Santa Fe 2.7 60K maintenance questions.

I have a 2003 Santa Fe 2.7 AWD and I have a question regarding the 60,000 mile timing belt & related maintenance.
This is currently on a lease (about 10 months yet) and we had been
discussing talking to the dealer about trading it in on a new model. It was approaching 60,000 miles, but because of the possibility of trading it, I held off on the 60K service.
Well, we talked to the dealer, and unfortunately it's not going to work out at this time, so I'm going to go ahead and get the timing belt (that service also includes the drive belt) and other related service work (the tech described it as basically replacing all the fluids, they have a detailed list). Total cost is estimated at about $1,000.
I have couple of questions regarding some of the items that need changed. I've checked the manual, and besides the few "required" items, are there other things that should be (or typically don't need) done at 60K? It seems like most are "inspect and replace if necessary", but it sounds like the dealer is automatically "replace". I don't want to skip anything that that would damage the car, but we're only keeping this less than another year and I don't want to be talked into spending hundreds on stuff that will never be a problem, for a car that I'm not keeping.
Also, by the time I can take it in, it will have about 60,200 miles on it. Is this something that I'm going to have any problems on since it has exceeded the 60,000 mile mark? Is there going to be any problems that I was beyond the warranty?
On an unrelated note, why would Hyundai USA discontinue the "loyalty rebate"? About a year after we got the Santa Fe, we went back and purchased a Sonata. At the time, the dealer told us that since we were staying with the Hyundai line, the manufacturer offered a $1,000 loyalty rebate to current Hyundai owners. That was one of the things we were hoping might have made the difference this time. However, the dealer said that Hyundai no longer offers that rebate, and he didn't know why. I know Hyundai has come a long way from their early reputation, but I would think they're still not at the level where they can afford to ignore consumer loyalty. <ranting mode off>
Mike O.
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Go to a good independent shop and have the belt replaced and the other items specified on the Service Manual. The dealer is more interested in extracting dollars than fixing your car. Replacing hte belt is not cheap, but is is going to save youhundeds of dollars.

200 miles is not likely to be a problem unless the belt actully goes at say, 60,199.

It does not matter what you or I think, only what the marketing people at Hyundai think. Rebate programs change all the time.
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Actually, I checked around on the belt. An independent and a local Goodyear service center both quoted around $650 for the belt replacement. The Hyundai dealer service department quoted the timing belt replacement (including the drive belt) for $525. Other than regular maintenance (oil changes, brakes, etc.) I've not had to get much done to the car, but on the few bigger things I have needed, the cost at the dealer has been the same or less than the cost through other places.
Also, the the salesman that we've dealt with for the last two purchases (who we worked with last Saturday about the possible trade in) said to let him know when I was bringing it in for service and he'd see "what he could do" on the price.
I'm more concerned that with the other 60K service they're going to come back with a bunch of "you also need to replace...." I just want to be prepared to either say yes, or tell them I don't need it at this time. I know the basic stuff, but I know there's a lot I don't know..
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Only thing they should be doing is the list from the Hyundai service manual. Many dealers make their own list to make more money. Get that straight first.
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items: flush the coolant system flush and fill the transmission rotate and balance the tires oil & filter change check brake system, lube calipers check hoses, belts, ignition system, emission system, exhaust system, test battery
In the manual most of those items are "inspect and replace as necessary", so it sounds like they're pretty close to the required service. The coolant and transmission flush/fill are required at 60K
I could do some of that, but especially since this is a lease I don't want any problems that may come back to bite me when we turn it in eventually..
The timing belt service includes the timing belt, tensioner, and "balance belt" (not sure what that is, is it the "drive" belt?). They also give you some incentive to get the 60K at the same time since if you get the belt replacement at the same time as the 60K service, they knock about $150 off the timing belt replacement.
The total for all that (60K service, & timing/drive belt replacement) is around $1,000. Never happy about spending that kind of cash, but from what I've seen, it is a lot of labor involved.
One thing listed in the manual that isn't covered on their standard 60K check is changing the transfer case oil (I believe the manual said 50K; it hasn't been done yet...). The dealer web site lists this at about $90, so I'll probably have that done, too.
