Waxing new car ... Questions

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I'm picking up my brand new car tonight (2006 Hyundai Elantra VE 5 Door in Midnight Blue) and I'd like to baby it a bit, so I'm hoping to give it a good waxing this weekend. I've got a few questions though. First
off, the brands that I have access to are Mothers, Meguiar's, Eagle One, Turtle Wax, Simoniz, DuPont, and NuFinish. I've looked around and other brands are pretty hard for me to get, so no point in recommending them ...
Now for the questions. Should I be using any sort of polish? I know Meguiar's has their three step process they recommend, Cleaner, Polish, Wax. However, don't polishes actually remove some of the existing clear coat (or paint if there's no clear coat)? If no polish, should I bother with a special cleaner? I'm worried about the cleaner being too harsh and also removing some of the existing finish on the car.
On a new car is it best just to wash it good with soap, dry, and then wax? Or should I be doing something extra?
Now onto recommendations ... I don't always have time to spend on the car, so the longer the wax lasts the better. Which leads me to believe that I'm probably better of with one of those synthetic ?polymer? finishes, not carnauba wax, since they are supposed to last longer. Correct?
I've read that Eagle One Gold Class is pretty good, but I can't find any comments about how long it lasts. Also I'm not sure if it's carnauba wax or polymer based. Btw, is the paste and liquid stuff both just as good?
I haven't been able to find too many other recommendations for polymer based stuff from the brands mentioned above. Unless I should be sticking with carnauba wax, in which case I've read that Mother's Pure Carnauba wax is good ... again does it matter whether it's the paste or liquid?
Thank you for taking the time to help out, Harry
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you shoudn't need to use a cleaner or cleaner wax on a new car. Just wash it well with dish soap and wax with the wax of your choice.
nate
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**Do NOT or ever use dish soap. That aside, you probably don't need to wax your new car just yet though I would wax it in Oct or Nov just before winter. Also, don't use Armor All inside.
Cloths are important also. Use the softest of soft 100% cotton cloths and also microfiber cloths are nice as they grab the residue (i.e., doing that post-wax wipedown) instead of pushing it around.
kaboomie
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Curious ... why no Armor All?
Thanks, Harry
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snipped-for-privacy@stonyx.com wrote:

Story I've heard is that it strips the plasticizers from the surfaces and replaces them with its own chemicals, and if you ever stop using it you'll end up with a hideous, cracked mess.
That said, I don't like it anyway - too shiny and attracts dirt. Personally I've had good luck with a wipedown with a mild Murphy's Oil Soap solution (seriously) and some Meguiar's vinyl and rubber protectant if you feel the need to use same.
You don't need to worry about this hopefully but my secret weapon for old, hard vinyl is hand cleaner with lanolin, rubbed into a toothbrush and left to sit, then buffed with a terry cloth towel. Seriously.
nate
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**Yes to the above and yes to too shiny. Bleah!

**I use a dampened cloth to swipe down surfaces, let it dry. If I find, say a drop or two of soda sticky, then I might use the dampened paper towel that I used to clean the windows to clean up that spot. Then I used a swiffer thingie that my brother in law gave me to try and it was awesome! Just a light brush against surfaces picked up all the dust and dirt and it does a good job getting in vents and stuff like that.
I just looked it up online, it's a Swiffer duster.
kaboomie
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Yep, swiffers for the bi-weekly dusting, plain warm water and a sponge for the mild cleaning and Mr. Clean magic eraser for the tough scuffs. No soaps!!! I have a 10-year old Caravan and the dash looks brand new still (and it is not garaged at home or at work either). Never had soap or anything else on it on it but plain water.
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kaboom wrote:

I agree in general, but what's the harm if you're going to wax immediately? It will clean more thoroughly than regular car wash.

agreed...
nate
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**It'll trash the paint. I've seen it firsthand as a lady who lived below me at one time, used Joy on her Miata. I've never seen a car that was a couple of years old with a paint job so darn bad on it. Completely dull (it looked like bare matte finish paint...really weird) and scratched to hell. I've only seen paint like that on cars that've been in junkyards. Car wash liquid is cheap and, at this point, he probably doesn't need anything 'gritty' to clean his car.
kaboomicus
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At least the dish soaps of the 1960's and 1970's sure did...it dulls the finish fairly quickly. I haven't used dish soap for 25 years...been afraid to.
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I was only suggesting it as a one time cleanup, not a regular practice. Haven't done it myself, although if I'm going to do bodywork on a car I use dish soap for the first wash to get all the wax off so it doesn't load up my sandpaper. Maybe a clay bar would be better for a new car then...?
nate
James C. Reeves wrote:

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**Afternoon, Nate :) I think a clay bar would be good. The clear coat is actually an extraordinarily thin layer, a detailer described it as: Imagine Saran Wrap stretched incredibly tightly over your thumb nail. I don't think cars of today can handle dish soap. Even though I don't think Harry needs to clay bar as of yet (he should've gotten the car already detailed), a clay bar is a great idea. I had forgotten about that, thanks Nate.
kaboomie
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Clay Bar is only to be used for cleaning dirt that's imbedded in the paint. It's very time consuming and not needed for a brand new vehicle
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Not necessarily. My new car (then Saturn) had what they call "Rail Dust" in the paint. The car had some sort of protective film (Cosmoline?) on it, but it wasn't enough. The dust kicked up by the train actually imbedded little metal particles that looked like rust spots in the paint. If left too long, they would have yellowed the paint around the imbedded particles (white car). Dealer had to clay and glaze the whole car. No doubt junk falls in the cars while on the truck car-haulers as well. This is noted in some of GM's SRs to the dealers as well.
B~
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Ummm.. waxing and washing are two differsnt things?
Brian
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'Ummm.. waxing and washing are two differsnt things? Brian'
Reply: Yes indeed. Washing is removing the loose dirt on a cars surface ; waxing is protecting the surface once its cleaned. Actually, to do it correctly, one should use a special Clay Bar after the washing and before the waxing ; a Clay Bar removes deeply engrained road grime and other fine debris and makes the surface extremely smooth .
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N8N wrote:

You want to tell that to my wife, who *formulates them*?
No; it doesn't clean more thoroughly and it isn't formulated to remove stuff like bug gutz, manure splatter, & asphalt/tar residue. Just buy the Kit Car Wash and leave the Dawn in the kitchen. -- C.R. Krieger (Who gets it free.)
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Regular household soap will remove all existing wax on your vehicle. I would use household soap only if you plan on waxing the vehicle afterwards. I use Nanowax on both of my cars. It works very good.
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Nate, you have quite a large collection of classic cars to still think that dish soap is a suitable car wash agent.
Dish soap has harsh detergents in it (to lift grease out of your way) that are way to harsh to use on your car if you want to have any sort of wax remain on the paint for more that six or eight car washes.
Use any brand of car wash soap, and use alot of it to lift the dirt away from the finish as you wash.
Bernard
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dish soap also strips away the natural oils of the paint finnish

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