Re: 2001 - XG300 30,000 MILE SERVICE

Some of the things I remember are: Oil filter, Fuel filter, PCV valve, transmission & cooling system flush, piston cleaning (?), check brakes, multi
point check and a couple of other things. What additional things do you think are beneficial at 30k? Thanks for you expert advice.
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johnam

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Here's my thoughts, which may not agree with anyone else's.
1. Oil and filter. I presume you're doing this at a time when an oil change is needed.
2. Fuel filter. I believe the recommended interval is 52,500 miles. My personal opinion is that 30k is a bit early for this and that the fuel filter will likely last for much more than 60k.
3. PCV valve. I don't recall whether this is on the maintenance list in the owner's manual. Very rarely have I ever seen one go bad, but it's cheap enough to be worth doing anyway. If it plugs up and you get excessive crankcase pressure, you could develop oil leaks.
4. Trans flush. Even though the recommended interval is 105k, I think this service or a fluid drain and fill around 30k is a good idea. Well, actually, I think the flush is a little excessive, but the drain and fill is a good idea. For the most part, I don't recommend this service for the customers where I work unless the fluid is really nasty or the vehicle is actually in the neighborhood of 105k. To put this all in perspective, I'm changing the fluid in my 1992 Taurus at 15k intervals. Tauruses are notorious for transmission problems, and I'm attempting to see if I can get the one I put in about 32k ago to last more than the seemingly normal 70k.
4. Coolant flush. You should do a flush or drain and fill every two years, regardless of mileage. I do a drain and fill in my car every year, but most people consider this overkill.
5. Piston cleaning. I'm not sure exactly what's being done here, but I suspect it's some sort of induction (intake) system cleaning. Unless there's some problem you're having that this will potentially solve, I'd consider this pure fluff.
6. Multipoint and brake inspection. Most shops will do this for free anyway. It's good to have done, but you really shouldn't consider this to be substantially adding to the value of the service.
You should also consider replacing the timing belt. I know this is a pricey item on this vehicle, but the maintenance interval is 4 years or 60k miles, whichever comes first. Presuming you're outside that period since you have a 2001 XG, you should consider replacing it. Should the belt break or strip, you'd be responsible for any damage that would cause (except in California where it would appear that Hyundai cannot make you change the timing belt to continue warranty coverage), and that would be far more expensive than replacing the belt. Chances are, it'll last another year, but if it doesn't, you'll probably see a repair bill the size of which you've never seen before.
And I'll add that when the car is there, they may find things they want to do to your car at additional expense. The service advisor should be able to clearly explain to you why the service is recommended and the potential consequences of not doing the service. If it sounds unclear or dubious, tell them you'd like to think it over and then contact someone knowledgeable who you know and trust. Too often, customers want to understand about their cars and where their service money is going, but no one gives them substantial information.
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As usual, excellent post, Mr. Hyundaitech. A couple of comments and questions.
*First, add me as one who does not consider a "drain and fill" for the radiator every year excessive. For me, it is part of winterizing that I do every Fall. When I see the condition of the coolant in every car I have changed it in, I would be very hesitant to wait two years to do that. That is, of course, for the cars that use the standard "green" coolant. I also have a car with the red "dex-cool" and I don't know what to do there.
*Since I have had failures in cars in years past due both to bad PCV valves, and clogged fuel filters, I have had very strict parameters on those also. Unless it is one of those "in-fuel-pump" filters located inside the fuel tank, or unless I just plain can't find the PCV valve (as in the case of my current '02 Elantra), I change both of those every year also. They are inexpensive, fairly easy, and good piece of mind.
*Assuming this "piston clean" is no more than a bottle of "complete fuel system" cleaner, how good and useful is any of that stuff? The only time I have ever used stuff like that is when my cars are either sluggish or jerky coming off the line. Then that stuff fixes them just fine.
*If you have an automatic tranny (in my case, an '02 Elantra and an '04 Kia Sedona), where the automatic transmission has not had a bad trouble index, would you still recommend a 15,000 mile change interval? Right now, I do a drain and fill on both every 30,000 miles (which in my driving, is little more than a year in each vehicle).
*BTW, while dealer service departments are only beginning to get into the "tire" business, should you perhaps add some tire services to the list? I have a lifetime "balance and rotation" on every set I buy, since proper balance means a lot to the handling. Does your department do that stuff yet?
Again, thanx for your excellent posts!
Tom Wenndt