Mike O.
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Well I ended up getting it all taken care of. After talking to the salesman we've been dealing with, they gave us some discounts and I ended up paying about $600+tax total for everything, including the timing belt & tensioner, drive belt, the coolant & transmission flush, and other check/adjust items listed on their 60K service (mentioned above). They also did the transfer case oil change, too, as part of that total price, so I figure I didn't do too bad..
Thanks again for the various comments and advice.
Mike O.
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That sound like a much better price and now you should be set for a long time.
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Mike, I have a 2002 Santa Fe 2.7L 2WD, but the engine should be pretty identical. Yesterday I replaced the timing belt. Took about 7 hours. One hour was figuring out how to get the crankshaft pulley off. If you're mechanically adept, you can buy the replacement timing belt for about $90 at the Hyundai dealer (ask for 10% off at the parts counter - they should give you a discount if you ask), and save yourself $500. It's not difficult - just a bit time-intensive to remove everything to get to the belt. If you have access to Chilton manuals or AllData, then you can get the procedures. (I used Chilton, and found a few differences between the diagrams and my specific engine, so a little mechanical know-how comes in handy. It's because Hyundai probably makes small configuration changes from year to year, and lots of times Chilton manuals will try to cover multiple years with a single diagram.)
The Santa Fe user manual specifies replacing the spark plugs, coolant, and timing belt at 60,000 miles. You don't need to worry that your at 60,200 miles UNLESS your timing belt breaks before you get it in (EXTREMELY UNLIKELY). I had almost 65,000 miles on my vehicle, and the timing belt I removed was still in good condition (thought not as good as a new belt). The engine timing belt is not built like a cheap-o microwave or washer that craps out 10 days after the warranty expires.
Here's the basics for changing a Hyundai Santa Fe 2.7L timing belt:
OVERALL: Everything is metric. You'll need a good metric socket set. In my opinion, the longer the socket wrench you have, the easier and quicker the job will go. You'll find most bolts are "stuck" and take a good amount of force to initially break loose. But with a long socket wrench, you don't have to push that hard to apply this force. Once the bolts initially break free, most of them can be unscrewed the rest of the way by hand. Seriously, having a long socket wrench will take an hour off the job. Also, a good air-driven impact wrench is a MUST for this job. You cannot complete the job without it (unless you have a special tool to hold the crankshaft pulley from rotating while unbolting it).
1. Remove the plastic engine cover. 5 or 6 bolts.
2. Remove the front passenger wheel. Put an extra jack stand underneath the car frame for safety. I actually dropped my vehicle on the rotor because the Hyundai Santa Fe's rear spare tire carrier bolt gets so rusty, it really shakes the car trying to unscrew it and get the spare tire out (and that's after two liberal dousings with WD-40) - the vibrations and shaking can cause the vehicle to fall off the wimpy car jack that comes with the vehicle.
3. Remove the plastic wheel well panel behind the front passenger wheel. It's held on by 3 or 4 bolts along the top of the panel. To see these bolts, you kinda have to get your head into the wheel well and look up at the top of the panel. Removing this panel gives you access to the front of the engine (which faces the passenger side of the vehicle).
4. Remove the serpentine accessory belt. Just take an extra-long socket wrench - the wrench's square fits in the end of the belt tensioner - and pull the tensioner clockwise to take tension off the belt, and then slip the belt off one of the pulleys. Easiest to do this coming through the wheel well, but could probably be done from above, too. The belt will not actually come completely off until you unbolt the tensioner.
5. Unbolt the serpentine belt tensioner. There are two long bolts that hold it on. Take the tensioner and serpentine belt off. You'll see that the tensioner covered a hole in the timing belt case, and through that hole you should now see a portion of the cogged timing belt.
6. Unbolt the power steering pump pulley. It's the top pulley in the middle. You'll need to stick something through one of the holes in the pulley to keep the pulley from turning as you unbolt it. I used a smaller socket wrench with a long socket on it, holding on to the socket wrench and sticking the socket through the pulley's hole, jamming the socket against the body of the power steering pump behind the pulley. Remove the nut and the pulley.
