Santa Fe Transmission Fluid

Page 1 of 2  
Hi, Hyundai Tech,
I have a 2006 Santa Fe. my local shop found that my transmission fluid is in dark brown color and had burn smell though there is only 15k miles,
then they changed the transmission fluid 3 days ago, but they used ATF+4, they said it is compatible with SPIII.
After search this forum, I am concerned about it, Some recommend to use OEM type fluid, while others said it is okay to use ATF+4 which is a more advanced product.
In your opinion, is it okay? or should I have it re-flushed with SPIII?
-- Message posted using http://www.talkaboutautos.com/group/alt.autos.hyundai / More information at http://www.talkaboutautos.com/faq.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've no experience with ATF+4 in Hyundais. It's possible it'll be okay. Possibly not. Bottom line, it's not the specified fluid. Take it back and demand the shop flush the transmission with the correct fluid. If they won't, take it to the dealer and have it flushed with the correct fluid, even if you must pay for it. It won't be cheap, but it'll be far less expensive than paying for a transmission in the event Hyundai denies warranty coverage.
As mentioned in the recent XG thread, it's not abnormal for the fluid to turn brown after a relatively short amount of driving. Typically, it'll still be relatively transparent. If it's opaque or has a burnt odor, then it should be changed.
-- Message posted using http://www.talkaboutautos.com/group/alt.autos.hyundai / More information at http://www.talkaboutautos.com/faq.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thank you very much. Hyundai gave me very confusing maintenance guide. User's manual suggests to go with month and milage whichever comes first, the online quick guide and Hyundai dealr service manager sugguest go with milage, especially for transmission fluid. If going with milage, it does not make sense to change transmission oil at 15k! that means I need to do that every 24 months! I drive my car to work, shop, church, and it is about 50% free way.
What is your opinion?
It really discourage me from buying Hyundai any more.
-- Message posted using http://www.talkaboutautos.com/group/alt.autos.hyundai / More information at http://www.talkaboutautos.com/faq.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The maintenance interval for transmission fluid in your owner's manual is guide you should follow. If you want to go exactly by the letter of the manual, you'll need to change it at 105,000 miles, or seven years, whichever comes first. You'll also need to replace the fluid if the required inspection at 30,000 miles (or two years) indicates it needs to be replaced.
My opinion, however, is there's no reason to change transmission fluid based on time. It should be based on mileage and condition. So I'd say if the condition hasn't warranted up to 105k, change it then.
-- Message posted using http://www.talkaboutautos.com/group/alt.autos.hyundai / More information at http://www.talkaboutautos.com/faq.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Quote: >You'll also need to replace the fluid if the

Question: Required inspection by Whom? Dealer or anyone.?
--


"hyundaitech" < snipped-for-privacy@not.public.com> wrote in message
news: snipped-for-privacy@localhost.talkaboutautos.com...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Anyone. If you look at your owner's manual, you'll see an "I" at 30k for the transmissin fluid. This means it should be inspected, and if necessary, replaced. At 105k, you'll see an "R."
-- Message posted using http://www.talkaboutautos.com/group/alt.autos.hyundai / More information at http://www.talkaboutautos.com/faq.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
replying to hyundaitech, sagarcia wrote:

I have a 2008 santa fe with 88,000 miles and the transmission fluid has never been changed. Fluid is brown, but not black or smell burnt. I've read that some say not to flush because deposits may break away sometime after flush and damage parts also the new fluid may wash all the friction off clutch packs and some of the particles that are helping keep the seals from leaking. If the fluid is changed, then the new fluid may start cleaning and dissolving the clutch material that is helping to keep some of the interior sealed. Should I do a partial fluid change only?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This fluid turns brown relatively early on. Unless it's particularly opaque, you probably don't need to do anything. The recommended maintenance interval is 105,000 miles.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
replying to hyundaitech , sergio wrote:

opaque, you probably don't need to do anything. The recommended maintenance interval is 105,000 miles.
Thanks, Hyundaimech,
The reason I had some concern and wanted to be proactive is because I had a mazada 626 and it had 89,000 when I had the transmission flushed and three months later the transmission went out on it. The transmission was working fine. I just wanted to clean it out for the long haul. I know the maintenance interval, I am just trying to make it last a little longer. I also have a 2011 elantra with 35,500, would you recommend doing a pump inlet flush? Does Hyundai do a pump inlet flush?
Thanks again,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I wouldn't expect a flush to hurt the Santa Fe or the Elantra, but it'll be quite pricey on the Elantra, which uses SPIV-M fluid, intended to last for the lifetime of the car.
As to whether a pump inlet flush is done will depend on the dealer's equipment.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/26/2015 1:18 PM, sergio wrote:

Similar to my experience with my Buick. The only time I ever did a tranny oil change and it cost big bucks. The rest of the car went to crap soon after anyway.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In typed:

I have a 2004 3.5L Santa fe with about 125,000 miles on it and never had any transmission maintenance done on it. I also don't expect to be keeping the vehicle for too much longer.
However, what type of transmission maintenance is typically, or supposed to be, done at the 105,000 mile interval?
Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, March 26, 2015 at 3:14:29 PM UTC-4, TomR wrote:

Fluid replacement.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In typed:

Okay, thanks. That's what I was wondering -- if it just meant replacing the transmission fluid.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"TomR" wrote in message typed:

Okay, thanks. That's what I was wondering -- if it just meant replacing the transmission fluid.
Note that he DID NOT say Fluid Flush!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In typed:

I wasn't sure what you meant about the difference between "fluid replacement" and "Fluid Flush".
But, I just did a Google search and it appears that a fluid replacement just means to drain the old transmission fluid and refill with new transmission fluid.
And, a "fluid flush" appears to mean, drain the old transmission fluid, flush out the system with a fluid that contains a solvent, and then refill the system with new transmission fluid.
Is that correct?
Is one approach better or worse than the other?
Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
TomR wrote:

Personally, I would not do a flush unless the transmission has had a failure that put a lot of debris through the transmission. And even then, one would have expected a thorough cleaning as part of the repair procedure.
Dealers will try to sell the flush as it is a big money maker for them. I am sure it helps loosen up some varnish and gunk inside, but this is only advantageous if you are sure it all gets flushed out. Most engines and transmissions will run for years with a lot of gunk inside as long as it remains in place. Breaking it up is only a good thing if you are sure it all gets out. And with modern lubricants that are changed per the schedule, the build up of gunk is surprising small. I have removed the valve cover on engines with well over 100K miles and they had just a light brown varnish on most of the parts (I use Mobil 1 and change at ~5K intervals).
I regard it a little like asbestos in a building. At first, the rage was to remove it all. Then testing showed that removal stirred up the fibers and spread them around such that it was nearly impossible to clean them up. So, it became policy to leave the asbestos undisturbed if at all possible and removal became a huge effort as you had to seal off the area, use water, etc. I view the gunk in my engines and transmissions the same way. I leave well enough alone unless I need to open up the engine or transmission for repair and then I try to remove ALL of the gunk mechanically and chemically before re-assembly.
Just my $0.02.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/28/2015 9:26 AM, TomR wrote:

Voyager gave a good explanation. Over time, oils can break down and lose some of their properties. Generally, it is a very long time, thus the 100,000 mile or more recommendation. All you have to do is drain and replace. You may not get 100%, but you get enough to refresh the properties of the oil.
Just anecdotal evidence, but I've heard of a lot of people having problems after a flush. Crap gets stirred up and if left behind, it will do damage down the road. The only way you can truly clean the transmission it to disassemble it, clean every part, then reassemble.
I'd never flush a tranny, not would I ever let a Jiffy Lube guy touch my car in any way.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In typed:

Thanks Ed, Voyager, Partner, hyundaitech.
I see the difference now between just draining and replacing the transmission fluid versus doing a "flush". I definitely don't want the "flush".
I'll have to look at my vehicle and see how easy or hard it would be for me to just drain and replace the transmission fluid on my own. When doing a quick check online, I don't see any places that say they will just do a transmission fluid drain and replace.
My vehicle is a 2004 Hyundai Santa Fe 3.5L V6 AWD. I just checked and it has 124,000 miles on it and it never had the transmission fluid changed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, March 28, 2015 at 9:25:46 AM UTC-4, TomR wrote:

ust

n


l

In most cases, a "flush" is simply hooking a device up to the cooler lines and exchanging fluid. You'll replace more of the fluid this way, so it's b etter in that sense, but it's not like power-flushing debris out of the tra nsmission. The only way any internal gunk is going to get removed is with the additional detergents in the new fluid or by taking the transmission ap art and phyisically removing it (and probably replacing clutches and seals for a complete overhaul while you're at it).
The cleaning agent, additive, or whatever else you want to call it is prett y much snake oil. In fact, Hyundai specifies in a TSB that no additives ar e to be installed, just factory-recommended fluid.
And just in case it wasn't clear, I purposely didn't say "flush."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.