Door locked by itself - 2007 Sonata

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good idea when at gas stations or any where to get into the habit of taking the keys with you.Just in case some clown jumps in while you are paying for the gas Groceries etc etc and takes off on a joy ride .To me is a good bit of security that the car locks itself when keys removed yours seem exceptionally touchy though
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I leave the car running while pumping gas and it has not locked on me. In the case of hte OP, it would be good practice to either remove the key or lower a window until some conclusive cause is found.
As for going inside to pay, thee is a bit of security if you have the proper type of remote starter installed. With mine, I can hit the button on the fob and then remove the key and leave the engine (and AC or heat) running while you do into the store. You can lock hte doors if you want, but putting your foot on the brake without hte key in the "on" position kills everything.
I really like the remote starter when temperatures are extreme in either direction.
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wrote:

the engine running, either on the highway or a public place?
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Depends on where you live.
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Don't know, don't care. Probably is in some places.
The news recently had a story about cars being stolen while people warmed them up while they finished their coffee in the morning. With a remote, it is still secure. Hit the button and the doors lock, engine starts and runs, but stops as soon as you hit the brake unless the key is in the on position.
Common sense dictates you don't start a car in the garage. The button has to be held for about 4 seconds so a bump won't start it accidentally. It will shut down at a pre-determined time also so that it cannot be left running all day. Mine will go 10 minutes. When I park the car at night, I also put the heated seat button in the on position.
This is my second winter with it. I won't have a car without it.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



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Untill your fuel stocks run out over and the past catches up with you:0

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Sir , it is in so in some parts within the Commonwealth of Australia. On this key thing -you folk must have pointed the bone at me. Happened last night when I got in the car !!
The chain of events went like this
1 unlocked the car with the key rather than the remote . 2 Alarm triggered 3 used remote to stop alarm 4 Entered car as normal started car as reversing the doos locked by themselves ? That has never happened before ( unless I set the auto lock thing via the arm rest )
This may help hyundai tech track down teh cause. could it be a sequence within teh chip that controls this function ? HTH
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Ed that is illegal in OZ There lays the problem of posting to groups that are multi national. Illegal to leave keys in ignition at any time when the vehicle is unattended ( $200 fine in this state) Filling a vehicle with engine running and the fine is as per "What are the penalties for non-compliance? Answer: Maximum penalties provided on conviction for breaches of the Explosives and Dangerous Goods (Dangerous Goods Handling and Storage) Regulations 1992 are $50 000 or if the breach is a continuing one, $5 000 per day. These penalties apply to everybody including the licensee, console operator, mechanic and even the customers."
But wait there is more another fine is just about to come into force This one is a Federal ping under urban pollution controls act Up to One mIllion dollars (although I think it is aimed more at large particle emitters than the normal fuel station customer) It gets worse now there are various toll free lines to Govt Depts and purpose is to Dobb in observed offenders
So we here for all sorts of reasons take our keys -mainly though to deter the scum bags who delight in hopping in vehicles and buzzing off. More than not the vehicle is nearly always found wrapped around a tree or pole or bunt out :(
We have had far too many instances where the scum have taken off with babies in the back and in a couple of tragic instances all died when the noddy lost control and crashed ------- Different eh :0
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wrote:

In Calfornia and I believe a number of other states it is illegal to leave the car running while refueling.
Old_Timer

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<Old_Timer> wrote in message wrote in message

Ditto Michigan. In fact I think it's illegal to leave a car running unattended anywhere. The law caused quite a flap when remote starters became popular 'cuz technically it was illegal to remotely start your car in your own driveway! Not sure of the current law now that I'm living in warm Arizona.
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On Tue, 29 Jan 2008 19:10:50 -0700, "DonC"

headlights to be one in bad weather, i.e weather that is bad enough to have the windshield wipers on. Still many drivers that don't have their lights on under these conditions. Apart from it being the law, it is also commonsense to be seen by other drivers.
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It's only a good idea if that's what you think is going to happen. Many of us don't live in areas where that is terribly likely, and many of us fill up at pumps where we simply put our card in, pump the gas and get back in the car. There are even some of us that can remember to take our keys out in areas where it is more advisable to do so.
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On Tue, 29 Jan 2008 18:26:48 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

