Trooper 3.1TD Engine Heater

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This question has intrigued me so I decided to RTFM (in this case, the workshop manual).
It seems that the switch is for a ceramic heater which supplements the car heater when it is cold. It does not heat the engine in any way. There are also some conditions that have to be in place for this heater to work. Not all of these are in the driver's handbook. I quote from the manual (n.b. this is for a 1999 3.0 litre Diesel Trooper):
Ceramic Heater
When the fan control knob (fan switch) turns on with the temperature control knob set to "FULL HOT" (full hot switch "ON), the ceramic heater in the heater unit gets hot, thus causing the heater blow temperature of diesel vehicle to get high to improve the heating performance (since the engine coolant temperature of diesel vehicle is low, it's blow temperature is also low).
There is then a diagram which shows that:
Glow plug must be off Heat switch must be set to full on Fan switch must be on Engine coolant must be below 80C Engine heater switch set to on
and then the ceramic heater will operated.
I must admit that I was not aware of the heater's true purpose. I understood that it was sensitive to the temperature of the engine coolant but was blissfully unaware of the other conditions that must be met. I have therefore probably never felt the benefit of the heater. I am now looking forward to some cold weather to try it our properly.
--
Howard Neil



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Heh heh . . . . so the "Quick warm up" is referring to people, not the engine.

I MUST try that. I bet its never been on before .........

Yes - and so am I. You live and learn ..............
Cheers Andrew Kay
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The engine heater [that thing that blocks the exhaust] certainly does NOT need to be on for the interior ceramic heater to work on mine. I always thought that the instructions for this in the operators manual was reasonably clear. It also actuates the engine 'idle-up' device when it operates so it should be quite obvious when it starts heating.
Huw
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As far as I can tell there is no exhaust blocking system in the 3.0 diesel. If there is, how is it switched? The only switch called (wrongly) an engine heater only controls the ceramic heater (as per the Isuzu workshop manual).
--
Howard Neil



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There may well not be. Mine is a 3.1. Have you actually had a look underneath?

The ceramic [electric fire] cabin heater is only controlled by the standard ventilation heater dial. If you mean the rocker switch with a green light and picture of engine with lightening flash, then this works the engine heating and/or exhaust restricting valve, not the cabin electric fire which, as you know is isolated if engine coolant temperature exceeds a set amount. In fact both separate systems are controlled in this way.
Huw
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Its a button with a line drawing of an engine with a graphic of a heater element inside it (sort of spiral - a bit like the circuit symbol for an inductor). Confusing, ain't it?
Cheers Andrew
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Yes, you are right about the picture. I have just replied to Huw assuming the picture on the button was the same as described by him.
Sorry about the confusion, Huw, Andrew is right and the switch may, indeed, be different to the one you have.
--
Howard Neil



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Yes the picture is as you describe [I haven't looked at mine in months] but its function in a 3.1 is as I describe it.
Huw
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I have checked the workshop manual again and the push switch with the green light and picture of engine with lightening flash is referred to as the "full hot switch" throughout. It is clearly shown as connecting to the ceramic heater. There is no reference, that I can find, of an engine heater of any description.
In an earlier post, I quoted the workshop manual as "When the fan control knob (fan switch) turns on with the temperature control knob set to "FULL HOT" (full hot switch "ON), ". The full hot switch reference in brackets refers to this push switch.
There are no other switches (that I can find) that could relate to an engine heater. I can only assume that Isuzu have changed the function of the push switch but never thought of changing the picture on the front. Perhaps it was a late design change, hence the pretty useless words in the drivers manual.
--
Howard Neil






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REPLY.co.uk (Howard Neil) wrote:

Yup, reading this lot, that's what I'm beginning to think.
Paul C.
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TO

Could be. However, the proof of the pudding is if you just hop over to the car and, with a cold engine, make sure the switch is in the off position, then start the engine with ventilation heater in cold and blower 'on' in second speed condition. Then just turn the cabin temperature dial up towards maximum 'hot' i.e. to the end of the red zone. As you reach the last eighth of the dial the engine idle speed should increase and heat should be generated at the vent outlets within a minute or so. Try it and see.
Try it again later with a cold engine and the switch with engine picture 'on'.
Huw
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The heater fan doesn't have a "second speed". It has "Off", "Automatic" or continously variable.

I've just been out in the Trooper - it's first start of the day.
I tried the fan switch on "Auto" and also on maximum; the "Quick warm up" switch on & also off; the heater control at 22degC and also at the top. For the first minute or two, it wasn't obvious that any of these had an effect (apart from setting the fan switch on max blows lots of cold air).
After maybe a mile or so, the coolant temp must have been high enough to generate some heat anyway (though it could have been the ceramic heater - who knows) and there was warm air with the temp control at max, with the "Quick warm up" switch either on or off.
I've no evidence so far that the "Quick warm up switch" does anything at all. Maybe we need some really cold weather, so it'll take longer for the engine to start to warm up & the switch's effect may be more obvious.
Cheers Andrew Kay
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message

I suspect you are twiddling too many gnobs too quickly.

A cold morning would probably suffice at this time of year. Don't bother with the switch with the engine on it until you have a clear idea of whether the cabin electric fire works without it. If heat is evident at the vents [with heat dial on hot] within a mile or a mile and a half, then it will be the electric heater. The same type of thing, though not necessarily an electric fire, is fitted to many direct injection diesels because they take up to five miles to heat the water in the cooling system to provide cabin heat. Most manufacturers just do not mention it any more.
Huw
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My '99 Monterey diesel also has the fan blower dial divided into 5 speeds.
--
madiba

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wrote:

It was first reg on 1/1/2000 and is a LWB Citation with 3.0D engine
Cheers Andrew
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message wrote:

It sounds as if it has climate control rather than plain air-con.
Huw
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Because it is wrong

No. Apart from heavy soot emission.
Huw
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On Sat, 8 Nov 2003 12:27:50 -0000, "Ploggo"

actually they're called a "Jacobs Compression Brake" aka a "Jake Brake" and they're capable of upwards of 1000 redarding HP, depending on the engine. in the US I'd say it's more like 75% of medium duty trucks and 100% of heavy duty trucks have them.
-Bret

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Aint goin to argue about name please explain "and they are capable etc etc Ploggo

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On Sat, 8 Nov 2003 17:31:01 -0000, "Ploggo"

Retarding HP is a measure of a diesel engine's ability to absorb energy and to slow the truck.... For light duty and lighter medium duty trucks it's done by using an exhaust brake... i.e. one that closes a valve in the exhaust.. this system is limited by the amount of backpressure the engine can handle w/o stalling. these make a hissing sound when actuated. usually the max you can get out of them is around 150 retarding HP. Heavier medium duty and heavy trucks use an "engine retarder" or "compression release brake" which opens the exhaust valve a few degrees before TDC and dumps off enough cylinder pressure so the cylinder won't fire giving a two fold benefit.... energy absorbtion on compression and no power stroke. the bled off pressure is what gives the compression release brake it's distinctive stacatto sound. On common (in the US anyways) engines like the Cat C12 and C14, Cummins N14 and 50 series detroit engines braking figures of between 350-and 450 HP are common. jake brakes on huge offroad diesels (like in CAT 7- series haul trucks) can absorb 1000HP plus.
for more info check out www.jakebrake.com
-Bret
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