7. You may need to unbolt the cruise control module at this point in preparation for jacking the engine. I did as a precaution, but discovered that on the 2002 Santa Fe, I really didn't need to. However, I have read an internet post that pointed out that on their Santa Fe, failure to unbolt the cruise control module caused the cable to come uncrimped when the engine was jacked, and that caused the engine to race after everything was put back together. Unbolting the module prevents its cable from getting pulled too far when you jack the engine.
8. Place a block of wood on a hydraulic jack underneath the engine oil pan, and jack it up to support the front of the engine. ("Jack it up" here means to raise up the jack, not "mess it all up".) The oil pan is immediately below the front of the engine (just behind the pulleys).
9. Unbolt the front engine bracket and take it off. This is done from the top. One bolt on the vehicle frame side (on top of the wheel well) and three bolts and/or nuts on the engine side.
10. Remove the serpentine belt idler pulley. Easy to come off. No need to hold pulley from turning, because the bolt goes through to the engine. Be careful once you get the bolt off - basically you have this pulley sandwiched by two plates - make sure you don't lose the back plate and you know which way it goes back on the pulley.
11. Remove the other half of the engine bracket still attached to the engine. First, you'll need to remove the small bolt on this bracket that faces the front of the vehicle. This bolt holds on the engine oil dipstick tube. Then, you'll find another small bolt facing the passenger side near the top of the bracket - this bolt is impossible to see, but you'll be able to feel for it. Access this bolt from under the hood. Then return to the wheel well and remove three large bolts and the bracket will be free.
Before you remove the crankshaft pulley, you'll need to make sure the timing belt is properly aligned. To do so, you must remove the top half of the timing belt cover next.
12. Remove top half of the timing belt cover, by removing three bolts around rear sprocket, three bolts around front sprocket, and one long bolt at the bottom of this cover. This cover only goes halfway down the engine, so you can get to all these bolts from the engine compartment. I believe they require a 10mm socket.
13. Once the top half of the cover is removed, you will want to locate the timing marks on the exposed sprockets. It's a little dot imprinted on the front of each sprocket. Best viewed looking under the hood from the passenger side. The dots need to be aligned with the timing marks on the engine case. The timing mark on the engine case for the left sprocket (towards the rear of the vehicle) is a little notch located at about 11:00, and the timing mark for the right sprocket (towards the front of the vehicle) is at about 1:00.
14. Once you've located the timing marks on the sprockets and the engine, put a long wrench on the crankshaft pulley center nut and rotate the pulley clockwise until you get the top sprocket timing marks in place. (The crankshaft pulley is the very bottom center pulley. You access it through the wheel well.) You'll notice that when you get the top timing marks in place, the crankshaft pulley timing mark will be more or less aligned with a protrusion on the timing belt cover (at about the 1:00 position). If the bottom pulley is not perfectly aligned with one of the marks, don't worry about it. The important thing is to have the top timing marks for both sprockets perfectly aligned. Once you remove the crankshaft pulley and bottom half of the pulley cover, you'll see that the crankshaft sprocket tooth is properly aligned. You'll also notice that you have to turn the crankshaft pulley two entire revolutions to get the top sprockets to turn a single revolution. They are geared exactly 2:1.
15. Soak the crankshaft pulley bolt with WD-40 where its shoulder meets the pulley. I found this to be important.
16. Use an air impact wrench to remove the crankshaft pulley bolt (counterclockwise). I found that the air impact wrench on maximum setting was enough to loosen the bolt without actually turning the crankshaft. It may take about half a minute to loosen up. If it doesn't want to come off, try some more WD-40 and let it sit awhile. If you try to use a socket wrench, you'll just end up turning the engine backwards. AN AIR IMPACT WRENCH IS A MUST TO DO THIS, unless you have a special tool to hold the crankshaft pulley still while turning its bolt counterclockwise. The crankshaft pulley bolt will come off along with a thick spacer.
17. Remove the crankshaft pulley. You'll probably need to wiggle it back and forth as you pull it straight off. The more you can wiggle it, the easier it is to come off. The pulley is "keyed" to the crankshaft with a pin (located now at about the 1:00 position). This pin will stay on the crankshaft, and will be what you use to make sure the crankshaft is aligned once you get the new timing belt on.
