Honda key blanks....

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Where can I obtain a key blank (with the black rubber handle -- don't know the technical name) for my 1995 Honda Passport. Some site online wants like
$80.00 to do an original key. Yeah, right!!!
Aaron
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ajpdla wrote:

at almost any local hardware store. Will cost around USD 5,- Kind regards, Erik-Jan.
--

http://www.fotograaf.com/trooper

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http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&itemy4075081 1&category@016&sspagename=WDVW

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Those expensive keys are called "transponder" keys. Some key shops can provide them, and $80 sounds a little high but maybe not, and can cut the key itself so you can open the door with it. But the car has to be programmed to accept the key as a valid electronic key when you use it to start the car. Don't know about late model Hondas, but with our 2002 Toyota (Prius) the procedure involves a dance that is guaranteed to make you feel foolish and to make bystanders point and stare: http://www.coastaletech.com/keys.htm . The Honda may require programming at the dealer - I dunno. It's the price of security against car thieves, at least the ones who don't use tow trucks.
BTW - don't ever lose the last programmed key, so you don't have any. My understanding is that requires replacement of the security module, for many hundreds of dollars.
Mike
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Michael Pardee wrote:

You gotta be kidding. That's pretty ridiculous, all right.
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Abeness wrote:

All that's missing is the "May I?" question.
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news:KfqdnfuwD8M1213cRVn-
<snip>
| Those expensive keys are called "transponder" keys. Some key shops can | provide them, and $80 sounds a little high but maybe not, and can cut the | key itself so you can open the door with it. But the car has to be | programmed to accept the key as a valid electronic key when you use it to | start the car. Don't know about late model Hondas, but with our 2002 Toyota | (Prius) the procedure involves a dance that is guaranteed to make you feel | foolish and to make bystanders point and stare: | http://www.coastaletech.com/keys.htm . The Honda may require programming at | the dealer - I dunno. It's the price of security against car thieves, at | least the ones who don't use tow trucks. | | BTW - don't ever lose the last programmed key, so you don't have any. My | understanding is that requires replacement of the security module, for many | hundreds of dollars. | | Mike
Nice 'feature'.
| |
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That's pretty much how the Hondas handle programming the system for new remote transmitters, but the keys are encoded by a special machine. Dealers have the machine; all it takes is one of your original keys. They can cut another one and have the transponder code transferred into the new key, no problem.
With the Honda system, there's no issue of "too many keys for the system to keep track of". You can make as many keys as you like, since they're all duplicates, right down to the transponder encoding.
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wrote:

Ah, so it is actually the key that is programmed. I like that idea better.
Mike
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Yes.
But the tradeoff is that you *must* pay someone to use the transponder duplicator to make your key a good one for the ignition. That jumps the price of the key to include the labor.
But I'll take that over paying a bunch for an encoded key that I have to teach my car to listen to. Under that scenario, the car has a limit to how many keys it can work with. I think that's bad. I'll pay for the extra keys to have the privilege of unlimited copies.
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Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

I believe you can also get a new programmed key with the VIN from Honda.
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I've not heard that. I doubt it; for example, they can't give you the radio security code with just the VIN. That requires the radio serial number.
I do believe that there may be some sort of serial number on the computer module that may be of use in getting another key blank. I do know that you can also replace the computer module, at great expense, and that will start you fresh with new keys and code. If you've had your keys stolen along with some sort of identifying papers, such that the thief could get to your van, people have replaced the computer module so that the stolen keys don't work.
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Your selling dealer keeps the radio code. It is associated with the VIN in case service has to be done, or so you can get it from them if you need it, and of course can't locate where you put it.
I have no idea if the same is true for the keys.
My new Ford Escape came with no radio key fobs. They magically made the ones they took from some other Ford Escape work for my car.
--
Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5


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wrote:

MINE does--actually, the dealership doesn't, my salesman does. In a 3x5 file card box. Handwritten. That's just something he does for HIS customers.
But I sincerely doubt that many dealerships, as policy, do this for their customers.
Therefore, when you need the radio code and you've lost it, and you don't deal with the possible handful of dealership that do this, you're stuck with finding the code via the radio serial number.
If you're lucky, you (or the original owner) stuck the radio serial number sticker in the glovebox or something, so you don't have to pull the radio to get it.
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Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

The VIN is the serial number for the car, which should give them the correct information. I replaced a key for my Cherokee at the Chrysler dealer in this way. They have the transponder codes on file and can be programmed at the dealer without another key based on the VIN. I would have to think that if Chrysler can do it, Honda should also have similar capabilities.
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Erik-Jan Geniets wrote:

Sorry. Kind regards, Erik-Jan.

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At a Honda Dealership.
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got one done 2 months ago at a Halifax Nova Scotia dealership.I got the key from e-bay for 15.00 and Honda programmed it for 14.00 taxes in.

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That was a good deal.
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On 12/15/04 9:45 AM, in article f_Yvd.80303$6f6.19720@edtnps89, "slider"

'95s that have the special expensive keys. That came a few years later.
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