whats with the Hyundai web site???

When I try and go to: http://www.hmaservice.com/webtech/default.asp
I get vectored off to : http://www.hmaservice.com/authenticator/login?returnAddress=http%3A%2F%2Fwww
.hmaservice.com%3A80%2Fwebtech%2Fdefault.asp
where they ask for a logon name/password. When I tried to open an account they said they would email me my user name and password but it never came. Now when I went back to the logon page I noticed that they are implying that I should be a dealer or a technician to access this website. Anybody know whats going on? I thought they had a pretty good web site, it would be a shame if it changes for the worse.
Dan
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I went through the same thing with the Hyundai website. The fix is to go the the site and click on the 'forgot password'. Then they e-mail you the password and your all set. The only thing I can't figure out is how to change the password to something I can remember. Good Luck!
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I definitely like your idea.
The info I have from Hyundai is that the site is still intended to be accessible to the public, but that they will be monitoring use.
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I definitely like your idea.
The info I have from Hyundai is that the site is still intended to be accessible to the public, but that they will be monitoring use.
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Its a fantastic website and I hope they keep it up. I noticed that KIA has very recently restricted their (very similar) website by incorporating a pay as you go system. My belief is that if you sell the car, service information should be available free of charge to keep it on the road. So far Hyundai has kept to that.
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Here's what I came up with for Kia that seems to require no info to view service info: http://www.kiatechinfo.com/default.aspx
I certainly hope Hyundai doesn't convert to a pay site. But since Hyundai owns Kia, I see the pay-as-you-go as a predictor of what may be down the road for Hyundai.
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Okay. Scratch the Kia website idea. I apparently came in through a back door I was able to open with a password from another site. Definitely sucks that it's not available for all for free.
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You're probably right, but I sure hope they think it through with a long range view rather that the short range. This is one of those things that customers love, whether they ever use it or not! It says, "We care about our vehicles, and we care about you, our customers."
In general, customers feel at the mercy of the auto industry. The vast majority dread taking their vehicles for servicing. Most of us have to take the word of someone we don't trust in the first place. Anything that allows a consumer to feel somewhat knowledgable, and thus a bit more in control of the situation, is good. Even if that feeling is not justified in fact!
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Joe Kaffe wrote:

I think that it's important to register our concerns with the company. There's a tendency for some companies to try to restrict all servicing to their own dealer network. Hyundai servicing is done more by the dealers than other companies' for the simple reason of the long warranty.
Also, as a Korean corporation that's come to the US relatively recently, there may be certain cultural differences that must be explained repeatedly in order for the parent executives to get the hang of satisfying us. I've seen other Korean firms that employed very strange practices when viewed through American eyes -- and seemed really bizarre to their own employees (Inkel Corporation gave their staff toothbrushes instead of bonuses one Christmas).
To me, having the shop manual on the web is a strong selling point for the brand, and they should be made aware of this. Like, "I want you to know that I'm so happy that you offer your shop manual freely to everyone on the web that when I buy my next car, it's going to be a Hyundai. I'm so used to going to your site for information that I can't consider buying my next car from a manufacturer who doesn't offer this valuable free service to their customers."
Now, to another matter: one major shortcoming with Hyundai is the lack of drive cycle information available to anyone. I've been able to get my hands on one set of gargantuan "all-purpose" drive cycles -- they are insane for use anywhere but on a controlled test track. And this was only available through an aftermarket source. Other car makers freely disseminate individual drive cycles, for specific years, specific models, and specific control systems.
Hyundai's huge single all-purpose multi-year pair of cycles impressed me as being so dangerous to carry out on public roads that I decided to withold the information rather than to post it here and have someone kill themselves trying to actually do them.
Drive cycles are used to set and test computer routines -- software built into your car -- that are called "monitors" or "readiness monitors." The completion of these routines are checked in smog testing; here in California, if a car hasn't completed enough of these monitors, the car will be failed in a smog test. In other words, keeping the consumer in the dark can be costly and a true hassle. Two of my monitors have not completed; it's been this way for months. Yet, additional monitors are shown complete -- monitors that should depend on the incomplete ones in order to be able to finish themselves! I'm sure in the dark. It doesn't make sense, but under the state law, the condition is actually legal.
For this reason,I feel that we need for Hyundai to get on the stick and to prepare and freely release drive cycles that conform to what's standard in the rest of the industry. It may take a lot of prodding...
Please forgive me if I decide to repost this part of the message as a new topic.
Richard
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To me, having the shop manual on the web is a strong selling point for

I tried the previous link but only came up with a training schedule. Where is this one? Thanks
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