Like this old guy who offered to buy us a cup of coffee if we gave him a lift to san Francisco, 200 miles away!
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The locks on the 2007 Sonata shouldn't lock unless such an input is received (or, if programmed, the vehicle reaches a preset speed).
This will be a difficult problem to find, given the intermittent nature. This doesn't of course mean you shouldn't take it to be looked at, but unless the dealer can reproduce the condition, the'll pretty much be limited to anything Hyundai can tell them about similar problems nationwide. It's possible they may pull the interior door panels to investigate for pinched wires and such, but I'd doubt they'd get into too much disassembly unless they had significant reason to believe they were going to find something.
Comparing the 2007 to a 2003 will yield little of any value. There's virtually nothing that's the same on either car. Also consider that it's unlikely all of any particular car's design features will be exactly as you'd prefer. The best you can hope for is to have the manufacutrer act because you've made your opinion known to them. And believe me, they do listen to these things.
Also, once the door is shut, the locks will again lock with the key in the ignition. At this point, the car assumes you're inside. For now, the best advice I can offer is to not leave the keys in the car. Furthermore, if the vehicle believes the key to be in the ignition, the remote won't work, so taking the remote with you isn't likely to be the solution, either.
I agree there's something wrong with the car, and that you have a right to have it fixed. Unfortunately, finding the fix is likely to be costly to you in terms of time and inconvenience.
-- Message posted using http://www.talkaboutautos.com/group/alt.autos.hyundai / More information at http://www.talkaboutautos.com/faq.html
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Our 2007 Sonata does the same thing with the key pulled partially out of the ignition. We do this when we put it in the garage so we don't have to search where the other one put the keys. I never took it to the dealer because of the intermittent nature, as HT suggested. Maybe there will eventually be a TSB on it.

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wrote:
I have a 2007 Santa Fe,and I had something similar happen two days ago. Myseft ,The Wife and the teenager went to the local mall for a quick bank and milk run.i parked the SF and left the engine running and then left the vehicle ,soon to be followed by the wife.
i got back from getting milk and she the bank and as i sat down she states "nice" i say,whats nice...she says "locking me in" i said i did no such thing...she says that every time she tried to unlock the car to get out that it locked again.they both thought i was in the store watching out the window and using the key fob to lock the door when she tried to get out.
I said that i did not do this and was not pranking them which was not believed until i pointed out my keys were in the ignition with the fob attached.
it hasnt happened again...could not duplicate it either...going to be a head scratcher trying to figure this one out.

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Just a thought, could it be the bank? I wonder if the receiver gets a signal from some other source on a nearby frequency and it triggers the door locks.
A supermarket in town sits high on a hill where you'd expect great radio reception. Driving near the end where the bank is, you get lots of interference, even at times the bank is open.
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Ed you may be on to something . I tried to replicate your problem HEAPS no go. I rang the folks who service our Sonatas he said he HAS heard of it ONCE but they could find nothing .
Solution mark IV C -buy a long key chain and clip onto the keys :) Then when one get used to taking keys with you (as one should) put a watch or dog on the chain:)
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wrote in message

Banks usually have lots of computerized "stuff" - ATMs. computers, cash counting equipment, etc. This can interfere with radio reception. The fobs used with most modern vehicles - the Hyundais for sure - utilize a series of encrypted data bursts. Basically, the data is based on an encryption key that is shared between the receiver in the vehicle, and the fob. This is typically called "rolling code". The shared key gets determined when the fob is paired with the vehicle. There is NO WAY the receiver will mistake anything else for an authentic transmission.
If you're interested.... http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/AppNotes/91002a.pdf Hyundai uses Omron http://www.omronauto.com/rftechnology.php but they don't explain anything, and the principal is the same.
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One word. Titanic
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