A good oil for 1985 300D?

Greetings, I just purchased a 1985 300D with approx. 215K miles on it. I sent it in for a prepurchase inspection and was told the oil is low and very
dirty. I am going to have the oil and filter changed and am curious what oil I should use. It has been 8 years since I have had to deal with a car and I can't remember much of anything usefull. Can anyone recommend a good oil for this car?
Also, I would prefer changing the oil myself. Is this something that will require special tools or skills? I used to change oil in my 1970 VW Bus simply by draining the oil from the bottom and filling it up from the top? Is it still that simple for this car? I believe I also replaced a gasket at that time as well.
Thanks for any suggestions about this topic.
t cable
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Changing oil is still the same deal as back then. You have to remember... diesel engine oil will turn black the moment you drive it around a block... from clean honey oil look into pitch black dirty scum looking oil instantly. It is normal for diesel.
The only thing when you change oil in diesel is... wear a glove... disposable glove when you do it... because once you get oil on your skin... it is not coming off for a while... no matter how hard you scrub.
As for oil... I suggest you stick with normal diesel oil... which is 15W40... Shell Rotella is probably the most popular you see at chain stores...
Change your oil every 5000 miles.
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Tiger is right, see http://api-ep.api.org/quality/index.cfm?objectid 24F0CD-406B-4762-B290653AE7EA8ECE&method=display_body&er=1&bitmask2001005005000000
for the API oil grades
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I use Shell Helix Diesel 15W/40.
Sump on my (European) W123 300TD takes 6 litres of fresh oil after draining.
Go for a brief suburban run after filling, then wait for 10 minutes after checking the dipstick. Top up as necessary.
Don't forget to oil the big rubber ring before fitting it into the lid of the oil filter canister.
The little copper or steel washers that come with the filter kit are for the sump bolt.
Change your oil every 3000 miles (5000 km) to be on the safe side.
Recycle your oil. It's going to be very precious indeed very soon.
Good luck with cleaning the garage floor.
Euan
1985 300TD 5-spd manual 184K miles ______________
Euan S Kennedy Christchurch New Zealand
E-mail: snipped-for-privacy@dropthisbit.paradise.net.nz
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from snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (cablet) contains these words:

You want to use a 15/40 that is designated for diesels.

I take it that your engine is the five-cylinder 3 litre. The sump plug requires a 14mm. male hex wrench. This is normally found in the tool kit that comes with the car. If you don't have it, then get a hex, or allen key of that dimension that you can use with your socket set. That is to say that it will be a 14mm. hex on one end that engages into the hex hole in the sump plug, and a half-inch square on the other end that will engagage with your socket set devices, like a ratchet or a tommy-bar.
So that has dropped your oil into some sort of container. Beware that on these engines the sump plug is not on the bottom of the sump, so that the oil drops vertically, but is on the side of the sump so that the oil comes out at an angle and is slightly more difficult to catch.
If you have done it once you will know therafter where the oil is going to land, but the first time you try it a little intelligent guess-work is required.....!
The oil filter is easy. It has an alloy cap that is retained by two 13mm. nuts. Undo the nuts, and the cap lifts off. There is a large torique joint ('o'-ring) inside it that needs replacing. The replacement will come with your new filter.
Once the cap of the filter is off, you will find a canister filter inside the housing that has a wire 'bucket handle' on the top of it that will enable you to lift it out of the housing. Replace it with a new canister filter : replace the 'o'-ring in the cap and tighten-down the cap with the two 13mm. nuts. Not too tight, just enough to squash the ring and get an oil-tight seal. If you are not too sure about how tight is tight, then consult your local merc' dealer and ask them for a torque setting for the nuts, and tighten them with a torque wrench at the correct setting.
Again, if your engine is a five cylinder three litre, it will take seven litres, I think, of oil. The minumun is five litres.
Fill it up with six litres of oil, having replaced the sump plug first, and then strart her up. As soon as it starts take your foot off the accellerator pedal, as the engine will be running dry until the oil pump starts picking up oil and pressurising the oil-ways. Let her tick over for a couple of minutes and then cut the engine.
Wait a couple of minutes, and then have a look at what level you have on the dip-stick. You will need to top-up the oil with up to a litre of oil to get it to the 'full' mark, depending on how much oil you had initially put in.
That is it. It is not a difficult job. The only special tool is a 14mm. Allen key.
Apart from the large 'o' ring that I spoke of, you will also find other copper washers and small 'o'rings come with the new filter. You will see where they go with reference to the items that are in the filter, but personally I have never found the need to replace any of them other than the large ring inside the filter cap.
Hope all this helps,
--
All the best,
Stubbsy.
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Writes:

Perhaps in the UK. In the United States, the sump plug on all 123 diesels use a 13mm hex box wrench. No allen bolts on the sumps on the US cars.
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from snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (VCopelan) contains these words:

Thanks, I stand corrected on that, but the same principle applies in that there are no specialist tools involved. The male hex may just be a G-Wagen thing. I have two G-Wagens fitted with the five cylinder, 3 litre engine.
Previously I owned a 115 series saloon, and two 123 series saloons, which were fitted with 220 and 240 engines, and they certainly required a female wrench on the sump-plug rather than the allen-key that the G-Wagens use.
--
All the best,
Stubbsy.
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