18. Remove the lower timing belt cover. 10mm socket is used to remove the 4 or so bolts holding it on (best accessed through wheel well).
19. Notice now that the crankshaft (where you pulled the crankshaft pulley off from) has its pin (the pin we mentioned in step 17) aligned with a timing mark on the engine. Take note of this alignment! You'll see the teeth on the crankshaft that drive the timing belt. One of these teeth is aligned with the pin, and therefore aligned with the mark on the engine.
NOTE: Take stock of how taut the timing belt is at this point. This is what the belt feels like under tension. It's pretty tense, right?
20. Remove the timing belt auto-tensioner. It is the cylinder-looking thing up and to the left of the crankshaft. Two bolts hold it on. Unbolt these bolts, and tension on the timing belt is released.
21. After removing the timing belt auto-tensioner, use a large C-clamp to slowly compress the pin in the auto-tensioner all the way, until you can slip a pin or smooth end of an old drill bit in through the little hole on the top of the auto-tensioner. This hole locks the tensioner's pin in the compressed position. Before you put the pin in, cover the pin with WD-40, and spray a little WD-40 in the little hole on the top of the auto-tensioner too (front and back). The pin should go all the way through from the front, through the center pin, and through the back. Enough of the pin (or old drill bit) should be sticking out the front so you can later grab it with a pair of pliers and pull it out).
22. Enough tension should have been released from the timing belt so you can now gently pull it off.
CAUTION: Be very careful not to rotate the belt at this point as you are taking it off, or as you are putting the new belt on. The reason is because the left top sprocket has its springs in the compressed position (at the top of the hill, so to speak). If you rotate this left top sprocket even one tooth, its compressed energy will cause it to rotate about 8 teeth, taking it out of timing with the crankshaft and the right top sprocket. This is the voice of experience talking.
CHECK: Check the idler and tensioner pulleys that they are in good condition, and turn freely with little to no play. Replace if needed.
23. Temporarily put the crankshaft pulley back on (no need to put its bolt in), and rotate the crankshaft pulley by hand back (counter clockwise) about 5 degrees. Shouldn't be too hard to do, because the crankshaft is not in a position where it takes much force to move at this point. Pull the pulley back off and check where you are at. Keep doing this until you have moved the crankshaft by one tooth. In other words, you need to rotate the crankshaft so that instead of the crankshaft pin being aligned with the mark on the engine, the tooth to the right (clockwise) of that pin is aligned with the mark on the engine. WHY DO WE DO THIS? Because there will be a little bit of slack between the right top sprocket and the crankshaft sprocket when you install the new belt. You'll find that after taking up this slack, the crankshaft will be properly aligned with the top sprockets. But don't worry. We'll be double-checking to make sure we got it right.
NOTE: The timing belt tensioner pulley is towards the left (towards rear of vehicle), and the idler pulley is towards the right (front of vehicle).
24. Put on the new timing belt in this order: First, put it on the crankshaft sprocket at the bottom. Next, from under the hood pull the timing belt snug against the idler pulley (don't pull hard - just enough to remove most of the slack), and wrap the belt counter clockwise around the right top sprocket (the sprocket towards the front of the vehicle). With the teeth of the belt engaged on the right top sprocket, pause to check the play in the belt between the sprocket and the crankshaft sprocket. Remember when you took stock of how taut the old belt was? The belt should not be this tight. But then, it shouldn't be so loose that it comes off the idler pulley. There should be just a little bit of slack, which will be taken up when you later on replace the crankshaft pulley. Continue wrapping the new timing belt around the water pump pulley (smack dab in the middle of the engine, between all 3 sprockets, and then back up around the left top sprocket (toward the rear of the vehicle). Make sure that there is AS LITTLE PLAY in the belt between the two top sprockets as possible. The belt should be nice and snug between these two. The belt should be pretty tight at this point. You should have just enough play left in the belt to muscle it over the tensioner pulley (which is currently not under tension). If that is so, you can be assured that your timing belt is probably properly installed.
