question fer hyundaitech...

Is it normal for a V6 2.7 litre at 24,000 k to need to have both the oil pan gasket and transmission gasket replaced cause they are leaking already?? I
can see maybe one, but both??? even one at that kinda milage is kinda strange.... thats whats happening on my 2006 Santa Fe... love the attitude of the dealer though.. when you show yer concern, about it, well its under warranty..so what ya worried about.. also whats your thoughts about runnin 5 - 30 oil in that engine instead of the 10 - 30??
Pete...
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Pete & Cindy wrote:

The engines are designed to use 5w-20 or 5w-30 oil. There is no advantage to using heavier 10w-based oils unless you live in a really hot environment.
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I'm told the lighter weight oil is required because the fit of bearings is tighter than older engines and after some amount of miles you can switch to the 10W. Don't know if that is true or not.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

The issue is the size of the oil passages in the block and head, which don't get bigger with use.
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Brian Nystrom wrote:

Actually, I've been told that the issue is fuel economy. The lighter oils help a little on the EPA tests and every little bit helps.
Some time ago a guy on the chrysler auto newsgroup debunked the myth about tighter clearances. He posted several key clearances from a 1960s era engine and a 2000 era engine and they were basically identical.
Matt
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but my main question was the dealer says that I should be running 10w30 I wanna use 5w30 or 5w20.. but it was the service manager that last time suggested I used the lighter oil. so I did. this time when I went the Service Writer told me that I had to use the 10w30 cause that's what Hyundai recomends... shrug.. now more confused...

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Pete & Cindy wrote:

Do you have the owners manual for the car? If so, it should say what the recommended oil viscosity is in the manual. If not, I'd recommend buying a manual.
Matt
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As Matt said, you have to look in the manual and match that up with your ambient air temperature, wherever you live, to get what Hyundai recommends.
5w20, 5w30 and 10w30 are all acceptable according to my manual, but it really depends on where you live as to the "preferred" viscosity.
Eric
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Eric G. wrote:

Generally, you want to use the lightest weight that is acceptable for your climate. I use Castrol Syntec 5W20 as that meets my needs year round.
Matt
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Manual says its OK , Service Writer says its not..

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So, do you believe the manufacturer that had 100+ engineers design and test the engine at a cost of millions of dollars or the service writer that has an opinion from who knows where?
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Pete & Cindy wrote:

Personally, I will believe the person who designed and manufactures the car over the dealer personnel any day. No offense hyundaitech! Not that there can't be a mistake in the manual, but unless the service writer can show me a TSB that supersedes the manual recommendation, I'll stick with the manual recommendation.
Matt
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Actually, I think you're right on the money on this one, Matt. Who knows why the service advisor says what he says? Is 10W-30 the only thing the dealer has in bulk? Has he learned from his 1968 Charger? Who knows. Unless has some particular experinece with your engine and why it's bad to use anything other than 10W-30, there's no reason to take his advice over the manual.
Have a look at your manual and see what seems to be the best fit for your climate. Also check the oil cap. The manufacturer's preferred viscosity is often stamped onto the oil cap. Between the two, and whatever other factors you think are important, decide what's best for you. I can pretty much guarantee that as long as you don't stray from the recommended viscosities in the manual that you won't have an oil-related problem because of the particular viscosity you've used.
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Thanks to everyone that responded.. looked in the manual.. says in there and I quote for better gas milage 5w-30 Oil can be used.... not sure why the Service Writer was so hell and bent on make sure I put the other in but he wont in the future..:)
Pete..

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Hello Pete,
PC> not sure why the Service Writer was so hell and bent on make sure I PC> put the other in but he wont in the future..:)
Let me tell you about service writers. I don't know who they get to fill these positions but they are not always the sharpest tool in the box, and they don't always seem competent.
One Hyundai service adviser told me that he had no idea if they torqued wheel lug nuts at all, they 'just use the imapct wrench on them'. Didn't even know about the so-called 'torque sticks' (which BTW and IMO, are not accurate as a proper torque wrench). I stopped dealing with that service department as they seemed only able to talk to people who had more money/less time than they had sense.
Another Hyundai service adviser told me that he would have to 'drop my transmission' to cure the squeak in my clutch pedal. I asked him if he was joking, because all I wanted was for him to call one of his mechanics over with a can of WD-40 and lube the clutch pedal assembly itself. He said he was not joking and wondered when next I could bring in the car. I said forget it, and went home and applied the lubricant myself. Well it has been over a year now and no more squeak. As for my opinion of the technical ability of the service adviser -- lets just say it is not favourable. Either he does not listen or he is an idiot.
In my experience, it is always best to speak to a mechanic. The trick is getting past the adviser ...
Regards, Wayne Moses Houston, Texas
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No kiddin' Wayne. When was the last time that you saw a Service Writer who looked like he was a grisly old, time worn mechanic who just wanted to get off the wrenches, but wasn't quite ready to retire? Generally, they're younger folks (nothing against that) who have never done much wrench turning on the vehicles they are "expert" on... or any other vehicle for that matter. Their job is to process paper in order to create a schedule and a workflow for a shop - too bad they often try to play mechanic. They seldom do a good job at that role.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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Matt Whiting wrote:

True.
What possible correlation could there be between Chrysler engines and Hyundai engines? You're comparing apples to oranges.
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Brian Nystrom wrote:

Two correlations:
1. Most engine makers use the same basic machining equipment and the clearances really don't vary much across manufacturers. I have service manuals for everything from VW Beetles to my Sonata and the clearances just aren't that different.
2. My 2.4L Sonata engine was designed in conjunction with Chrysler.
Next question? :-)
Matt
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Your engine/transmission combination is used in several models since 1999, and the oil pan and transmission pan rarely leak. If repaired properly, the seals should last a long time.
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