new guy with a code question

Hi. This Hyundai forum seems to have a lot more traffic than the others I visited. I just bought a used 2000 Hyundai Elantra 2.0 sedan with 79,000 miles.
The check engine light is on and the codes that came up on the computer are P1624, which is some kind of anti theft system thing, and P0713. The 7013 is: transmission fluid temperature sensor high input. My questions are, what can be done to fix this? Is it a DIY type of thing? Was there a recall or service bulletin on this problem? Before buying the car, I called a local Hyundai dealer and he said the 100,000 mile warranty is not transferrable to anyone but the original owner, so I guess I'm S.O.L. if I want it fixed for free. Thanks in advance! I think I'll probably become a regular visitor on this site.
Pecos
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pecos

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I don't recall any special bulletins about this, but I've seen two basic problems.
1. The wires to the temp sensor are broken or the temp sensor is disconnected. The connector is at the very left front of the vehicle. If you remove the left front splash shield, you'll get a good view of this little two-pin connector. If the wires are broken, you'll probably need to replace the terminal in the connector. That'll be difficult to do unless you have the special tooling required to take apart the connector and a selection of terminals from which to select the proper one.
2. There's an actual open circuit in the connector itself. In this case, you'll need to replace the fluid temperature sensor, which is inside the pan clipped to the valve body. You'll need a pick or similar implement to remove the retaining clip and pull the sensor end of the connector inside the transmission. Most diy-ers would be able to do this.
I'd recommend looking at the connector/wiring (and playing with it a little right at the connector) to make sure it's not broken. If the wiring and connector are okay and you'd be comfortable doing your own fluid and filter service on your transmission, go to the dealer, get a filter and gasket kit, 5 quarts of fluid, and a new sensor. That way, you'll probably be all repaired *and* have a new filter inside the transmission.
Also, you may want to register for an account at www.hmaservice.com. It requires IE, but it's free, and you'll be able to see the shop manuals and illustrations as well as wiring diagrams and technical service bulletins.
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pecos wrote:

visited. I just bought a used 2000 Hyundai Elantra 2.0 sedan with 79,000 miles. The check engine light is on and the codes that came up on the computer are P1624, which is some kind of anti theft system thing, and P0713. The 7013 is: transmission fluid temperature sensor high input. My questions are, what can be done to fix this? Is it a DIY type of thing? Was there a recall or service bulletin on this problem?

mile warranty is not transferrable to anyone but the original owner, so I guess I'm S.O.L. if I want it fixed for free. Thanks in advance! I think I'll probably become a regular visitor on this site.

The 00's warranty is transferable.
Its only the (2003?) and higher that aren't transferable.
My 2001's is still transferable - its part of the original warranty contract which Hyundai can't just change at a whim.
JS
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The new vehicle powertrain warranty is for the original owner (2004 and newer) or immediate family members (1999-2003) only. It won't transfer to anyone else.
If the previous owner had an extended warranty, that may transfer for a fee.
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