HYUNDAI ENGINES = PLANNED OBSOLESCENCE? Seem Designed To Fail Within Five Years!

I've had two Hyundai cars -- a 2004 Elantra, and a 2010 Accent.
I am convinced that both cars' engines are designed so that OIL DISPERSEMENT is not uniform throughout the valve-cylinder system.
Thus, the valves wear out relatively rapidly.
Can't prove it, but I have little doubt the manufacturer intentionally uses this ploy to spur rapid wear and failure -- to increase sales!
A Hyundai is not a Toyota.
But admission of such underhanded processes will never come from Hyundai, which is striving mightily to match Toyota's sales levels.
My Elantra's engine died last summer, less than 90,000 miles on it (was purchased new, conscientious maintenance).
Minutes after a routine oil change, the engine stopped without warning. Inspection by a mechanic revealed no oil was reaching two cylinders.
After adding another quart of oil and during a subsequent trip of about four miles, the engine again stopped, inexplicably. But this time the failure was catastrophic. Engine destroyed due to insufficient lubricant dispersal.
Cause? Overheating, apparently due to insufficient oil circulation, a mechanic friend told me. This meant that, unless I spent $3,400 for a rebuilt engine, my Elantra had zero trade-in value.
Not surprisingly, I have received NO RESPONSE to my disaster story from either Hyundai USA, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), or the Federal Trade Commission.
A review of Hyundai Elantra customer complaints at
http://townhall-talk.edmunds.com/direct/view/.f147fcf/20
reveals numerous complaints of sudden engine failures in Elantras, model years 2004 through 2007. Descriptions were identical or similar to mine.
Now, my 2010 Hyundai Accent, less than 30,000 miles, shows signs of low oil in at least one cylinder housing. I expect nothing good to come from this development.
Recommend people contemplating buying a Hyundai car do online research and speak to Hyundai owners face-to-face before committing to a Korean car.
A Hyundai is not a Toyota.
As I have found the hard and late way.
No more of these cars for me.
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Sorry to hear about your anomolies. Ive still got my 2002 Hyundai SantaFe, 2.7 litre motor, auto trans...and have had virtually no problems with the motor which has just turned 125,000 miles . It still doesnt burn/use/loose a drop of oil between changes and is getting better gas mileage than when i first bought it. I think its luck of the draw when it comes to any car but Hyundai has made a remarkable turnaround and has become a super strong Contender in the foreign car market for the U.S. The best voted North American economy car for 2012 is the Hyundai Elantra . My next car will be a Hyundai Accent with the 6 speed auto trans...2012 or up .
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Minutes after the oil change? I have to wonder if they put oil back into it.
What was the warranty on the 2004 engine? Since it is 100,000 miles now, I doubt they are trying to make then wear out faster than that, thus, your theory is bogus.
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I have a 2003 Elantra - bought it new - and they were already offering the 100k warranty on the power train. Currently I have about 134k and no engine problems.
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I missed the original post; my spam filter probably didn't like something.
Here's my take, Gruntuld:
I used to have a custom stereo business, and we did repairs. I never found any evidence of "planned obsolescence," which implies some sort of conspiracy, but I did witness a lot of cheap, stingy junk manufacturing. Most of the mass-market consumer-grade products that I got inside were simply built down to a price that was too low.
I'm driving a 2000 Sonata. I have seen no sign of intentional slipshod engineering, but I have to say that I do not appreciate the design of the power window assemblies, which is the same design that my friend's Oldsmobile has, and which failed exactly the same way. My combined drum-disk rear brake assembly is, I feel, overdesigned, and the resultant price for this combined casting is very high: twice the cost of a front disk. And as a result, the price of the rear caliper assemblies is enough to make one faint. I'm putting up with intermittent failures in the window switches-cabling: a PITA. Othewise, I've been pleased with the durability of the parts, including the engine.
Hyundai was trying to establish an excellent reputation in those years, so built-to-fail was not what they wanted to put out into the world.
I'm using engine oil thinner than Hyundai's spec, but it's top-grade oil. There's been absolutely no sign of deterioration. I'm pleased with my motor, and with the oil.
As far as a comparison with Toyota (which I've owned) is that my Hyundai is most of a Toyota. I feel that the quality is as good. Where it is not a Toyota is in the seat covers (the leather is strange), the Hyundai is a hell of a lot noisier, and the automatic transmission shifts like a nutter. These points just confirm old comments in the press about this car. The drive cycle required to reset the computer in one go is crazy and could get you killed on the road if you follow the procedure (which I did, and it worked!). I hear that there's one series of Nissan that is as insane. That's it!
My Toyotas were excellent, and I think that the Hyundai tradeoff is a worthy one. Incidentally, I've been interested in Korean products for some time. In my stereo business, I became disgusted with the throw-away consumer products from Japan, engineered to be extremely difficult to repair. The Koreans did a lot of their design work here in the USA, and I think that our designers are more considerate than the Japanese designers. I've experienced strange failures in the Korean products (such as a Samsung microwave oven that became rather disgusting due to a paint failure!). Korean products have been very interesting, and they've been more fixable.
Please watch out for bored, underpaid people working at the quick oil change places. In fact, I don't want anyone rushing through an oil change. I want adequate time for all that junk to drain out of the pan.
Good luck with your Hyundai. These are nice cars.
Richard
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On Sun, 15 Apr 2012 00:17:20 -0700, Richard Steinfeld

