timing belt

I just had my car at the dealer's and they recommended that I have the timing belt changed. This is a fairly expensive service. Even though my car only has 43,000 miles on it, it is six years old. They
recommend 60,000 miles or six years. I have to have the tire rod ends done immediately and then rear brakes so it will be almost impossible for me to afford this timing belt this month. I was just looking for opinions as to whether it would be safe to wait a month or so given the mileage. Thanks!
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I'd wait. While I'd not go too long, a couple of months does not seem out of order with that low miles.
What is wrong that the tie rod ends have to be done already? That seems premature. I'd get an opinion from a good local independent garage. Dealers tend to be higher priced for many service items and some service writers recommend things that may not be needed. They get a commission. .
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You are right there. My sons Lantra has 220,000 k on the clock and front suspension is still solid. The rear brakes still have a reasonable lining thickness after that mileage. Is yours 6 years old re the belt?. The advice to get an independent assesment is spot on. John
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I'm curious about the six year recommendation for the timing belt. I would think wear & tear on the belt would be mostly reflected in mileage. It may be necessary to change it to stay in compliance with the warranty, but is it necessary in terms of actual wear?
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Rubber and plastics become brittle over time. There is now a recommendation to change tires after some number of years no matter how much tread they have on them. Exposure to UV speeds up the drying process.
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Victek wrote:

You think wrong. Think of what the belt is made from...
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I'd have someone else look at your frontend. 43,000 miles is very early for tie rods to be wearing out.
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When I had the oil changed, they told me there that the right tie rod end was loose. They gave me a much higher price than the dealer. Then the dealer told me I need both and should change the timing belt as well. The brakes I probably can get a cheaper price somewhere else. But, if both places remarked on the tie rod ends, what else can I do? I'd be too afraid to let it go. I have to say, I was a bit surprised given the low mileage. I didn't think I would have to worry about it for a while yet.
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Don't forget that YOU mentioned it to the dealer and that's like dangling a carrot in front of a rabbit. They, of course, would tell you 'Absolutely, they are shot'. I'd still take it to someone you think you can trust.

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AND it's not just the tie rod ends. As soon as you get that done, they'll remind you that you need a front end alignment, which you do it you replace them. There goes another $50 or more.

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tonita wrote:

I would not wait too long. A timing belt is made of rubber/polymer with reinforcing fibers that are polymer also. Materials such as this deteriorate as much from time as from mileage. Think of tires that have been around for 6-10 years. They almost always lose resilient, develop cracks and checks, etc. The same goes for the timing belt.
Will it fail next week or next month? Probably not, but the point is there is no easy way to know in advance and on many engines are of an "interference" design where you have expensive parts contacting at high speed if the cam and crankshaft get out of synch. I don't know what model you have, but if it has an interference engine and the belt breaks ... well, if you thought a belt replacement was expensive...
Matt
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Would heavy use of an A/C prematurely wear a belt or is that just silly thinking?
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It may put a bit more load on the serpentine belt or whatever belt drives the AC compressor, but should have no effect on the timing belt. That just drives the cam shaft.
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The Henchman wrote:

I don't know of any engine that uses the timing belt to drive accessories, but I'm sure some exist. Typically, the accessories are driven by a separate serpentine belt that is exposed, whereas the timing belt is typically behind a cover. So, in general, using the AC would have little affect on the timing belt.
Matt
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FYI, the timing belt on a VW Jetta also drives the oil pump and distributor so other engines may drive other items but I wouldn't think they would drive accessories.

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On Tue, 7 Apr 2009 16:48:02 -0700 (PDT), tonita wrote:

If you are a member of the AAA try going to their auto analysing specialist.
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I'm late to this thread but why tie rods wear out so early? Do you drive back roads or country/rural roads alot? Do you hit potholes or speedbumbs way too fast?
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I was asking myself the same question. I guess, even though the car has low mileage, it is 6 years old. I've only had the car just about a year and put 14,000 miles on it and I'm very careful, the only driver. I guess they just don't make think like they used to?? I've already had the work done and next are the back brakes which they tell me are almost worn down. I'll worry about the belts next month I guess and I hope that's it for a while.

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news:ff2542ca-4db6-4aa2-ad71- I've already had the work done and next are the back brakes which they tell me are almost worn down. I'll worry about the belts next month I guess and I hope that's it for a while.
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Brakes at 43,000 is not uncommon. Brakes depends on the type of driving you do. When I lived in Philadelphia, 20,000 miles was considered a lot of miles for me. Lots of traffic lights and stop signs. Now. 50,000+ is the norm as I can drive to work 24 miles and hit the brakes maybe six times if I catch the lights right. .
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