DriveAxle/CV replacement Santa Fe 2003

I've replaced drive axles/CVs on a number of cars over the years but in looking at the instructions for a 2003 Santa F2, 2.7 V6, automatic 2WD, not ABS, there are about 2 things that are strange... like some advice
about: 1) Step 4 says "Drain the transaxle oil", but then it never says to refill it. Do I really have to drain it? Other cars I didn't have to do this. 2) Step 9 says to "Drive off the driveshaft from the transaxle or transfer inner shaft using a hammer and brass bar" and it shows some sort of obscure sketch that doesn't make sense. Do you use the tip to push out on the axle so that the bottom of the pry bar moves towards the center of the car or is it the other way?
3) At the end, it says to put the circlip down when installing the driveshaft/CVs but it doesn't say to click it in place. I assume I should. If so, I have always worried that I'd hurt the bearings in the CV joints, so what are you supposed to hold onto when you drive it in... or are you supposed to just barely engage the splines and then push as fast as possible so that you don't actually jam the axle shorter but instead it has momentum to click into place?
4) I don't really have to detach the hub from the ball joint, do I? Can it just swing out of the way?
While I am in there are there any bushings that often wear out after 160k miles and almost a decade of aging that should be replaced?
Thanks! KW
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On Sunday, December 9, 2012 9:43:15 AM UTC-5, KWW wrote:

You may lose some of the transfer case oil or transmission fluid, but you shouldn't need to drain. It should only be a small amount of fluid. Just make sure to top off upon completion.

You're basically moving the inner joint toward the outside of the car. I typically do this with a pry bar if I'm removing from the transmission or the hammer and bar method if I'm removing from the transfer case.

The axle is made to compress and expand. Unless you exert a severe amount of pressure, you won't do any damage. It does help if you orient the clip as described. Once you get the axle started, you'll need to hold the inner joint at the proper angle and push inward. It'll take a good shove (and may take a brass or plastic hammer) to provide enough force to get it to engage.

No, as long as you take everything else loose (strut, tie rod end). In fact, the ball joint is typically the hardest thing to separate, so you're usually better off leaving it attached. Be sure to allow enough slack in the brake line (or remove the caliper) and wheel speed sensor wiring that you don't unduly stretch them.

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Thank you VERY VERY much! I sincerely appreciate it. KWW On 12/10/2012 11:50 AM, hyundaitech wrote:

shouldn't need to drain. It should only be a small amount of fluid. Just make sure to top off upon completion.

typically do this with a pry bar if I'm removing from the transmission or the hammer and bar method if I'm removing from the transfer case.

pressure, you won't do any damage. It does help if you orient the clip as described. Once you get the axle started, you'll need to hold the inner joint at the proper angle and push inward. It'll take a good shove (and may take a brass or plastic hammer) to provide enough force to get it to engage.

the ball joint is typically the hardest thing to separate, so you're usually better off leaving it attached. Be sure to allow enough slack in the brake line (or remove the caliper) and wheel speed sensor wiring that you don't unduly stretch them.

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