snip

Thinking about this again after reading your reply, the OP is off base even more than I thought. He said the engine was designed to fail so you have to buy a new car.
Why am I driving a Hyundai? Because too many things failed on my Buick and got me POd to the point I'll never drive another. That includes three of those window mechanisms you mentioned.
I drove mostly GM cars for 50 years, Buick for the last three in a row. I'd be driving a Lucerne today if my LeSabre did not turn to crap in 5 years.
The OP may call that sort of thing "planned obsolescence" but I call it being cheap. Sure, they got me to buy a new car, but they drove me to another manufacturer.
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Yeah. I know. I believe in "buying American," but there comes a point at which I don't want to sacrifice myself on the alter. (Actually, it's a philosophy of "buying [insert your own country here]"). My Ford Aerostar was a piece of junk. It had no drain plug on the torque converter (typical modern car) and no bleed valve on the engine. To bleed the air out of the cooling system, you had to tilt the entire vehicle and let it sit there while the air bubbles gurgled up. Luckily, I have a tilted driveway. But my Hyundai actually has a drain plug on the torque converter. Without one, it costs $100+ to have your transmission fluid really changed. This is cheap shit screw the customer manufacturing.
Without really knowing, I suspect that the OP jumped to a logical, but fallible, common belief. Although, at times, I do believe in conspiracies, I've never seen truth in this one. When people repair stuff for a living, they can see how what the engineers contrive actually play out in the real world. I think that engineers should have to spend a year in a repair shop before they get out of school. Same with people in business school. It's not "planned obsolescence:" manufacturers are just being cheap shmucks who understand that most consumers will buy "features" instead of true quality. I firmly believe that it's possible to make a truly excellent cheap car, and I once owned one. But who would buy it today?
And without really knowing, I suspect that the OP was the victim of a quick-lube shop. Such joints sometimes make various errors. I've used them, but I watch closely. One error is to use the one, single oil, that they buy in bulk to get the best price. So, you need 5w-whatever oil, but they put in 10w- because that's what they have in the big tank. Or don't fasten the drain plug enough. And, unless you pay for the $100 routine, you're still stuck with 2/3 of the original dirty oil in your transmission that never got drained out because there's no drain plug! Then your transmission croaks and you have to buy a new one. And that's the fault of the car maker (Ford, in my case, and I did pay $140 for my transmission oil change; no more Fords for this guy).
Richard
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I am confused about waht the problem is. Hyundai has a 10 year power train warranty don't hey? And isn't the engine part of the powertrain? Why would they intentionally build something to fail within the warranty period?
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On 4/16/2012 2:56 AM, snipped-for-privacy@nada.com wrote:

They certainly would not! In my experience, no manufacturer ever wants to shell out for a warranty repair. As stingy as their compensation is to the repair provider, they still don't want to spend a penny of it.
I suspect that the OP has been going to a ratty quick-lube shop who caused engine damage, and that he/they messed up his motor. I don't see that he's returned to discuss this further, but I'm pretty sure that my junk filters dump his posts because I dump everything that comes in from a Google source.
Richard
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On Mon, 16 Apr 2012 02:56:39 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@nada.com wrote:

I'm not sure what year the OP was driving, but it may not have been the same warranty presently given. But is was still less than 100k miles ad warranty or not, it should be in good shape. My guess it was the oil change he just had. They had to add some oil right away.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I can't believe you all haven't figured out yet that the OP was a troll.
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