'83 MB Interior "wood" trim

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The plastic "wood" trim on my "83 MB 300SD is coming loose in virtually all the locations ( dash, doors, etc.) I have tried several types of glue with
poor results. The plastic has become deformed and is no longer "c" shaped ( it is more of lazy '3' shape as seen from the side) and difficult to get back on the metal underneath. Anyone have any suggestions for how to do this better or more effectively? Can you heat the plastic to warp it back into shape ? Any good suggestions for a glue that will hold plastic to metal? Thanks , wolf
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superglue worked for me

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I used GE Silicone II clear chaulk... it is also an adhesive... excellent.
I also used tape to hold the wood in position while the glue is curing... this is the pain in the butt thing.
However, I suggest you try the Loctite Quiktite superglue... you can get it at any Home Depot. Excellent glue that will glue anything.
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Thank you both ...Off to the hardware store... wolf
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The short L-shaped piece of wood trim to the left of the steering column in my '85 300D came off, and I replaced it securely using standard contact cement. This is a thick, yellowish, snot-like substance that you apply to both pieces with an acid brush and allow to dry separately before pressing the pieces together. It comes in small cans, is reasonably inexpensive, and is avail- able at any hardware store.
Caveat: When using this stuff, it's a great idea to practice pressing the pieces together "dry" a few times to get the feel of them before you do it for keeps with the glue on. Since the glue will no longer be wet when you fit the pieces together, once they touch, that's the way they'll be staying.
Geoff
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Contact cement are not strong enough... I'd go GE Silicone chaulk anytime over contact cement... Loctite Quicktite is phenomenal... I tried gluing rubber to plastic with all different kind of glues including contact cement... nothing worked except Quiktite.
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JB Weld Quick works. You'll never, ever, get it off again though.
And the wood really is wood. It just looks like plastic because it's finished with an epoxy resin.
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Hi folks,
Thanks for the responses. When the contact cement gives up the ghost, I'll probably give JB a go.
Tim Delaney
snipped-for-privacy@vrx.news (Richard Sexton) wrote in message wrote:

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I've got a similar problem. I tried using contact cement - brushed on a couple of panels that had fallen or broken off and injected it with a syringe under areas which had lifted. Unfortunately, the contact cement doesn't stick completely to the aluminum. The panels are on, but I wouldn't want someone to pick at the corners...
Tim Delaney 84 300SD 207,000 km

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I suspect that it would if applied properly. The problem, I'd wager, was that you injected it the way you did. As I explained in a previous post, contact cement is intended to be applied to both pieces separately and allowed to dry before the pieces are fitted together. (It doesn't "dry" in the usual sense, but solidifies and becomes sticky.) Injecting it underneath some- thing that's still more or less in place won't allow it to cure the way it needs to.
Geoff "W123 u"ber alles" Miller '85 300D, 231K mi. '82 300CD, 263K mi.
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Hi Geoff,
On the pieces that had fallen off (or were broken off), I painted the wood and the aluminum with contact cement, let it set until it was almost dry and then joined the surfaces together. On the pieces where I had to inject the cement, I gently squeezed the wood against the aluminum to spread the cement, waited about ten minutes, then bonded them together. The problem I noticed was that the glue tended to lift off the aluminum when I touched it (to see if it was dry). Perhaps there was some wax/ArmorAll residue on the panel (I don't know what the previous owner may have done and I didn't wipe it down with alcohol... not much forethought on my part).
Cheers,
Tim
snipped-for-privacy@u1.netgate.net (Geoff Miller) wrote in message writes:

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I create and repair MB wood trims and it has been my experience that Gorilla Glue works best. It sets in about 15 minutes and is sold within 2 to 3 hours. Just be careful not to apply too much and to clamp the wood in place.
This glue expands and can get away from you quickly. As for strapping the wood in its desired place, you can use zip strips or even thin strips of duct tape. Even if the Zip Strip adheres to the wood, it can easily be removed.
Good Luck!
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to 3 hours. Just be careful not to apply too much and to clamp the wood in place.

duct tape. Even if the Zip Strip adheres to the wood, it can easily be removed.

it? wolf
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Why would a wolf want a gorilla? hehehehe
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Dunno, but I remember reading that somebody was shooting gorillas with tranquilizer darts several years ago and dressing them up in clown suits while they were unconscious. The story generated the predictable outcry from animal lovers, but I thought it was hilarious.
Geoff
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http://www.gorillaglue.com /
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On Tue, 25 May 2004 06:48:11 GMT, "Wolfgang Bley" wrote:

I don't know if it's a good suggestion or not Wolf, but when you stick the panels back on again why not use a combination of adhesive. A thin strip of double sided carpet laying tape down the middle with a strong epoxy resin lightly applied above and below the tape strip.
The tape will hold the trim in the correct position until the epoxy resin has cured properly. Et voila, all the rigidity of contact adhesive without the pant wetting fear of the one touch and it's cured that you get with contact adhesive.
300 Essie
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On another "line" in this thread Richard Sexton pointed out that the wood trim is in fact WOOD.. On further inspection of my center console he is 100% correct. So on to the next question. Can you refinish the wood? What did they use that cracks and warps so badly to begin with? Anyone of you ever try refinishing any of these wood trim parts? Thanks wolf
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It's a two part polyester resin. It strips off like any other finish and can indeed be refinished witht the same stuff.
I can't say I'm a great fan of the plasticy looking wood, I prefer the older finish you see on 108's and 111s. I've often tought about redoing a 126 with a different finish.
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wood. Refinishing a veneer is much more difficult IMHO than stripping solid wood. Veneer is not very forgigiving on many aspects or prep and finishing. wolf.
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