Santa Fe Fuel delivery

Hey all. Good forum. Been reading and researching as much as I can.
My '01 2.7 Santa Fe is taking too long to start only when cold. Check engine light is functioning normally and does not indicate a problem.
Cranking is normal and strong. I just have to pump the pedal a few times to get it going. There is a gas smell after I get started. Runs fine after that although its possible I have lost a little mileage. I got 22 mpg on a tank today doing a leisurely highway drive where I would normally expect 24. Not exactly hard evidence, but possible info.
My regular oil change guys did a pressure check and told me it was low and I needed a fuel pump. Their quoted price was high enough to inspire me to look at doing it myself. However, as I began researching the problem I have become suspicious of their diagnosis. My local dealer was also helpful on the phone and believes that the pumps are usually very reliable. He suggested a possible vacuum loss which sort of makes sense as it "feels" like the fuel isn't getting to the injectors initally and might have bled off or drained down hill back to the tank.
He suggested I pull off the vacuum line above the injectors and check for drops of fuel. It was dry. I didn't check any other sections of the hose as they were buried back between the engine and the firewall.
What else can I look at before paying the dealer to run the diagnostics ? I think I am able to replace the pump on my own if needed. I am suspicious of the fuel pressure regulator as well, but have no idea how to check that. Plus, I get nervous about anything on the fuel line itself if I don't see an easy way to disconnect.
I am just over 90,000 miles and have been really happy with only needing light bulbs and a couple ball joints in this vehicle for non-scheduled maintenance.
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I'd say the fuel pressure regulator is a strong candidate. While some fuel pressure regulators fail in a way that bleeds fuel into the vacuum line, this is rarely the case with Hyundai. More frequently, the regulator fails to seal and bleeds the fuel pressure off into the tank while the engine is not running. You then experience the long crank time because the fuel pump must build the pressure back up.
It'd be good to know the fuel pressure readings from the shop that did the fuel pressure check, too.
If you can replace a fuel pump yourself, you'll also be able to replace the fuel pressure regulator yourself. Unclamp and remove hose, unbolt regulator, and remove. I think you'll also find that the price of a regulator is at least competitive with diagnosis. If this were my vehicle and I didn't have a fuel pressure gauge available, I'd toss the regulator on and see if it took care of the problem.
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Thanks much Hyundaitech.
Put the regulator on (you are right, it was easy) and everything is good now. Starts right up warm or cold.
As an interesting aside, I could only find the pressure regulator locally at the dealership. (About five parts franchises available in town) Seems a lot of Hyundai parts for the Santa Fe aren't stocked yet. Probably related to the warranty periods only beginning to run out I would guess.
Thanks again !!
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