Hyundai car making strange noise

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On Fri, 17 Jul 2009 17:24:15 -0400, "jim"


I said it wouldn't hurt. I listened to the sound file and didn't hear anything really. So my advice is to provide a better sound file or take it somebody who can figure it out. Never heard a noise that can't be located pretty quickly. For lower speed stuff running alongside the car can help pin it down quick. I like the recorder idea. Might tape it to different parts of the suspension and the louder it gets the closer you are. Or a good front end man and a rack might tell the tale real fast. But I have absolutely no idea what the noise sounds like so I can't recommend anything beyond what I said.
--Vic
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You need to turn it up and listen close at the times I mentioned. It's a fast clicking noise. I know, there's a lot of normal noise (engine running, road sound, etc.) in front of it. It's easier to hear when you're really in the car than in the recording.

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I suppose, but these hubcaps have big holes in them, so I'm not sure how something could get caught in there, move around a lot, and not come out. Furthermore, there is more reason to believe this is not a hubcap problem (and so this test would just be a waste): sometimes I've heard the sound when the car is not moving, but idling. When it happens while idling, there may be, though I'm not sure, a correlation with putting it into/out of gear, for example shifting to/from park. And it doesn't happen constantly when it's moving either, just episodically. When it occurs with the shifting it's only like I think 1, 2, maybe 3 clicks (but they sound just the same and have the same frequency.).
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And it also doesn't always happen when changing gears, either. But sometimes it's been heard it at those times.
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Could you be a dear and leave usenet for those who don't slap respondants' suggestions back in their faces? I can't tell you how much I hope the noise is hubcap creep.
Toyota MDT in MO
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Toyota MDT in MO wrote:

I'm thinking it's a sticky caliper. Just did another set of rear discs on a GM with STUCK glides.
Anyone have a better lube for them? The stuff I'm using now is a silicone based grease made for the pins but it still doesn't last that long. The current method is to clean (or replace them if pitted) the pins. use a dowel to clean out the bores (a .30 caliber gun brush works REAL well) then solvent flush and air dry. Then a generous helping of lube and install the pins. Then a light coat of sealer inside the boot to lock it to the caliper mount and to the pin. I would think that water/air wouldn't be getting in there but I still get a couple that stick.
--
Steve W.

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wrote:

I got some black stuff in little clear plastic tubes; can't remember name...too lazy to dig through my *kit* but for giggles, couldn't you just squeeze some silver-colored anti-seize into the pin guides? The same stuff we use on spark plugs. Takes the heat, just can't say how long it would stay where it should. Then in 30 days or so, see if you still have play in the calipers...maybe use a screwdriver to test, but remember the pads need to be compressed first. So have to remove wheel and tire to do that. Just an idea if you've got the time.
Nick

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Antiseize isn't a terrible thing to use on sealed slide parts, but it isn't ideal or recommended for this application. It isn't quite the lubricant that silicone/ceramic products are and it doesn't seal out, shed or adhere in moisture as well.
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On Sun, 19 Jul 2009 21:28:34 -0700 (PDT), Toyota MDT in MO

Okay, thanks for the Tip, MTD. I'll keep using that brake grease that I buy in little tubes then. I find one little tube will do two calipers/anti-squeal shims. I would hate to go to all that trouble only to find the pin slides *dry* from seepage or some such.
Nick
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I don't know the specific setup you've got there, but if it's what I think it is, then the rubber boots may be fitting too loosely (old), or the grooves the boots sit in have corrosion in them.
On my car I've found Sil-Glyde to work the best for the pins, BUT it depends on the cleanliness of the boot grooves, and the tightness of the boots in those grooves. The rubber boots do expand with age, making them fit more loosely, allowing water in.
--
Tegger


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There are a lot of good brake greases available. I'm currently using a purple colored Permatex product (brush in cap style) that may actually be relabelled Ceramlub. Its visible properties and performance seem OK but it's too early to tell at this time. If you are in NY, then you just have to suffer the consequences of nasty weather and salt (if used). I would suggest on caliper bores that aren't corroded, you don't brush them or their pins, but clean and dry with solvent/swab/whatever. There's no reason to abraid the corrosion resistant coating if it is still working. On corroded parts you have to wire brush or replace. The rubber components are usually the culprit when a pin gets corroded. If you replace them with the typical aftermarket boot kit you will probably be in for more of the same as they are often thin, distorted junk compared to OE. They barely hold up here in mostly decent weather, I can't imagine crappy boots standing a chance in the N.E.
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Toyota MDT in MO wrote:

Yep, upstate NY. Never heard of nasty weather here...;-) Salt? OH you mean "corrosion accelerator"..
I currently use Permatex Ultra silicone. Seem to work OK but I wondered if anyone had a better lube. Normally I just flush the bores with solvent and dry them. Pins get cleaned and burnished or replaced if pitted. If the seals are intact then I clean the grooves and apply a thin coat of permatex sealer to hold them secure once installed. I see the same thing with the aftermarket crap.
--
Steve W.

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If you don't mind me asking, what do you mean by (or how do you go about) burnishing the pins?
Thanks.
Toyota MDT in MO
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Toyota MDT in MO wrote:

Use a fine wire wheel to get any crud off. Then clean the groove real well. Then the pins get hooked to a mandrel (high tech - cut off bolt that will thread into them) Then I use what is basically a flat knife steel to smooth them out. Takes about 30 seconds to do each one. They are smooth then.
I've been thinking about buying a couple new caliper mounts and seeing if they can be bushed with a bronze or stainless sleeve.
--
Steve W.

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I see. That's going pretty far but I like your methodology and perseverance :-)
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Toyota MDT in MO wrote:

I HATE sticking calipers!!!!
--
Steve W.

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Why do you think I'm just dismissing it? Rather I thought about it, and I weighed it in light of available evidence.
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wrote:

*What* evidence? you didn't even try the only suggestion you've gotten. Ok, take the car in to a mechanic and have him change the entire front end. Cost you a couple of thousand, problably won't eliminate the sound, will take at least a week without the car, but at least you won't have spend 15 minutes removing the hubcaps and listening if the sound is gone.
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The "evidence" is that the sound also happens when the car is not moving but idling, as I mentioned in another post here. I'm not sure how a hubcap could cause that.

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wrote:

For the sake of MY sanity, this thread is killfiled. but before I go, lift the hood and see if you can narrow it down to a slipping alternator/acon/water pump belt.
BY BYE !!!!! <PLONK>
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