HT (and everyone) : Whats your experience using warm engine heat (for intake) in the winter with regard to better fuel economy ?

Has anyone tried seeing if their fuel economy improves by letting warm engine heat enter the Intake instead of cold outside air ?
Theoretically, shouldn't warm air in the winter time fool the MAF sensor / Computer into thinking its hot outside and thus lean the mixture out more for better fuel economy ? Thoughts ? Thanks.

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I was always taught that cool/cold air is denser than warm/hot air, thus higher compression/power/MPG.
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Has anyone tried seeing if their fuel economy improves by letting warm engine heat enter the Intake instead of cold outside air ?
Theoretically, shouldn't warm air in the winter time fool the MAF sensor / Computer into thinking its hot outside and thus lean the mixture out more for better fuel economy ? Thoughts ? Thanks.
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On Sun, 20 Jul 2014 11:48:51 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Theoretically, you need a given amount of fuel to do a given amount of work. Unless the engine was too rich to begin with (as could happen with some older carbureted engines) it won't make any difference. The computer will optimize the fuel/air ratio for best combustion.
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On Sunday, July 20, 2014 1:48:51 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Would like H.T.'s take on this too.
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On Monday, July 21, 2014 2:08:50 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

re for better fuel economy ? Thoughts ? Thanks.

I'd surmise that the combustion chamber temperature is the overriding facto r. If the combustion chamber temperature is too cold, the engine will need to run a little rich. Otherwise, fuel mixture is controlled by exhaust ga s composition and the oxygen sensors. Once the combustion chamber is up to temperature, small differences in intake air temperature aren't likely to be terribly meaningful.
I also suspect manufacturers have experimented with such things. The gover nment is continually pushing for more fuel-efficient vehicles. If this wer e able to significantly increase fuel economy, it would have already been d one.
Think about it, manufacturers are doing complex things now to achieve bette r fuel economy (GDI, engine shutting off at stops, six- and eight-speed tra nsmissions, higher compression engines, etc.) Why would they spend time on all this stuff and overlook simple things?
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On Sunday, July 20, 2014 1:48:51 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Good points. Thanks HT.
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