25. Now we check the timing belt installation. DO NOT CHECK THE SPROCKET ALIGNMENT YET. FIRST WE HAVE TO ROTATE THE TIMING BELT CLOCKWISE TO DISTRIBUTE THE TENSION ON THE BELT PROPERLY. Bolt the tensioner pulley auto-tensioner back on (two bolts). In one quick movement, pull out the pin (or old drill bit) from the auto-tensioner with a pair of pliers.
26. Temporarily put the crankshaft pulley back on, and screw in on with its center bolt.
27. With a long wrench on the crankshaft pulley center bolt, rotate this pulley two entire revolutions until the two top sprocket timing marks have made one entire revolution and are lined up once again with the timing marks on the engine. As you start to rotate the crankshaft pulley, you should see the auto-tensioner pin come out and return to its normal length. The entire timing belt should return to the tension you observed on the old belt before removing the auto-tensioner. If not, then you need to remove the auto-tensioner and check it.
28. Remove the crankshaft pulley center bolt with the air impact wrench, and remove the pulley.
29. CHECK THE ALIGNMENT CAREFULLY. ALL THREE SPROCKETS SHOULD NOW BE ALIGNED TO THEIR TIMING MARKS. If even one timing mark is off, you'll need to pull the belt back off and reinstall. It is easy to see if a timing mark is off by one tooth. Just look at the belt and the sprockets and observe the distance from one tooth to the next. If any one of the three timing marks is off by this amount or more, your timing is maligned. But if the marks are off only a smidgen (a small fraction of the distance between two adjacent teeth), then your timing is aligned.
30. IF YOUR TIMING BELT IS MISALIGNED, GO BACK TO STEP 20. Note that it is easier to align the crankshaft individually than the top sprockets, so if the top sprockets are in sync with each other but out of sync with the crankshaft, turn the crankshaft until the top sprockets are aligned with their timing marks, remove the belt, then temporarily put the crankshaft pulley back on and adjust it.
NOTE: It is ok to turn the crankshaft back a few degrees if you need to. You may be able to do this by hand by just pushing the crankshaft pulley on the crankshaft (without its mounting bolt) and turning the pulley by hand. However, if you need to adjust the top sprockets, you'll probably need to turn the crankshaft in clockwise direction using a socket on its center bolt. However, if you need to go an entire revolution on one of the top sprockets, you'll need to do so with the timing belt installed, so the entire engine rotates more or less in sync.
NOTE 2: After each time you rotate the timing belt via the crankshaft pulley's center mounting bolt, you'll need to remove the crankshaft pulley via the air impact wrench.
31. IF YOUR TIMING BELT IS NOW ALIGNED (all three timing marks on the sprockets are lined up with the three timing marks on the engine) , IT'S TIME TO PUT EVERYTHING BACK TOGETHER, in the reverse order of what you took it off.
NOTES: When reinstalling the top half of the engine bracket (the one that attaches between engine and frame), you may need to jack the engine a little higher in order to get this bracket snug against the bottom half of the engine bracket.
DO NOT RESTART YOUR ENGINE UNTIL YOU WORK YOUR WAY BACK PAST STEP 4. (But don't put the vehicle in drive until you work your way back past step 2.)
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I replaced the timing belt on my 02 Sonata at 80k. I was pushing it but my family mechanic said today's belts are made to last considerably longer than belts a decade ago and getting 80k out of it wouldn't be a stretch. The old belt looked to be in decent shape and wasn't cracked or damaged when removed. Everyone else's mileage may vary. Of course, if the engine would have crapped out at 60,001 they would have blamed the timing belt though.
I bought a replacement timing belt directly from Gates.com and paid around $45 with shipping if I remember right. Dealer wanted $120. It's likely you could buy the part and have another place replace it for you. The dealership replaced mine but wouldn't warranty the belt (never mind that Gates make the belts for Hyundai). I probably could have taken it somewhere else but a lot of shops won't replace or repair if you bring in your own part (because of warranty).
