What to do to a new Elantra?

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Matt Whiting wrote:


I know what you mean, but considering the damage I've seen other people do, I suspect that the natural tendency is: "If it don't feel tight, keep crankin' on it." ;-)

True.
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Mike Marlow wrote:

That is why a fair bit of margin is left with the tabular torque values. Lubrication does make a large difference, typically requiring a 25-50% reduction in torque applied depending on the lubricant type. However, a very light coat of oil on clean threads doesn't make a tremendous difference.
http://www.vfbolts.com/torque_value.htm
I much prefer the uniformity I get from keeping my lug studs and nuts rust free than the issues that arise with rusty parts that will have wild swings in the torque vs. tension relationship as Brian describes above.
Matt
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Matt Whiting wrote:

I keep mine rust-free by brushing off any rust, if necessary. Since the car comes with capped nuts, that's not even an issue. The chart you provide proves my point about lubrication.
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Brian Nystrom wrote:

Yes, as I said at the outset, I don't use any grease if I have capped style lug nuts. Only ones where the stud is exposed through the nut and not protected from road salt and water.
And brushing off rust doesn't return the surface to its original "clean and dry" condition. The pitting remains and will dramatically alter the tension that a given fastener torque will yield.
I never questioned your point about the affect of lubrication on the torque/tension relationship. I'm simply saying that fasteners maintained in "like new" condition by the use of grease to prevent rust is preferable to letting the fasteners rust and then brushing off the rust.
Matt
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A couple of more suggestions:
*Make sure you are "working" all the components of your car at least occasionally. A good example would be the electric windows, especially the rear ones which don't get a lot of work. The electrical motors definitely work better when used frequently.
*Keep your car clean. There is little more you can do to help it maintain its good look. With two-sided galvanized steel, clearcoat paint and more, the manufacturers have ramped up their ability to keep your car looking nice for years. But you still have to hold up your end.
*Be the same "fiend" concerning maintenance you always were with the older cars. With the older ones, you did it in hopes that you had "saved" it. You treat these new ones well from the very beginning (SO many don't), and they will treat you well. And I am quite sure that you understand that this means a WHOLE lot more than just oil changes.
Hope this helps.

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Rev. Tom Wenndt wrote:

This is especially true for the parking brake. They die from rust long before they will wear out. I use mine every time I park and I've never had a cable seize.
Matt
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Matt Whiting wrote:

That's interesting, as I rarely use mine and it's been fine, too. In a poll about this on the Elantra Club site, the results seemed to indicate that seized cables were actually more of a problem on cars where the E-brake was used frequently. Typical driving conditions weren't specified, so it's hard to draw any solid conclusions. However, it seems logical that all else being equal, an E-brake that's used more often will wear the cable seals faster and draw more moisture and foreign material into the cable. In dry environments, it's probably a non-issue, as moisture is the main problem. In damp areas, it could be a problem.
I'm not suggesting that people shouldn't use their E-brake when they need to, but unnecessary use may actually be detrimental to the life of the cables on the Elantra.
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Brian Nystrom wrote:

I haven't looked at an Elantra in particular so I can't comment on it specifically. However, almost all cars I've owned in the last 30 years had a place where the bare cable exits the cable sheath. This is often inside the rear brake, however, on many cars it is external to the brake and really exposed to road salt. If this cable is never moved, it will rust right up to where it enters the sheath seal. Then when you go to apply the brake, this rusted part is pulled into the seal which at the very least destroys the seal. Alternativley it refuses to enter the sheath rendering the brake ineffective or, worse yet, enters the sheath and binds inside causing the brake to refuse to fully release.
Even the cables that exit the sheath inside the backing plate are still exposed to moisture and brake dust which can cause them to bind. Using the brake regularly will move this cable and remove the surface rust before it can form a huge annulus that can't be knocked off. This is the same as brake rotors. Use then often, and the small amount of surface rust is removed each day keeping the rotors pristine. Let them sit unused for say 6 months (excluding SS rotors obviously) and see what they look like. And at that point the pits are so deep that the pads can't remove them and they will eat the pads in a hurry. Same principle applies to the brake cable and the sheath seal.
Matt
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I too have greased/oiled/lubed the lug nuts of all my cars since my 72' Mazda RX2 when I rotate or change tires. I hand tightened all of them, and never in these many years have I had a single one come even remotely loose (ish), much less be hard to take off. They're always nice and tight, but a good grunt loosens them and they spin off easily.
What I think is bad is having to -stand- on the tire bar or put an extension pipe on to loosen nuts that were put (back) on by the dealer/tire store. That happens all the time. Having to do that must put a horrific strain on the lugs themselves. Maybe that's how 'tight and dry' is supposed to work. I don't like it, scares me.
Never happens when I lube'em up. And the threads stay clean as a whistle.
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I never liked it when I heard lug nuts sing to me as I took them off either.
For the record (I know this is not relevant to the specific point of this post - I'm just using the platform for a while,,,), the primary reason that torque is speced and such a big deal made out of it on today's cars has nothing at all to do with the studs on most cars. It has everything to do with alloy wheels and cheap rotors. They warp.
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Mike Marlow wrote:

True, which is why you don't want the lugs to be overtightened, whether it's due to some idiot with an air impact gun or due to lubed threads. The result is the same either way, warped rotors. Perhaps it's just coincidence, but I've never had a warped rotor on any vehicle I've owned. I've always used a torque wrench and always kept the studs clean and dry.
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I've never warped one either but it sure is a common problem today. As more shops get away from torque sticks and use a real torque wrench, I expect we'll see fewer of those problems.
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Mike Marlow wrote:

Are shops actually getting away from air wrenches for wheel installation? I know of only one shop locally that consistently hand torques wheels and they even mention this in their advertisements. I drive 35 miles to get tires from this shop just for this reason. There is one local garage that does my inspections that will hand torque at my request, but I don't think they do so routinely. I know of no other garage that does this, although I haven't had my car back to the Hyundai dealer so I can't speak for them.
Matt
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Around here everything from Pep Boys to local shops uses torque wrenches these days. It's almost unheard of to impact on a set of lugs now. They run them on with an impact set to low torque and then torque them up with a hand wrench. You still see some torque sticks, but not so many.
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unkadunk wrote:

The issue is not one of the lugs staying tight; proper torque and tension will assure that.

No, that's not how it's supposed to work. That's the result of idiots who don't know what they're doing. I won't deal with a tire shop that doesn't use a torque wrench when installing wheels.
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Richard Dreyfuss wrote:

The front rotor do have a tendency to seize to the hubs, though considering the heat involved and the length of time they're likely to be on your car, it seems questionable whether applying anti-seize between them would make any difference. If you've got nothing better to do, it can't hurt.
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