190e 2.6 unconnected vacuum pipe

Hi,
I have a 1989 190e 2.6 auto. Today I noticed a thin pipe (black with 2 red stripes) coming from above the transmission housing that ends in a rubber connector that looks like it should be connected to something
but it isn't.
I'm guessing it's a vacuum pipe of some sort (for the vacuum modulator?) as there is another of the same size (this time all black) that comes from a similar direction and connects with a similar rubber connector to the inlet manifold, number 6 port.
The car has recently had an oil change so I guess it must have been dislodged when this was done. Both pipes pass very near the filer.
Anyone got any suggestions where it should be connected? I can't find anything obvious. Even better, anyone with the same model who can have a look at theirs and report back?
Many thanks, Chris
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If the vacuum line to the trans is disconnected you should experience extremely hard shifts. It is common that the vaccum line gets pulled off during a ham fisted filter change. Mine has a small rubber elbow that connects this line to the vaccum port behind the oil filter. Peter

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Peter,
Thanks for that.
The line that's disconnected doesn't appear to be that one: I have tried disconnecting the other black pipe (which is currently connected) to see what happens and I do indeed get very hard shifts, so I put it back on!
I couldn't find anything behind the oil filter that it could connect to. Do you mean it connects onto the manifold?
Anyway, I'll have another look in the daylight.
Thanks, Chris
On Thu, 2 Dec 2004 01:57:14 -0800, "Peter W Peternouschek"

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On my old '82 123, the black pipe is a vent line that goes through the firewall into the cabin. That way, when the system releases vacuum, it intakes clean air into the system. The cabin air is clean.
Larry In the back yard, under the oak.
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Unless my buddy Bryan is there smoking massive bong hits...
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Damn! I hadn't thought about that! Maybe that's why this thing is down on power.
Larry In the back yard, under the oak.
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Thanks for the help, I have managed to find out where the pipe should be connected :-)
The black one is connected to the Vacuum Modulator, a red disc shaped object of left-hand side of the transmission. OK there.
The black pipe with red stripes should have been connected to another pipe that runs across the firewall within the engine compartment and then through it to join to the main vacuum system where a feed from the manifold splits into loads of branches for the ventilation control, etc. (near the master cylinder).
It seems to be connected with a solenoid so presumably a vacuum isn't always present.
It travels down the right-hand side of the transmission and joins onto a white cylindrical object on the transmission, the same thing that a cable from the throttle assembly connects to.
Out of curiosity, does anybody have any idea what the white object does and why it would need a vacuum? I guess it's how the transmission knows the trottle position but why the vacuum? Having the vacuum disconnected didn't seem to have any affect.
Thanks, Chris
On Wed, 01 Dec 2004 22:22:45 +0000, Chris_Orange

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Could be a checkvalve.
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