Air Conditioning Compressor

I have a leak at the compressor, on my '96 E-300 Diesel, which looks like could be fixed with a Kit sold by MB, according to Martin from Virginia who seems to know that problem, and helped me with informations.
I discovered on the Internet a product (or a few products), of which, one is called CRYO from CRYO-CHEM. This is a leak sealer who according to the text would seal the kind of leak at the joining of hoses over the unit.
If that would remedy the situation, what a difference in cost, from taking off the unit et re-installing it. (I suppose)
Do anyone had experience with or know that product, or that kind of a product?
Jacques
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If this leak is at a metal-to-metal joint, then it just might work. If it is rubber that is allowing the leak, or a crack or split in a metal hose or pipe, then it will probably leak again, though maybe not right away. Either way, a chemical patch is little more than a bandage (like a band-aid) that might stay for months or years or might fall off the next day.
I have been learning the hard way over the last few months that it's probably cheaper to have the work done by a MB garage or a garage that specializes in MBs. I had the heater core and evaporator replaced in my 300TD by a garage that does overflow work for Mercedes dealers. I still think the owner is an honorable man and I think he is conscientious and the heating system now works without the smell of coolant coming into the cabin and the air-conditioning works as well. But when I brought the car home, the cabin temperature sensor in the dash was destroyed (The heating system monovalve never closes when this circuit is broken), there were console lights that are missing and the plastic face of the driver side instrument cluster has been peeled half away where someone tried to pry out the cluster from the front rather than push it out from the back. You don't notice it until you pull on the face a little when bringing the cluster out. Last, and probably least, the cruise control was surging up and down continuously before I took the car to him and now it does not function at all. I finally just brought the car home (with one of his official Mercedes service manuals and several expensive extra parts for troubleshooting the climate control that I did not pay for. Like I said, he really is a good man.) but this good man will never see my car again. Frankly, the last straw was the broken face of the instrument cluster.
He also replaced both rear door window switches and the flex plate in the drive shaft. I got all of this for about $1400 and about 3 months in his possession. I'm satisfied it would have cost twice as much (or more) cash to have this all done at an MB--or MB-centric--garage. On the other hand, I'm having a bit of trouble feeling like I got a good deal. If I'm going to be honest with myself, I'd have to say the _total_ cost (time, worry, loss of use of the car, picking up the pieces of his screw-ups and neglect) of getting this repair _completed_ will be on par with what I would have paid in cash at an "expensive" garage.
The moral of the story is that there are vanishingly few shortcuts to a quality repair, big or small.
Rather than using someone who "seems to know" the _problem_, find someone who really knows your _car_. Deal with him (or her). It'll be worth it.
I think I'll get off my soapbox now. I'm getting dizzy...
Regards,
Ken

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