XG350 hesitation

On cool morning here in AZ 45-55 degrees, I have hesitation when backed out of garage andthen put into forward. After that it runs fine. The garage is
probably 10 degrees hotter than outside. Brought in for first 6 mo oil change, left overnight and dealer says no problem found. Otherwise graet car! Any similar experiences. here? Thank you
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Seamus J. Wilson wrote:

What is the year and engine type of your car?
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2005 year and 6 cyl Seamus J.

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I don't see any reprograms addressing anything like this.
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Thank you for response. Seamus J.

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I have had the same problem with my 2002 XG350L since I bought it brand new. Hyundai has NEVER been able to fix it. Much worse when it is hot out. Feels like an old carbureted car with a bad choke or like it is running out of gas with no power and then - voom - it takes off from under you with unexpected acceleration.
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I have a 2004 XG350L with the same issue. It happens sporadically and at odd times. Dealer said they can't find a problem I see a trend here with many of you having the same problem. I don't know if it's outside temp related. I live in the Puget Sound Area in Washington State.

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I think several owners have experienced this bogging problem but have not thought to complain or had the patience to complain and/or bring suit. Hyundai has acknowledged on my service paperwork that there is a hesitation problem but has never been able to correct/fix it. Hyundai's techniocal service made suggestions like "let it warm up" or "that is normal" in an effort to get me to go away and not bother them.
If you are having this problem be tenacious in seeking a solution or getting reimbursed for the problem (lawsuit).
I am positive the problem lies in the drive-by-wire, the programming and the electronic transmission all working (or not) together. Within a set scenario (hot outside makes it worse, first started and driven) the bogging happens, not every single time but it does happen most often on the first start after a several hour park. This happened the very next day after purchasing the car and if I knew then what I know now the car would have been returned to the dealer as defective that day and I would have refused to accept it until it was permanently fixed. I assumed (my mistake) Hyundai would fix whatever was wrong with the car.
They have even had a TSB referrring to this problem. They have also has several related TSB's regarding the drive by wire programming issues.
Every other problem I had with my XG that Hyundai "blew off" I was eventually vindicated by a TSB being issued that spelled out almost to the letter my original complaint. I would print the TSB and go to the dealer and present it to them along with restaing my problem and that would finally fix that problem.
Being a former auto mechanic I guess I am more sensitive to car problems and refuse to accept excuses such as "that is normal". I KNOW what is normal with a car and what is not. I am not some complaining "crank" who just wants to be a pest.
On Sat, 7 Jan 2006 05:07:22 -0800, "Carl C. Jackson"

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I agree with the previous post 100%. I've had my 2002 XG350 into the dealer so many times for this problem that they have given up. It seems that either the Mass Airfow Sensor, or the Traction Control System, or even the Power Control Module is to blame. I get the impression that this is a design flaw that is not fixable. Hyundai denies that this problem even exists. Unless a large group of XG350 owners take on Hyundai with some sort of class action suit, this will never be resolved. There are not enough XG350's out there for Hyundai to spend the resources needed to solve the problem.
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The only thing to do is sue. I have had a lawsuit going (lemon law) for years now. Even if I lose I have been a thorn in Hyundais side regarding this Hyundai defect.
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kr wrote:

Yep, that's always a good solution. Makes the lawyers richer, you poorer and Hyundai could care less.
Matt
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And what would you suggest I do Matt?
After repeated attempts by Hyundai to fix my car I entered into discussion directly with Hyundai.
Hyundai asked what I wanted. I told them I wanted my car fixed. They said they would continue to try to fix it for as long as it took to do so. I asked how long was acceptable? Weeks? Months? Years? How many attempts? 3? 5? 10? 100? They would not make any promises. They refused to replace the car with another or return my money despite repeated repair attempts with no results and the problem still there.
After months of patience I contacted an attorney.
Tell me oh wise one what you would do so that I may gain from your immeasurable wisdom.
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kr wrote:

Well, having been involved with one lawsuit in my life (and it'll be my last), I can tell you that you will be better off trading the vehicle back to the dealer for one that you like better. Or trade for a different brand. Sure, you'll lose a little on the trade, but I'll bet you'll lose a lot less than what you'll spend on legal fees.
I sued, in small claims court, a repair shop who botched a ring and pinion swap on my 4x4. I sued them for about $1500. They came to court with a lawyer and I didn't (not supposed to need one in small claims court, right?). I still won a small judgement of $300, basically, what it cost to get it fixed correctly by a Chevy dealer, but I didn't get back anything that I'd paid the original shop (They quoted me $1000 for the job and then charged me $2000).
However, what happened next shows you how the legal system and lawyers work. The repair shop owner and his lawyer were livid that they lost against a lowly citizen. So, they went to the Chevy garage and talked to their mechanic. I'd written in my statement that in addition to making loads of noise and running very hot, the rear differential had a slight oil leak (which it did). When they asked the Chevy mechanic about the leak, he said he didn't remember seeing a leak and by then the vehicle had been repaired, including a new pinion seal, so there was no evidence of a leak. This was totally unrelated to the essence of the claim, but the lawyer went back to the small claims justice, said I'd lied in my statement, and convined the justive to file perjury charges against me! This is a fairly serious offense which can bring jail time. The lawyer knew full well I hadn't lied, but she also knew that I'd now HAVE to hire a lawyer to defend myself in county court against this charge. I ended up spending $3000 to get the perjury charge dismissed.
You do the math. Tell me who won...
Don't believe me though, forge ahead with your lawsuit, but let us know at the end what the final accounting is. :-)
In my opinion, the best thing to do in a case like this is what I did when Honda screwed me over on an Accord 22 years ago. Never buy another product from the company, and tell everyone you come across about your experience. If Honda had treated me right, I'd have purchased at least four more new Honda's in the intervening two decades. And I know that I've personally convince at least two other people to not buy a Honda. That has cost Honda more than any suit I could have filed and has cost me virtually nothing.
Matt
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I am suing under a lemon law. I setup the lawsuit with my attorney as follows: if I win I get my money back and Hyundai pays my lawyer fees and all court costs (my attorney felt I had a good enough case that he took it under these conditions). If I lose in court it costs me nothing, my attorney absorbs all his fees.
If I lose the case I will trade the vehicle in on a new car from a different manufacturer.
Mind you, I don't hate Hyundai. Any manufacturer can make a bad car (look at Mercedes). I just wanted them to own up to the defect and make good on it which they refused to do even after the defect was proved to them.
I have since found out Hyundai and Honda both fight tooth and nail in court to NEVER give back money on defective cars. Toyota and a few other manufacturers work with you to resolve the case before it ever reaches court.
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kr wrote:

Well, I never tried to sue Honda, but I had a lemon 84 Accord that they certainly wouldn't stand behind. That was my first and last Honda. There are simply too many options available nowadays to buy from any company that won't stand behind their products. Personally, I think not buying their products is far more effective then suing them, but YMMV. I'll be really surprised if your lawyer keeps this case on the basis you describe above after several weeks of time and several appeals.
Good luck!
Matt
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