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Huw wrote:


Nope. Toyota, Mazda, Nissan do not produce a mini truck like that. The truck is simply too light irregardless of any running gear. Highest on the list is Toyotas Tacoma with a 1480lb payload capacity. That is 200 or so lbs higher than the ratings on Mazda or Nissan. Don't get me wrong, they are great trucks. I've owned several. But they aren't made for 2,000lb payloads nor towing more than about 5,000lbs (with V6).
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trucks
carry
Are you serious? I suspect you are mearly a Troll.
The

on
LOL! Of course they do make trucks like that. The USA is only a small fraction of the World and I have given you sufficient information to find the trucks on line. It is unfortunate that my news server dumps posts with internet links otherwise I could take you straight there. But it ain't rocket science to find out what is available. As for these trucks being too light, what are you on? The Isuzu TF has an unladen weight of 1675kgs and a gross weight of 2750kgs which gives a payload of 1075kgs for the 4wd version. I can assure you that it has a goddamn awful stiff ride unladen and a nicely controlled ride fully laden. The 2wd version has the same payload. These are work trucks and are expected to work with a load on board and are built to withstand overloading to a large extent. They are used thus in many parts of the World including the middle and far East and Asia where they are the primary workhorses in many extremely demanding conditions. Open your eyes man and don't make a fool of yourself.
Huw
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You are all missing the point here. In the US we have liability and can and will be sued much easier than over in UK. I remember being over in England about 10 years ago and seeing small wagons towing large trailers. I made sure I stayed out of their way as they were an accident just waiting to happen

and
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Zex0s wrote:

Thats my thinking as well. I can't imaging towing heavy loads with vehicles simply not designed for such loads. They must not have big hills there as well!! No way could a trooper pull 9,000lbs up a steep mountain grade.
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load-balancing
same
Diesel, that

you're
likely
pulled
steep
I live in a particularly undulating [though not hilly as in 'high altitude] part of Wales which is noted for steep hills. My Trooper can certainly handle that load with confidence although it is often the case that it has to start in low ratio. It is of course, diesel, as are all my vehicles including the X5. My Trooper is only plated for just 3 tons though later versions are up to 3.5 tons. High vertical tow ball weights mean that the rubber bump stops above the back axle are frequent casualties. 3 tons is about the average laden trailer load that this workhorse tows although it has towed some 5 tons over a ten mile route once and very slowly
Huw
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Huw wrote:

Thats just not true at all. I have no idea where you get your info but it's just wrong. Large RV trailers are widespread. 25' to 35' trailers and fifthwheels are everywhere in the USA. Trailerparks and campgrounds are filled with 10,000lb to 16,000lb+ trailers. 3/4 and 1 ton trucks sell like crazy here. You are correct that most towing is for leisure but it is a HUGE business. Far exceeds anything in the UK. For work purposes companies use larger trucks. They don't buy personal vehicles for such work.

Same in the USA. Ranchers, farmers, construction contractors etc all have trailers here. If they do not need a large truck then they'll at least have a 3/4 or 1 ton. Those individuals do not use Troopers and other 1/2 ton personal vehicles for such use. They buy a vehicle designed for handling heavy loads and towing.
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and
specced
but
trailers
campgrounds
trucks
leisure
work
vehicles
Exactly. Towing behind the family SUV which is a group of vehicles generally weighing between 1.8 and 2.8 tons is not that common. Large trucks, not in the Trooper class are used for towing recreational trailers.

vehicles
Almost
all
at
and
This is what I am saying. However, it is only in your contention that Trooper sized vehicle are not built for towing, that we disagree. I have demonstrated that they are [built for towing] and certainly do very commonly but not in the US [as demonstrated by your gas engine and lack of standard fit tranny cooler]. It seems we agree except that you cannot imagine a territory where the use is different and the expectations higher of these vehicles.
Huw
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Huw wrote:

People tow with troopers here. But not heavy loads. Typically they will tow less than 3 tons (6,000lbs). That is a small trailer in the USA. Anything over that is way overloaded and unsafe. I have seen people here tow 30's RV's with Ford Explorers. Idiots is all I can say. I pass the mangled remains of their flipped over vehicles at the bottom of long grades all the time.
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