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Tom says: "I also have a car with the red 'dex-cool' and I don't know what to do there." _________________________________________________
I've seen some ugly stuff with GM Dex-Cool(R). If I had a GM product, I'd flush out the Dex-Cool and either put in regular green and change it every year, or put in Toyota Original Red, a product for which I know of no issues. I've thought about putting Original Red in my Taurus, but I've got such good access to regular coolant that I've never done it. But again, I think I'm one of the radicals here. I've not seen any issues with the long-life coolants other than Dex-Cool.
Tom says: "Assuming this 'piston clean' is no more than a bottle of 'complete fuel system' cleaner, how good and useful is any of that stuff?" _________________________________________________
Unless it's got something weird in it, it pretty much can't hurt. But if you've got an engine that doesn't carbon, what's the point. Most modern engines carbon very little.
Tom says: "If you have an automatic tranny (in my case, an '02 Elantra and an '04 Kia Sedona), where the automatic transmission has not had a bad trouble index, would you still recommend a 15,000 mile change interval?" _________________________________________________
No. I think the 30k interval is good. I'm not sure about the Kia, but at least for the Elantra that exceeds the manufacturer's recommendation. I'd do 30k on most cars even if they had a 100k manufacturer recommendation.
Tom says: "BTW, while dealer service departments are only beginning to get into the 'tire' business, should you perhaps add some tire services to the list?" _________________________________________________
I'd say it's a good idea to rotate the tires every 7500 miles or so. For about 13 years, I drove only rear drive cars and didn't believe in rotation. I bought new tires two at a time and put the new ones on the rear for good bad weather traction. As the fronts wore out, I'd move the rear to the front and put two new tires on the rear. But with my first front drive car, I learned this was a bad plan. I had to buy four tires. The fronts wore out quickly (because they were on the drive axle), and the rears lasted only a little longer because they were feathered down to where there was no tread in spots. Since then, I've bought four at a time and kept them regularly rotated with much better results.
As for other tire services such as balancing or replacement, I'd recommend them only when needed due to vibration or wear.
We do tire work here, but anything involving tire replacement is very awkward because departmental management doesn't really want the hassle of pricing and procuring tires. Our 15k and 30k maintenance services include a wheel balance, but I think it's overkill to do it that frequently.
And, Tom, thanks for your posts, too. They're intelligent and clear, and most importantly, I almost always agree with them. :)
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The ugly stuff is very true about DexCool. Many people (myself included) replace it with the green stuff the first time it needs attention.
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hyundaitech wrote:

I used to rotate bias ply tires at 5K because they wore fairly fast compared to radials. I use 10K for radials because that is every other oil change for me and easy to remember. And it seems plenty for radials. I seldom get less than 50,000 on a set of tires and once got nearly 90,000 (Michelins on a Jeep Comanche 4x4 of all things).
Very few vehicles, even rear wheel drive like my Jeep and my Chevy pickup, will wear the tires evenly from side to side. The normal turning forces on the front tires almost always wear the outside a little faster than the inside. Rotation with cross-over evens this out. I believe I get at least an extra 10,000 miles on my tires due to the rotation schedule.
Matt
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hyundaitech wrote:

Rule #1 of Dexcool - once Dexcool, always Dexcool.
The stuff can be really evil. You mix it with green, it makes a fairly strong acid. Your heater core, radiator, water pump, and head gaskets will *not* appreciate this.
GM sells a chemical flush that is known to *really* flush out all the Dexcool for a safe conversion but its simply not worth the hassle. Dexcool isn't a *bad* product, its just badly marketed and documented.
Never *EVER* "top up" a Dexcool car with green! Pour in water, its muuuuuch better.
Personally I run 30/70 green/water and the suggested quantity of Redline water-wetter. If I drove some GM Dexcool-era vehicle I'd just stick to straight premix Dexcool (yeah, I know its not cheap). I've been told Dexcool will react with some 'types' of tap water and from what I've read on-line distilled water is not a good thing to use.
Bah... This is all nonsense - gimmie a 2-cycle air-cooled mechanically-operated direct-injection diesel. You can keep your spark ignition and your water cooling! :)
JS
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