Gasoline instrument!

Hello everybody!
I have a small problem with my instrument table in my Hyundai Lantra 1.8GLS. When I turn off a car, so when no electricity is supply to the instrument
table, I recently discovered, that the gasoline needle won't go down. So, if I am clear: all needles (speedo- and RPM, temperature) are positioned to the minimum (to number 0), except the needle for gasoline information shows the ammount of gas. It means, if the car has been fully filled up with gas, the needle shows maximum all over again also when the car is not working (and the key is pulled out).
What should be the problem?
Thanks for all answers, Regards, Bojan.
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If it reads correctly when the key is on you do not have a problem.
FWIW - the one in my 2006 goes to zero. OTOH, I have seen designs that do not or do so very slowly. The reason is that a fast responding needle would bounce around as the fuel sloshes in the tank so the gauge is set up to respond slowly to changes. This averages out the sloshing.

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Thanks for the answer. But maybe I wasn't clear enough. The needle actually doesn't fall slow, it shows the right ammount of gasoline. It just doesn't go down to zero (0) not even through a night, when a car doesn't work. And clearly the electric current is flowing through the instriment table. When I disconnect battery, the needle falls down. Any suggestion or is this situation OK? I think, something isn't right whit the electricity?
Regards, Bojan.
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wrote:

Most mechanical meters use a spring to return the needle to zero when there is no power applied. If that spring breaks the needle usually goes to the maximum reading and stays there when power is on.
There is at least one design that uses an electric coil instead of a spring. Many car manufacturers use this type for gas tanks as it leaves the needle reading how much fuel is in the tank when the engine is shut off. It is a feature. I don't know if Hyundai used this type on your car but it sounds like it.
My bottom line would be that if it reads "right" when the power is on I would not worry about it. It is handy to be able to read the fuel level without having to turn on the key.
nothermark
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