Timing Belt Replacement..2006 Elantra

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I checked the owner's manual for my 07 Elantra. The 60,000 mile timing belt note is an "inspection" note. The"replacement" note is for 90,000 miles.. Of
course, the local dealer will recommend the replacement instead of the inspection. I got caught on a similar note on coolant inspection/replacement.
Freddie
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wrote:

The 2011 Sonata doesn't require a timing belt change at 60,000 miles. It was one of the drawbacks I had written down when I went shopping for a new car.
I didn't buy one (yet) but I'm still considering one when we buy a new car this spring. The problem is, I live near Detroit and with family, friends and neighbors all out of work, there's too much guilt buying a foreign car. We may go with a Ford Escape instead.
That being said, I've owned 5 new cars. My 2004 Sonata was the only foreign car of the 5. And it's by far the best new car I've ever bought. It's going to be a tough decision to buy American, but I'm really hoping all their quality issues are behind them.
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?

AFAIK, they have chains now so no belt to worry about, and the cost associated with it. My V-6 has a shain and that was a factor for me also.

Your 2004 was a foreign car, but the 2011 is made in America by US workers from many US made parts. (my 2010 is 48% US) I read that in 2011 Hyundai will be more of a US company than GM. My US made GM car that is falling apart is why I switched to Hyundai. I have no guilt at all. GM made me a crappy Buick that I finally just gave away a few weeks ago.

I say "screw 'em" and buy what is best for me.
I'm on my second trouble free Sonata. There have been a couple of shows on TV that showed the comparable Kia plant and how the cars are made and the precision of the build. Efficient, accurate, and a good value. I've never had a Ford or GM car go as many miles with no repairs. Your money, your choice. Good luck.
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On Sat, 15 Jan 2011 15:51:38 -0500, "Ed Pawlowski"

Yes, I have to do what's best for my family. I have owned 5 brand new cars. All have been American companies except the Sonata. At 80k miles, the Sonata has been, by far, the best car. Less problems, smoother ride, more inexpensive and overall more reliable.
While it's true that the new Hyundai is built in the U.S., the profit from selling them still goes to Korea. Sure, it keeps some Americans working, but at much smaller wages than American car maker workers. I will probably end up with another Hyundai, as I like the style very much of a few of their models. I just hope the economy continues it's recent rebound so there's not as much guilt involved in buying one.
When I bought my 2004 (I actually got it in 2003) the economy was in decent shape. There wasn't as much guilt involved in not "buying American" My father-in-laws new Ford was assembled in Mexico, with many foreign parts in it. But like I said, the profits stay here in America.
It all comes down to quality and value for the money. And as of right now, it's hard to compare a Hyundai against an American car. They cost less, are more reliable and are a better value for the money. But American quality has come a long way to narrow the gap. But the cost is still higher, so that could be the deciding factor.
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Quote ""Sure, it keeps some Americans working, but at much smaller wages than American car maker workers.""
Everything I have read in the newspapers says otherwise. The reason that the unions can't get into these factories is because there is no incentive to vote for the union. No higher wages, but expensive union fees.
wrote

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you really know that, and perhaps more importantly how can you know it benefits you and other people that have to do real work for a living? It seems naive to believe given the nature of the Global Economy and the ruthless indifference of corporations for the welfare of workers. Numerous sources confirm that currently the top 1% of "Americans" own/control 80% of the wealth. Does it make you feel better to buy a car that is perhaps not as good and give your money to them? I'd really like to believe that buying "American" benefits all Americans, but this looks like a myth. At least the jobs that Americans have building Hyundais in America are real. And no offense to you and your family. I'm on your side.
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Brian Matthews wrote:

I understand your sentiment, but the question is what is best for your family in the long run as well as the short run. Saving money is good in the short term. Moving jobs and profits overseas and having chronic double-digit or higher unemployment may mean that your kids can't find a job when they grow up. Is that what is best for your family? Just sayin...
Matt
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?

So is it better to buy a GM car built in Mexico or Canada or Germany or a "foreign" car built in the US?
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Neither. It is better to buy a GM car built in the USA, especially, now that I am a part owner of GM being an American citizen. :-)
I have no intent to get into a protracted political discussion and my employer makes 60% or more of its money outside the USA now and that has been a very good thing during this recession. However, I think our short term optimization may be hurting us in the long term.
I don't claim to have the answers, but I think we all need to think a little more about this as we buy things made outside the USA to save a few bucks. What we save now may cost us or our kids and grandkids dearly in the years to come.
Just food for thought.
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I bought GM for many years, until they sold me crap. That lead me to Hyundai and much satisfaction.
I agree that we should buy US made when possible, but it is difficult. The computers we are using right now may be assembled locally, but the components are mostly Asian. TV, stereo, cameras, toasters, are pretty much 100% Pacific Rim. I bought a hydraulic pump a few weeks ago to replace one made in Germany. The replacement was made in India. It was for use on a machine made in Austria as there are none for our industry made in the US any more.
Event he Made in USA GM cars have a lot of imported parts. They have to.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I basically agree with you which is why I said I don't have any easy answers.
I have been fortunate in that the only crap car I have ever bought new was a 1984 Honda Accord. My GMs have all been quite good cars as have my Chryslers. I still own one GM and one Chrysler in addition to my Sonata. My Sonata has been a fine car, but has had as much trouble as have my American cars and has more design flaws than have any American car I owned in the last 20 years.
I have not owned a Ford since a 1977 Granada that my wife brought into the marriage so I can't speak to Fords, but read and hear good things about them and they earned my respect my not taking direct government bail-outs. I later learned that almost all auto makers got some form of assistance including Ford and Toyota so none are as clean as I once thought, but still Ford didn't sell out to the government as did GM and Chrysler.
I probably won't buy a Hyundai again, but only because the dealer I bought from went out of business last year and the new franchise owner is one of these mega-dealers that I don't like and has a spotty reputation. And, given that I test drove a Chevy Equinox against a Hyundai Santa Fe and found the Equinox substantially nicer and have decided on a small crossover as my next vehicle, I will give Chevy more business. Any my 1994 K1500 keeps soldiering on... :-)
I really wish the Hyundai dealership had remained with the "small town" dealer as the new Genesis looks pretty sweet. My next car will likely be in that class of vehicle.
Matt
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The intervals have started changing since the introduction of the 2005 Tucson. The 2006 Elantra is still 4 years/60k. Check the owner's manual for the model you'd be considering purchasing. Unless it's an Accent, it'll probably have chain anyway.
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