that the battery packs fail in three to five years yet they are usesd as high mileage taxies....of course you don't see that, after all, you have been told all of these things and after all drove a prius once admittedly overloaded. Oh well, this is the internet, these are things you have heard or read so of course they must be true fact.

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Ok, I'm biased since I own 3 Corollas (one tho is a 1992 but in great shape). I won't get into which one is the best because of my bias but how can you go wrong with any of your choices? Even if you did, how bad could it be compared to your other choices? I say rather than beat your brains out, buy the Corolla (is my bias showing yet?) and enjoy it for 200,000 miles or more.
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As others have pointed out, the Prius is larger than a Corolla so the comparison isn't completely fair. OTOH, a Civic Hybrid costs about $3000 more than a Civic EX and the 40 to 30 mpg comparison would be about right fro these two. So it could pay for itself and then some during the period you expect to own it.
As for your original questions:
Civic LX or EX model is worth considering. LX saves you about $2000 if you don't need a sunroof, alloy wheels or a fancy stereo.
Use Edwards and the manufacturer sites to do your research. Google is your friend.
I would shop any place that sells the cars. You can play them against each other to see who will give you the best price.
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It's also fair to point out that there are Federal tax breaks available to those that buy hybrids. If those tax breaks are still in existence (and I believe they are), they greatly enhance the economy of these vehicles.

And by all means, use the fleet manager and the web site of the dealership. You can usually get better deals this way than by dealing with the snake on the sales floor...
--
Joe - Linux User #449481/Ubuntu User #19733
joe at hits - buffalo dot com
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"Joe" ...

If one is stuck paying the AMT (alternative minimum tax), there is no break for them. Tomes
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If one is "stuck" paying the AMT, the price shouldn't be that big of a deal to them... ;-)
--
Joe - Linux User #449481/Ubuntu User #19733
joe at hits - buffalo dot com
  Click to see the full signature.
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wrote:

more folks need to know that then know it today. Tomes
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My understanding of the tax incentive is that it is limited to the first 60,000 cars of each model, or maybe the auto maker. The Prius has gone over that so there is no more incentive.
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Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

It's fine, as long as you sell it before the batteries need to be replaced. Toyota is very clever with the Prius batteries in the way they never discharge them very deeply, at least in the U.S. (in other countries there is a button that allow greater electric range by allowing the batteries to discharger more). This allows them to claim that they last a very long time, when in fact they are losing efficiency from day one. _They_ get to decide when the batteries are worn out. It's similar to how automakers define "normal" oil consumption to avoid having to repair oil-burning engines.
You're much better off with a Corolla than a Prius, unless you're driving huge amounts of miles (then you're better off with one of the VW TDI vehicles). I recently sold something on craigslist to someone that drove up in a new TDI. Since they don't sell these in California, I asked him how he got it, and he said that there's a dealer in Marin county that brings in slightly used TDIs from Oregon (I think they need 7000 miles on them) then sells them as used cars. Very high mileage and very good engines. VWs have good longevity, even if they have more initial problems.
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