Autoelectrics problem MB C320

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So they 50/50'd you and you feel good about it.
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x_d wrote:

Disconnect the battery then disconnect and reconnecting the plugs that connect to the module, if your lucky it be just a bad connection. Have a look at the plugs pins when its disconnected and check for any signs of corrosion.
Daryl
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D Walford wrote:

hmm... a few have suggested that the battery is the problem, though I have to admit I don't see the logic in this as the battery itself seems to have adequate power to start the car and does not seem weak with the lights on.
When MB did the computer diagnostic hook up, the technician said (though not witnessed) that he took the electrical connector off the ESP control module and cleaned it. He said that there is no guarantee it would help.
As for disconnecting the battery, I am too afraid to disconnect the battery just in case in a modern car, other electrical system/alarms may need code resettings. Last time I did that to another car - to change the battery, the stereo and alarm played up.
And if it is the battery, wouldn't MB not suggested that is where the fault lies, replace it and not suggesting that I should get a $4000 part? Or are they more business minded than they are looking after potential repeat customers.
Anyhow, I may consider getting a new battery just to test this theory.
Thanks also to Tiger, and also Oz for the tip.
Cheers.
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x_d wrote:

doesn't mean it's actually any good ( yes I know it sounds odd)

but he didn't disconnect the battery resetting the whole system

you might have a pin code problem with the radio , so what...

you really are naive... 4000$ sale or 100$.. now where do you think the service manager will go considering the wont warraenty the work until fixed.. it might work.. .. oh look we did all that work and replaced tha battery just in case , now it's fixed..
sound familiar ?

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atec77 wrote:

I can imagine that if the battery is old, the voltage might drop after starting, causing the fault codes. Especially if the car has been left overnight.
What I will try tomorrow morning is start the car and let it sit for 5 mins to give the battery some charge before restarting and drive off.

This is more a response to Daryl's suggestion of cleaning the contacts to the ESP control module.

My time means money. If I have to take time off work to drive to MB to get the codes resetting, it is worth hundreds of dollars (I am in a service industry, if I don't see clients, I don't make money, and I work 6 days a week, exactly when MB service departments open). Of course I can get a relative to take the car but I would then have to borrow a car, too much hassle.

Of course I can understand the business model. But I wonder if this is going to alienate potential repeat customers when their products appear to be inferior, leading to a lifetime (and including potential family and friends recommendation) of product avoidance. I can imagine the short term gain may offset long term benefits for the company. As I said, I am already thinking of trading it in for a Lexus (which has had far better quality satisfaction)
No wonder TopGear always seem to rubbish the MB brand, saying that they always break down.
Cheers.

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Again, what do you have to lose in an original battery and a new battery compared to several thousand dollars of misdiagnosed part?
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MB dealer in USA diagnosed the E320. That was their solution and it worked. Battery did not seem weak either. Starter was fast and normal. Nothing to indicate bad battery... but that was their answer. I know the battery was original and 5 years old.
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Tiger wrote:

Yes I will get the battery replaced tomorrow. Seems that your MB dealer in the USA knows of the problem. I wonder if they have notified other MB service centres around the world about it. And if so this should have been the initial fix offer.
For me, it would seem that either this has not taken place, or the technicians are not keeping up to date, or the MB service department in Australia is trying to rip me off.
We shall see after tomorrow I guess if this will fix the problem. I did check with the original owner. The battery was replaced when one year old due to a problem. The current battery is 4 years old.
Cheers
PS - thanks heaps for your input :-))))
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There are devices available now that keep enough power in the car to stop the radio, etc. from losing their settings. If the person replacing the battery uses one of these, you won't need to worry about PIN codes, etc..
Also, the first place to look when a late model vehicle is having sensor problems is the earth wires between the negative post of the battery, the body and engine. It is common to find that the original wires are too small and cause sensor malfunctions. A new battery may well mask a minor wiring inadequacy.
--
Athol
<http://cust.idl.com.au/athol Linux Registered User # 254000
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Athol wrote:

I learnt a lesson that day disconnecting the battery. However the comment about disconnecting the Mercedes-Benz's battery more or less followed Daryl's suggestion to disconnect the battery to see if that can reset the computers (or at least that's what I thought he was meaning). The Mercedes-Benz does have well marked points where I can connect a set of jumper leads to another car battery whilst I change the faulty one, which should eliminate the risk of having no electricity running through the computers/stereos.
As an update, I followed through with charging the battery this morning by starting the car and letting it run. The fault appeared immediately. I left the engine running whilst having breakfast. Stopping the car and then restarting when we were ready to leave saw the errors disappear, and never came back for the day, which does support the theory of a weakened battery. I am still puzzled why the car would start fairly easily, and yet threw the error codes, as I would imagine the voltage and current from the alternator would kick in fairly early. The funny thing is that if Mercedes-Benz and other car manufacturers can make all these sensors for errors, why can't they incorporate a sensor for a dying battery, to indicate when it is time to change the battery prior to other computers throwing all these error codes.
I had a look at the size of the battery, and it is quite a large and unusual one labelled N88 (stopping me from running into Kmart or Supercheap to get one). The service station near where I worked had to order one in, which means that I won't be able to get a new battery until tomorrow.
Still, I am very disappointed with Mercedes-Benz for not diagnosing the battery as a possible fault. Playing the sceptical consumer, I wonder if the car was in warranty, would I be told differently as to where the fault lies.
If the battery replacement solve the problem, I will be the first to ring the Mercedes-Benz service managers, to let them know of my feelings on the matter.
For those who may consider buying a Mercedes-Benz, I hope you take all this into consideration.
Cheers

