Dreaded check engine light

The check engine light on my 2001 Accent just started to stay on solid but there is no apparent problem with the car. My dealer suggested that it is safe to drive until I can book an appointment. Strange
thing is the check engine light went off after a gas fillup but came back on after a few short trips.
The only means that I have to get the code is to pay the dealer $40. Will replacing the gas cap help?
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Auto Zone (if there's one near you) will read the code for free. I believe there have been references here to other places that will provide the same service.
There are many items which will cause your check engine lamp to illuminate. Replacing the fuel cap has very low odds of fixing the issue.
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On Tue, 14 Jun 2005 17:54:26 -0400, "hyundaitech"

Looks like I will have to book an appointment. I feel that the $40 charge to read the code just adds insult to injury.
Thank you for the quick response.
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wrote:

Perhaps you could purchase one? Any codes relating to emissions systems are standardized, so a <$100 reader would tell you what's up (if it's emissions related). $40 at the dealer is cheaper this time, but if it happens again you're close to breaking even. Plus you can loan (rent?) it to friends. Personally, I live close enough to an autozone.
Good luck. Ben
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Richard Dreyfuss wrote:

Let me chip in with two points: 1. In my area (northern California), all Autozone stores don't read customers' codes. I'm not sure that any will, and the one near me definitely does not -- and the staff haven't heard of this policy.
2. Absolutely carry a code reader in the car (my advice). The Innova/Equus reader is still on sale (not printed in the flyer now) for $100 after the rebate at Kragen/Shucks/whatever. I also tried the AutoXray product for $250 and user-hostile menu logic drove me crazy, plus it seemed that half the menu options were disabled and said "send money for an upgrade." The Innova reader is very easy to use. It is not a profesional scan tool; for example, it won't show "freeze frame data."
One proviso: the early Innova readers were provided with a plug that's al ultra-tight fit to my Sonata; so tight that I think it'll be possible to destroy the car's connector with it. Innova is sending me a revised replacement cable.
The Innova comes with an excellent manual and a list of generic OBDII codes. It's almost worth the money for the reader just for the explanation in the book about the OBDII system and its history. In addition to the codes in the book, you can download the Hyundai-specific codes off the Hyundai web site, print it, and carry it along with the code reader.
What do you think about that?
(Note that there's an additional diagnostic system named "CAN" that's arriving about now with some of the latest cars. Most of the readers on the market won't read CAN codes and cannot be upgraded to do so. For this reason, I decided to rein in my reader expense at this hundred bucks.
Richard
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Last time I checked, Auto Zone is not allowed to do this anymore. This is true only for California. I found out about this about 2 years ago. The state figured it was best that car owners don't know that their cars have emmssions controls problems since owners would only avoid the expense of fixing it until time of smogging for registration renewal. If said cars were seen by mechanics, chances are better that the problem would be fixed.
Get it? Conflict of interest...
<<<<Auto Zone (if there's one near you) will read the code for free. I believe there have been references here to other places that will provide the same service.
There are many items which will cause your check engine lamp to illuminate. Replacing the fuel cap has very low odds of fixing the issue. >>>>
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This might seem obvious but are you sure you turned the cap till it clicked a few tiems? If not the ECM will read a fault in the emission system. I believe if you drive it for a few trips, after retightening the cap, the light will go off if the cause is a loose cap.

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On Thu, 16 Jun 2005 00:04:20 -0700, "No Spam for me"

Yes I am sure that I turned the fuel cap as you have described. The service manager did the same. On two occasions, the CE light stayed off but came back on after a few trips for no apparent reason.
The O ring on the cap seems to be in good condition.
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