Hyundai Resale value!

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<Old_Timer> wrote in message>


Sorry - I got lost in the attributes. My bad.
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OH, I'm not saying they were worn out at 50,000 miles!!! I'm just saying that we wanted to avoid any more reduction in resale value and the inevitable things that go wrong after the warrantee period expires. (Murphy lives with us) In all the cars I've had (Knock on wood), I've never had a lemon. When I traded them in, there were no major problems with any of them. It's just a habit we had gotten into of trading. Now, with a Kia and a Hyundai, our perspective has changed. Also, with me retiring the miles don't accumulate as fast and we have broken that visous tradein cycle.
Matt, sounds like you better hang deer sirens all over that Sonota!!! I also have a 2002 Honda Civic, that I use occasionally. I was saving it as a trade in for a car for my son when he wears out his Jetta (145,000 miles). At least the Honda retains its value quite well.
Tom

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I responded to this very quote from your original post...
You said - "Four years and 50,000 miles was at the end of warrantees and, since they were American cars, they were worn out by then. Sad, but true."
It was hard to read something other than what you said into what you said...
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I was too hasty in saying they were worn out. I guess I was caught up in the 'moment'. Senioritis syndrome....... I just seemed that, at 50,000 miles, you started hearing all kinds of expensive sounds that talked you into trading before the perceived sounds became a reality. Now, some of the older 1960's and 1970's cars WERE worn out by then! Reference any early model Chrysler product pre-Ioccoa.
Tom

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wrote:

If you really want to a "look back" I am old enough to recall when cars of the 1930's era frequently required ring and valve jobs at 35,000 miles. This was especially true for the early Ford V8's. Also the rear differentials were howling on many cars with 50000 miles. As for the bodies, it was not unusual for the fenders to be "flapping" when the car was 8-10 years old. There were no rust preventatives built into the cars of that era.
The durability of the engines on all cars, domestic and imported, have seen substantial improvement over the years.
Old_Timer

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Amen, Old Timer!! I think a lot of these young 'whipper snappers' have no idea what 50,000 miles on a 1950's era car really meant. Hell, even the tires were good for only 10,000 miles or so. I had to have my 54 chevy rebuilt after 40,000 miles when I bought it for $395. Had to finance it for a year. :o)
<Old_Timer> wrote in message >>>> Tom wrote:

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And a 150 mile trip was and adventure on the two lane roads compared to the turnpikes and interstates we use today. Not to mention the headlights at night and lack of street lighting, poor road signs.
My first car was a '53 Mercury Monterey. If it held fluid, it leaked. I carried oil, water/antifreeze mix, and trans fluid. Getting 3 years from a battery was excellent. Plugs were cleaned every 5k and replaced at 10k. Points lasted maybe 10k but often needed a tweak between. It did have an automatic choke that had to be cleaned a couple of times a year to function. IIRC the radio had tubes and being a technological oriented kind of guy, I added a rear seat speaker.
Just got rid of my '91 Regal with the original exhaust system still in place. Second set of plugs, only serious repair was a water pump at 80k so at that time the radiator hoses and serpentine belt were replaced. It was on battery number 3 after 15 years.
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I forgot about the points, Edwin. Yep, I was good at that one. I could change them and adjust the dwell in just a few minutes. I guess 'practice' makes perfect. That's a lost art in today's environment. Ok on your reply, Mike. :o)
Tom

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wrote:

But how many reading here do you thnik know how the points were set on a Model A Ford?
Old_Timer

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It's all right. We all do that. Ask me how I know...

the
Agreed that back in the "good old days" we often faced some major repairs at mileage levels that today go unnoticed. The average car today will go well over 100,000 with no major problems (although they may indeed present some mind-boggling nusances), and today's engines can well be expected to run 200,000 with only the most fundamental level of care. Keep the oil changed, don't overheat it, etc. If you have to pay to get things repaired though, even those mind-boggling nusances can get expensive.
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I guess those expensive repairs for minor items is what makes us older folks cry out for the simplicity of a carburated 283 Chevy with a stick shift. We would all love to be able to troubleshoot and fix our own cars again. AND my 54 Chevy with its straight six got 20 miles per gallon! Boy, haven't we come a long way?
I hate paying a garage $80 an hour to have the least senior guy in the shop stumble about trying to fix my car. My last visit to Kia to have the plugs changed and antifreeze flushed resulted in two more visits for them to fix things they screwed up getting the first job done. (unplugged sensors and cut wire)

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I bought a 3 yr old Hyundai for less than 1/2 it's original new value, from a Hyundai *dealer*. Consider yourself lucky to only lose 1/3. Mine still had a valid basic warranty when I bought it. Poor resale value equals great used car value.
Still, I wonder if Hyundais depreciate that much worse compared to other non-Japanese makes. In some ways, Toyota and Honda live in a parallel universe.
Chris
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wrote:

It can be worse than Hyundai See table
http://www.cars.com/go/advice/Story.jsp?section=buy&story=loResidual&subject st_resale&referervice&aff=boston
Old_Timer
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<Old_Timer> wrote in message > wrote:

http://www.cars.com/go/advice/Story.jsp?section=buy&story=loResidual&subject st_resale&referervice&aff=boston
Interesting list, both the worst and the best. I did not expect to see Chevy and Ford trucks on the worst, I would have though Lexus would have made the top 1- best list.
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