Block Heater - Post Mortem

As a follow-up to the log and arduous saga of my engine rebuild and associated trouble, I wanted to post a note regarding the block heater fiasco.
My block heater (v3.0) works fine now. But only after an extreme
chemical flushing of the block water jacket. This is the first time I have ever heard of a process of water jacket flushing, but I now know that it is a procedure that could be of help to anyone experiencing problems with block and engine temperature issues.
First of all, NEVER use radiator "quick fixes" like "Stop Leak" and other panaceas that address symptoms but not causes. I cannot imagine a Mercedes-Benz owner resorting to such measures, but apparently one did with my car, in its earlier life. What "Stop Leak" does is fill your radiator and engine block with, among other undesirable things, is copper. The copper purportedly fills the hole and stops the leak in the radiator that should have been replaced instead. Problem is, on diesel Benzes, the copper also attaches itself to the elements of the block heater. And shorts it out.
An additional benefit of the extensive and thorough flush administered to my engine is that it runs about 7-10 degrees cooler. Apparently, and any foreign crap introduced (such as "Stop Leak") into the cooling system, collects as gunk in the bottom of the engine block and reduces cooling circulation volume, and interferes with block heater, etc.
Liver and Learn!
Thanks to all who responded during this entire ordeal.
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Just wondering: how does one add copper to a radiator?
If it isn't a metal then it might be in form of a salt, such as copper sulphate. How is that supposed to selectively fill holes?
Any scientific answers?
Cheers DAS
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No scientific answers. I only recall this product being sold years ago and wondering why anyone would use it. My understanding of it is that the amalgamation will find its way into a hole in the radiator and stop the leak. I suppose on an engine that doesn't require a block heater, one may never experience the adverse side effect of it, but it's definitely not for diesels.
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these days the stop leak compound is a silicate of some kind. It remains in solution when the water is cool, but will crystalize out at an opening where it comes into contact with air and the engine is warm. I imagine at times past some manufacturers used a copper salt as well. I've used an organic sealer made by GM and it has worked extremely well. I've plugged a definite head gasket leak for years now.
cheers, guenter

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