Yet More Questions for Mr. Hyundaitech

Sorry if you're the most popular guy on this site, but you are knowledgeable, and your answers show both experience and wisdom. I appreciate that.
I am about to buy (yet) another car, this time for my daughter. I can see that I immediately need to get busy with a cooling system flush and a transmission flush. It is a '98 with 136,000 miles on it. While it is not a Hyundai, my questions involve generic maintenance.
A few questions:
*The car has anti-lock brakes. I would never bother with a brake fluid change on a car that doesn't have them, but might it be worth it if it does?
*Can a "home flush" with the Prestone flushing tee and more even begin to accomplish what I need for a cooling system flush or should it be done professionally (the coolant looks very old)?
*Elsewhere (can't find the posts) you talked about how your worst issues with oil have to do with oil not being able to get where it needs to go because of clogged passages. How do I find out how this is working, and is there anything I can do that might help, per the chance that the oil was not changed properly?
By and large, the car runs very well and smoothly, which is why I am considering it.
Any thoughts?
Tom Wenndt
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As far as changing the brake fluid, I'm not a big believer in that, but it's possible it'll do some good, and as long as you don't get air in the system, can't do any harm. I usually find the simplest way to do this is to open the bleeders and flip a brake fluid container upside down on the master cylinder.
A home flush with a tee will likely be quite effective. There's not much that's special about a "professional" flush.
I usually check for sludge by removing the oil cap and looking into the engine as well as looking for a dark brown or black solid or semisolid coating on the dipstick. Any of these are signs that you may have sludge accumulation in the engine. If you can see inside and everything looks clean, expect no oiling issues.
So I'm curious, what kind of car is it? 136k is scarier on some cars than others.
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hyundaitech wrote:

What kind of brake fluid does Hyundai use? DOT 3, 4, 5? If they don't use silicone based fluid, then periodic changes are well advised as the alcohol based fluids are hygroscopic.
Matt
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how does moisture enter closed system?

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Darby OGill wrote:

I'm not sure, but it does. Brake fluid turns dark as it absorbs moisture and it will turn dark over time.
Matt
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The biggest issue with old brake fluid is not only moisture, but the aluminum master cylinders some makes are using. Micro-grit and aluminum dust from normal wear can accelerate master cylinder wear. A fluid change at 5 years or 100K is prudent.
--
Bob

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Don't quote me on this, but I believe reading once that condensation from temperature changes causes nearly all of the moisture in the brake fluid.
Eric
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Sorry, that was a bad editing chop I did on that one. I was actually replying to Matt and Darby, not Bob.
Eric
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Eric G. wrote:

But condensation doesn't create moisture, it only changes the state of moisture that already exists. Completely dry air or other gas can be cooled to absolute zero and not have water condense out of it.
Matt
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Yes, you are right. I thought I read that somewhere though, but I can't find the source.
So how else could moisture get in the system? Could it be just from opening the cap once in a while to check the level/add fluid?
Eric
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Eric G. wrote:

That certainly is the most obvious way, but moisture enters systems that aren't opened. My Kawasaki Voyager had hyrdraulic brakes and clutch. The master cylinders had the covers held on with screws and had a sight glass to check the level. I never removed the covers between fluid changes, but within two years the fluid would turn from its nearly clear state when fresh from the can to dark brown.
The article I posted said that moisture (or maybe just oxygen) can enter the system through the rubber brake lines. I know that oxygen can permeate through things you would never imagine and cause oxidation.
Matt
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Darby OGill wrote:

http://www.bobbyarchermotorsports.com/pdf_2848_2.pdf
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Matt Whiting wrote:

Interesting article.
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Unless they've changed, Hyundai uses DOT 3.
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"Hyundaitech" said: "So I'm curious, what kind of car is it? 136k is scarier on some cars than others."......
I guess I'm supposed to say "April Fools." I just couldn't make myself buy a car that needed that kind of maintenance that soon.
I ended up buying a '95 Geo Prizm with 84000 miles on it. The 1.6L engine does require a timing belt, and I have a hunch it has never been changed, but the tires, fluids, seats and more look good (though not SO much so that you would expect a massive reconditioning job).
I can tell I will have to change oil immediately, and check other things soon (brakes, etc.), but is easily the best I've found, especially for the [very little] money.
Thanks again!
Tom Wenndt
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Can you help me? I have a 2000 Hyundai Elantra - apparently there is a problem with the transmission...I was told that it is an incorrect gear ratio for the 4th gear (whatever that means)...Being as I do not have any documentation concerning the 30,000 mi transmission service, the Hyundai serviceperson told me that it probably won't be covered under warranty. My car only has 57,000 mi on it also....I am the orig. owner...What exactly is entailed in that 30,000 mi service that I would have missed out on? Is there anything I can do now? Is this a big job to fix? Thank you....
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Check your owner's manual Cleopatra. At some point Hyundai changed the service interval for the automatic transmission fluid and filter from 30k miles to 105k miles. The point they're making is that if you didn't change the fluid as required, they're considering you at fault for the transmission failure. I don't recall when the interval change occurred, so it's definitely worth your while to check your owner's manual.
Also check your fluid and examine its condition. If you're not qualified to do this, have someone qualified do it for you. If you have the proper fluid in the transmission and it's in good condition, that'll bolster a case on your part that the transmission didn't fail because of your neglect.
Call the Hyundai customer assistance number. It'll open a case which will probably be referred back to the same dealer, but it'll put your case somewhere where the Hyundai factory rep will be able to see it if the dealer didn't already contact him/her.
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Thank you very much for your quick response. I'll follow through as you suggest. :)
hyundaitech wrote:

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Dear Mr. Hyundaitech: Well, you are a genius!! :) I called the customer assistance number as you suggested. Apparently, the 30k service is just an "inspection", nothing more and that the fluid doesn't even have to be changed technically until 105k miles....She called the dealership while I was on the phone, and suddenly the work is being done on my car as I am writing to you!!! Imagine that? How did I find this website? I have no idea, but thank you thank you thank you....
hyundaitech wrote:

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