Puff of smoke when starting.

Probably relates to all cars. Son,s Lantra (236,000 km) burns a bit of oil when starting but apparently none when running. On a trip of 1500 km there was no discernable change in oil level. Valve stem oil
seals???. If so might just put in a thicker oil. Many thanks John
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On 10/6/2011 10:03 PM, John wrote:

That's what my guess would be. I asked my mechanic what it would cost to replace the seals on my 99 Camry and he told me to just live with it. I guess I can do that. My old Rabbit had that problem - you'd think they would have come up with non-leaking seals by now.
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236,000 k equals 146,000 miles At a cruising speed of 2000 rpm at 60 mph, how many times has the valve shaft moved up and down in the seal? I'd say they last a long time. 292,000,000 strokes, give or take.
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On 10/7/2011 2:34 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

That's about what my Camry has got. What can I say? I'm gonna live with it but you want me to be happy about it too? OK, one happy face coming up! :-)
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I can remember my Dad saying ( early sixties) you should decoke your heads every 20,000 miles and if engine lasted 60,000 miles it was a wonder!.
wrote

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On 10/7/2011 8:01 PM, John wrote:

I think I might have heard something like that. If I recall correctly, you slowly run solvent through the engine. The plugs have to be replaced or blasted with abrasive to clean them. Sounds like a heap of fun!
I think the Italians would just run their engines at wide open throttle to clean the crap out their heads. This sound easier but dangerous.

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On Fri, 07 Oct 2011 21:56:20 -1000, dsi1 wrote:

A safer method in the olden days was to use water, you set the throttle to speed up the revs to about 2000 rpm, then using a teaspoon drip water into the carburettor until then engine nearly stalls, ease off until the revs recover, then add some more drops of water. This process causes small detonations in the cylinders from the steam, which loosens the carbonised deposits, some pitting can occur on the piston heads if overdone.
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Yes, i actually watched this being done by a mechanic. He used ice cold water down the carb. venturis and the white smoke that came from the exhaust was spectacular to see ! I use half a can of $8 Seafoam down my carb instead of water ... slowly putting it down the venturies, carb bowl vents, and the air bleed screws --- noticable difference after i do it . For the SantaFe, I put it in thru the PVC tube for a minute then make the engine stall ... wait 5 min., then restart and rev. I also use it in the crankcase before draining the oil . Its a very good petroleum based cleaning product. Id be VERY interested to find out the exact brew so i could make it up myself -- its is mostly isopropyl alchohol by the smell of it.
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My first car was a '53 Mercury. Typical of the cars of the day, you cleaned the plugs at 5000 miles and replaced them, along with points and rotor at 10000. Oil changes and grease job every 2000, tires at 10,000 if you were lucky. Rings and bearings at about 50,000. Batteries lasted 2 to 3 years.
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