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I think it has something to do with one cell of the battery (6) that is weakened or dying... So I am not surprised...
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x_d wrote:

A voltmeter across the battery terminals whilst starting may revel whats happening. I suspect because of a weak battery there is a significant voltage drop whilst cranking, the sensors will be operating outside their parameters because of the low voltage and will throw up a fault code. The fault codes would have already been detected before the alternator is charging so a weak battery as the cause makes sense. Maybe the MB computer system should have someway of disregarding fault codes whilst the engine is cranking?
Daryl
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wrote:

Have you had any aftermarket electronics installed on the car?
My '99 E430 (which I *love*) had seme aftermarket connections to a cell phone booster from the previous owner that was draining the battery. I have similar but not as severe electronic gremlins as the battery discharged over time (the reason he sold it to me cheap). Fixing that electrical "leak" has cleared up all of the problems and I have been running trouble free for 3 years now.

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me wrote:

Hi everyone,
The car does not have any aftermarket electronics installed. Everything was installed by MB including the cradle for the mobile phone.
As an update, I had a new battery put in today. $140 later and I thought everything was cured. Picked the car up from the local service station and it ran smoothly. Then on the way home this evening, the codes appeared again! ARGGGGGGG!!!!
However, it took 10 mins into the journey before it appeared, and stopping and restarting the car again took the gremlins away all the way home. Surely it can't be a fault in a new battery as it would have appeared soon after starting.
I hope the fault does not lie in the ESP control module, but this does not look good.
Thoughts anyone? The only other thing I could do would be following Daryl's suggestion of cleaning all the contacts to the ESP module. However, I will consider getting the original owner to bring it into another MB service centre to get a second opinion.
However I will see what it does tomorrow morning as for the last few days, the faults appear almost straight away on starting, but does not appear at all on the journey to work.
Still yet to hear from MB Australia however on what discount offer I will receive.
Looking more like a Lexus IS is coming into my garage soon (though personally an MX 5 hardtop would be much nicer :-))).
Cheers.
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x_d wrote:

I didn't know MB makes cell phones
and who made the all the other things that escaped you ? I wonder..

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??? The owner said "everything was installed by MB", I at least read it that the car has a genuine MB cell phone kit, the cell phone may be after market but one intended for the genuine car kit should not drain the battery dead.
Since this was a C-model car, it cannot be the second battery that has caused problems in some E-class cars. I cannot help but sure hope you get good advice and get the car running well and enjoy it.
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atec77 wrote:

The cradle was installed by MB. It was an option when the car was designed back in 2001 and accepts Nokia models. Of course, nowadays, they don't need these cradles (which would become obsolete quickly anyway as phone models change so quickly) as I would imagine the newer models would have Bluetooth options.
Cheers.

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x_d wrote:

I put the phone in a 'lations Kompressor at a fraction of the cost of MB charges ( phone was 400$ cheaper) , it's never missed a beat so it cant be hard to get the install right , now is yours working everything 100% ?
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atec77 wrote:

A friend bought a 2005 C200 Kompressor recently. He did not order a phone system for his car. Instead, he got a Blueant bluetooth unit which he leaves permanently on his visor. Cost - $180 ish.
I guess he doesn't mind recharging it (or put fresh batteries in everyso often) and does not mind not having the feature of dialing via the steering wheel buttons.
Anyway, the battery was not the solution. This morning, the fault codes appeared again on starting. The only thing that I have learnt to do is warm up the engine and then the fault would go away.
I wonder if the heat from the engine bay improves a connection somewhere (hoping that it has nothing to do with the ESP control module), but how would I go about finding where it is missing. If I drive the car into MB for a diagnostic, the heat would keep the fault away so they can't diagnose it. I can imagine the only way is leave the car with MB overnight so that they can test it in the morning cold. ?Thoughts
Cheers.
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So you still got all faults as you initially stated or just the ESP? Computer rarely if ever go bad... 98% of the time, it is not the computer. I'd suggest you take the car to have second opinion at a different MB dealer.
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