The dealership charges more than one ought to pay for the service but it usually gets done faster. If $1000 isn't going to set you back, let the dealer worry about it. Otherwise, shop around and bring the service list from Hyundai to a couple shops and see what price they quote you. My dealership wants $400 to replace my slightly bent rear lower control arm. Firestone would charge me $139 plus tax for the same service and part.
Not sure about the customer loyalty rebate going away. That's sad if it is because I was looking forward to it when I bought my next Hyundai.
- Thee Chicago Wolf
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Regarding your final inquiry (on the owner loyalty rebate), it is hard to say what drives the whats, whens and hows of the marketing people. I know that, until VERY recently, there was one on every single Hyundai vehicle, at least in most parts of the country.
I will say that Hyundai and Kia are now one company, and if you are watching their product line, their vehicles are becoming more and more like each other. For whatever reason, Kia currently continues to have both that owner loyalty bonus, or the competitive owner bonus (for those who own competing makes and models) on all models except for the Rio and Spectra.
Which means that one possibility is to look at the Kia sister model of whichever Hyundai you're thinking about. It's even easier to sort out when your same dealer sells both, and is a good dealer (as mine does and is).

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Looks like there are some loyalty deals http://www.hyundaiusa.com/financing/specialoffers/special_offers.aspx
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> GUEST wrote: > I have a 2003 Santa Fe 2.7 AWD and I have a question regarding the 60,000 > mile timing belt & related maintenance. > > This is currently on a lease (about 10 months yet) and we had been > discussing talking to the dealer about trading it in on a new model. It > was approaching 60,000 miles, but because of the possibility of trading it, > I held off on the 60K service. > > Well, we talked to the dealer, and unfortunately it's not going to work out > at this time, so I'm going to go ahead and get the timing belt (that service > also includes the drive belt) and other related service work (the tech > described it as basically replacing all the fluids, they have a detailed > list). Total cost is estimated at about $1,000. > > I have couple of questions regarding some of the items that need changed. > I've checked the manual, and besides the few "required" items, are there > other things that should be (or typically don't need) done at 60K?
It > seems like most are "inspect and replace if necessary", but it sounds like > the dealer is automatically "replace". I don't want to skip anything that > that would damage the car, but we're only keeping this less than another > year and I don't want to be talked into spending hundreds on stuff that will > never be a problem, for a car that I'm not keeping. > > Also, by the time I can take it in, it will have about 60,200 miles on it. > Is this something that I'm going to have any problems on since it has > exceeded the 60,000 mile mark? Is there going to be any problems that I > was beyond the warranty? > > On an unrelated note, why would Hyundai USA discontinue the "loyalty rebate"? > About a year after we got the Santa Fe, we went back and purchased a Sonata. > At the time, the dealer told us that since we were staying with the Hyundai > line, the manufacturer offered a $1,000 loyalty rebate to current Hyundai > owners. That was one of the things we were hoping might have made the > difference this time. However, the dealer said that Hyundai no longer > offers that rebate, and he didn't know why. I know Hyundai has come a long > way from their early reputation, but I would think they're still not at the > level where they can afford to ignore consumer loyalty. <ranting mode off> > > Mike O.
My local trusted mechanic (not a dealer) replaced my 2002 Sonata 2.7 timing belt for $325 for parts, labor, tax and all. The car had 70,000 miles on it and the old belt looked new to me. I kept the old belt for proof of adherance to warranty requirements.
I drained out coolant and put a new gallon back in. Still using the spark plugs with 75,000 on them. When it start to miss or the gas milage drops off, I will change them.
The manual says 105,000 miles before changing the transmission fluid but because of a comment by HyundaiTech I saved up my money, bought a case of Hyundai fluid and changed it last week. The Hyundai manual says to disconnect the fluid tube that connects the lower radiator to the transmission and idle the engine in neutral for one minute. Then remove the drain plug and let drain. Replace the plug, add fluid ( it does not say how much, only fill it). Then run engine with cooling tube still disconected for one minute.
Connect tube and fill with fluid. All this was not difficult to do, but get a big pan to catch the fluid. My wife was upset about the mess in the garage. But it all seemed to work well.
Don't know if any of this helps but it is an example of another's real world experience in the world of Hyundai.
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